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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    how to downgrade from ultimate to home premium?

    An Acer Aspire 5732Z that came with Win 7 Home Premium pre-installed on C: & a 12GB hidden recovery partition (i.e. no CDs/DVDs) labelled in command line as PQSERVICE.

    The owner upgraded it to Win 7 Ultimate (I think he borrowed the disk), but then decided hed prefer Home Premium after all & has asked me to try to sort it out as Im currently studying for the A+ qualification.

    Am I right in thinking its not possible to downgrade from ultimate to home premium? If so, I guess Ill have to wipe everything in C:, but Im not sure how to then use command line to reload the original OS from the recovery partition.

    Could someone explain what i need to do, or point me to a tutorial somewhere, please? I do have some experience of command line, though not a lot, but I'm keen to learn - as long as I don't mess up the recovery files!

    TIA

  2. #2
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    Usually laptops either come with a CD/DVD that allow you to boot and restore it to factory settings, or you can choose an option to do so during boot. Seems that for Acer laptops, the advice is to hit F10 several times after you get Acer logo on boot and then choose the adequate option.

    I fail to see what is there to gain from downgrading. The OS is the same, it only offers additional features. I doubt that from a regular user's point of view, the difference is noticeable.

  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    You cannot downgrade. Changing versions downward requires a Custom (Clean) install. I'm with Rui though. The 2 versions will not have any noticeable differences for the average user. The only differences are a larger feature set with the Ultimate version. This site shows the needed steps.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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    JeffK (2011-12-10)

  5. #4
    New Lounger
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    Thanks for your input, Rui & Ted.

    Having spoken to him further, he now acknowledges that he probably just needs to get used to the different ways ultimate works, from a user’s point of view, but there is one specific thing he’d like changed, if possible.

    User Account Control: it didn’t run in his previous W7 home premium - either it was set to off by default (unlikely...?), or the owner before him had turned it off. I know it can be set at different levels, or turned off completely, but all the levels work across the board, so........

    Is it possible to switch it off for specific programmes that he uses regularly & knows are safe, e.g. CCleaner, but leave it on otherwise or is he stuck with being either on or off?

  6. #5
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    Hi Jeff,

    It should be noted that the UAC behavior is the same for all Windows versions, no difference from Ultimate to Home.
    No, I am afraid you can't configure the UAC for specific programs. I don't believe in turning off the UAC, though some members here do that. I run an OS firewall that is actually more demanding than the UAC (it can be configured per program, though), so I set the UAC to the less agressive level, but I do keep it on.

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    JeffK (2011-12-10)

  8. #6
    New Lounger
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    Hi Rui,
    thanks for such a speedy response! What are you referring to when you say you're running an OS firewall, something other than the built in windows firewall? If so, what is it, please?

    Thanks
    Last edited by JeffK; 2011-12-10 at 10:02.

  9. #7
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    Hi Jeff,

    The windows firewall is a firewall in the original sense, that is, controls what programs can send and receive information from the networks a computer is connected to, local or non local (such as the internet). Some security products introduced the concept of OS firewall (first time I read it was from ZoneAlarm), meaning that such products do not only control what goes on with your computer's networking, but also control what programs and components (dlls, etc) run on your computer, thus behaving as an OS firewall.

    Apps that behave as this add an additional layer to your security, by keeping lists of what is allowed to run and what is not, and keeping tabs on registry changes and auto run programs. With an app such as this, nothing will run on your computer without your permission or without being allowed by an whitelist. Contrary to the UAC, these security apps keep individual programs lists, allowing very precise control.

    There are several apps that do this - Comodo, ZoneAlarm, Norton Internet Security. I use Online Armor, have been using it for the last 3 years and I like it a lot. After a starting period of learning, it is basically unobtrusive and hardly requires any input, except for new programs, where it can be a bit annoying with a few request permissions, but even that can be mitigated, in OA's case by the use of a learning mode.

    The good thing with OA is that it can run alongside one of the many popular AV apps, so you actually get an additional layer of defense against malware, since you have the AV app and OA running at the same time, without impacting your PC's performance in a visible way.

    HTH
    Last edited by ruirib; 2011-12-10 at 17:25. Reason: typo

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    JeffK (2011-12-10)

  11. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I have to concur with Rui once again. I have UAC down to a minimum level, but not turned off. I also use Online Armor++ on our 2 main PC's. Some believe that the Windows Firewall with inbound protection is all you need, but my belief is that Outbound protection may save those in your contacts list. If you get an infection, you don't want to pass it on to everyone else do you. The inbound protection helps prevent your getting an infection, but no single app can catch 100% and the outbound protection can help in the cases where you do get gotten!
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

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