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  1. #1
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    Wired, wireless on the same router at same time?

    I have an internet connection using a Cox Cable Modem on a stand-alone Desktop running XP Professional with Service Pack 3. The Cox cable (Cat 6) is run from the house underground in a PVC conduit to the separate building in my back yard where my stand-alone Desktop is located.

    I intend to switch my internet service to my local City's Fiber Optic System.
    They will run their separte Fiber Optic cable through the same underground conduit, but leave the Cox cable in the conduit.

    Since the Cox cable (now unused) already runs back to the house, I plan on dropping it down into a room that already has a Cox TV cable in it.

    From a router in the back yard building, I will connect my Desktop to a laptop (yet to be purchased) in that room in the house - thereby having a "wired" network connection between the Desktop and the Laptop.

    QUESTION IS: Can a router be configured to have both a "wired" connection and a "wireless" connection at the same time?

    Can someone on the laptop in the house be using the "wired" connection while someone else in the house on another laptop be using a "wireless connection at the same time.

    Actually, it really would not be a problem if they cannot both be used at the same time.
    I only need to be able to seamlessly switch between "wired" and "wireless".
    Last edited by StevenXXXX; 2011-11-27 at 16:06.

  2. #2
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    Many routers in the market support wired and wireless connections and all that do, allow the many computers that can be connected, to be connected at the same time.
    Last edited by ruirib; 2011-11-27 at 16:55.

  3. #3
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    The simple answer is Yes. Routers are frequently designed to enable seamless multiple connections at a Gateway. At this location, have at least 8 active hosts on the network at any one time, running with both wired and wireless connections. I can add or remove additional machines as required.

    In the UK, most routers are in fact modem-routers, providing either a fibre, cable or adsl modem connection and a router/switch function. They come with dual interfaces on the host network: wireless and wired. One can connect via either wired or wireless, or both. However, I can't be certain what interfaces your router will have.

    Another thought crosses my mind: You note that you will connect the Desktop to to the Laptop over a wired network. I'm not quite sure I get that bit. Normally the laptop would connect to the router over the wireless port (though it could connect wired). The desktop could then connect to the router over a wired connection. The network switch inside the router will enable the desktop and laptop to talk to each other for information and data sharing etc.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinto Tech View Post
    Another thought crosses my mind: You note that you will connect the Desktop to to the Laptop over a wired network. I'm not quite sure I get that bit. Normally the laptop would connect to the router over the wireless port (though it could connect wired). The desktop could then connect to the router over a wired connection. The network switch inside the router will enable the desktop and laptop to talk to each other for information and data sharing etc.
    Sorry for not being very clear.

    The desktop is intended to be the main computer & will connect directly to the Fiber Optic Cable in the building in my back yard.
    The Router will sit next to the desktop. From the Router will be a "wired" connection to the Laptop in the house.

    I expect to replace the Desktop sometime in 2012, but must use it for the time being.
    Do you see any problems with that Desktop running the older XP Professional with Service Pack 3 & IE 8?

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    How does the desktop connect to the internet? USB? Network card?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    How does the desktop connect to the internet? USB? Network card?
    The Desktop will connect to the Internet using the Fiber Optic Cable that will be run directly to it.

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StevenXXXX View Post
    The Desktop will connect to the Internet using the Fiber Optic Cable that will be run directly to it.
    Steven,

    It is fairly rare to find a Fiber Optic Network Interface card in a consumer PC. Usually the FO only gets as far as the modem/router and from there to the PC via RJ-45 cable. I'd be very surprised to find that a City run system would be FO all the way to the PC.

    P.S. Love your town! We stay there over night both ways when we take our RV to Texas.
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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I think the proper connection should be wire coming into house to modem from ISP, ethernet cable from modem to wireless router, ethernet cable from router to desktop PC input. If laptops have wireless capabilities, they will connect wirelessly to the wireless router.
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  9. #9
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    Ruirib and Retired Geek hit the nail on the head with my confusion.

    From what you say Steve, you want to connect Fibre to the PC, then connect the router to the PC and finally connect the laptop to the router wirelessly.

    A more standard approach, and one that will not casue lots of routing headaches is to connect fibre to the router, then the PC and laptop to the router (let it do its routing / gatway function) via wireless and ethernet.

    The attached drawing shows the configuration. The top drawing is what I think you have described what you want to do, while the bottom drawing the is standard method. There are serious networking and security issues if you attempt to implement the first option.

    Fibre Network.jpg

    Bear in mind this is written from a UK perspective where the router often has a wireless as well Ethernet LAN port plus fibre, adsl or cable on the WAN/Gateway side, so no additional wireless access point is required - in the US, you may require a wireless access point (as per Ted's description) if your router does not have one in built.
    Last edited by Tinto Tech; 2011-11-28 at 13:36. Reason: contrast UK wireless modem router versus US separate modem and router and speeling mishtakes

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    Of course, the suggestions by Retired Geek, Ted and Tinto all make sense. In order to provide you a more flexible solution, if you have that option, get the router to connect to whatever interface device is provided by the Fibre provider. You can then connect as many computers, consoles or other devices to the network as it pleases you, all with internet access.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredGeek View Post
    Steven,

    It is fairly rare to find a Fiber Optic Network Interface card in a consumer PC. Usually the FO only gets as far as the modem/router and from there to the PC via RJ-45 cable. I'd be very surprised to find that a City run system would be FO all the way to the PC.

    P.S. Love your town! We stay there over night both ways when we take our RV to Texas.
    You are right of course.

    Fiber Optic does run only to their box which will sit on the outside wall of the building in my back yard (the building with the Desktop in it). Then, "they" run a cable (not sure what, but could be Cat 6, etc.) from their box through the wall & directly to the Desktop (NO modem). Will only be about an 8 foot run. They only do this last step to one (1) computer. If you have other computers / laptops, that wiring is left to the homeowner - hence my need for the Router, using the no longer used Cox Cable to have a "wired" connection to a laptop in the house, & wanting a wireless connection for any other computers / devices.
    Last edited by StevenXXXX; 2011-11-28 at 13:44.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinto Tech View Post
    Ruirib and Retired Geek hit the nail on the head with my confusion.

    From what you say Steve, you want to connect Fibre to the PC, then connect the router to the PC and finally connect the laptop to the router wirelessly.

    A more standard approach, and one that will not casue lots of routing headaches is to connect fibre to the router, then the PC and laptop to the router (let it do its routing / gatway function) via wireless and ethernet.

    The attached drawing shows the configuration. The top drawing is what I think you have described what you want to do, while the bottom drawing the is standard method. There are serious networking and security issues if you attempt to implement the first option.

    Fibre Network.jpg

    Bear in mind this is written from a UK perspective where the router often has a wireless as well Ethernet LAN port plus fibre, adsl or cable on the WAN/Gateway side, so no additional wireless access point is required - in the US, you may require a wireless access point (as per Ted's description) if your router does not have one in built.
    I guess it would not be a problem to do as you say & connect the Router to the Fiber Optic (using a short 8' CAT 6 cable), then connect the desktop to the Router using another 3' CAT 6 cable, then connect the laptop in the house using the now unused Cox Cable (a wired connection).

    My Question then is, How do other computers / devices connect "wirelessly" to the same network at the same time that the Desktop & Laptop are connected by separate "wired" connections?

  13. #13
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    Steven, the router enables devices to communicate with eachother inside the LAN as well as providing a gateway function between all devices on the LAN and the internet.

    The switch will hopefully have wireless and wired port. Communication is seamless with the router managing data packets to be sent between hosts on the internet and devices on your LAN. Also, hopefully, inside the router is a firewall which can block intrusions and data being sent in either direction as per you specification.

    If your laptop requests a web page from google.com, your router sends the request to the google web server and waits the reply. Meanwhile your desktop tries to open to cnn.com and the router sends that request to the web server at cnn and awaits the reply. When either or both web servers reply, your router will forward the data packets to the correct host on your LAN. The media that is used to transport the data is transparent to the router. Everything "just works".

    Connect the router to the fibre terminal node using cat5 or similar, then the Laptop can connect over a wireless port on the router if it has one, if not you will need to connect a wireless access point to the router via cat5.

  14. #14
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    The wireless router will have a transsmitter that the receiver on your laptops will receive (this is a VERY simplistic rendition of what happens) Or it may be the other way around where the laptops have a Wi-Fi radio that transmits to the receiver on the router. Not really sure which, but not germaine to the discussion. As stated by others, most modern wireless routers allow wired connections through ethernet cables (mine allows up to 4 wired connections) and built in wireless radios that allow connections by compatible laptops or wireless devices on remote desktops.(my Nook Color's and Wi-Fi enabled smart phones can connect to the router as well.)
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  15. #15
    3 Star Lounger Jagworld's Avatar
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    Yes, my ATT U-verse router handles everything like your's Ted.

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