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  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
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    Could crash reports be a fishing-ground for crooks?

    Or is it credible that a capable organisation offering technical support would intercept crash reports in order to acquire clients?

    Yesterday I filed to Microsoft several successive crash reports on one utility before abandoning it.


    Today I got a lady on my phone line telling me I had done that (though without naming the utility) and that she had Microsoft's authority to save me from repeated trouble by showing me what I needed to do to my XP operating system.


    I was intrigued enough to try and find out what she really wanted me to do. It took a while, but eventually she spelled out www.efix.co that I was to type into the address line of IE. While she talked on, I searched for that on another browser and found a few references that could have been hits on dummy sites created to make the URL seem OK. I had never seen a .co without a country before but the search engine seemed comfortable with it. I also found an efix.co.uk that was registered in Israel. However, since there were no hints of security warnings found by the spiders, I eventually clicked the IE line and got a decent enough home page, elementary but not clumsy. I described what I saw and my caller asked whether I could see the image of a call-centre employee. I could: he had no eyes, but was beside a 'TECHNICAL SUPPORT' button. She denied that she wanted to take over my PC in order to 'solve my problem', but I wasn't so sure, even though I had told her it was five years old, and that hadn't made her hang up.


    As I moused over the CONTACTS menu item the flash area below the menu showed a quite delightful model's portrait - I felt sure my caller would claim it was herself, had she known I was exploring the window.


    I wasn't keen to provide some criminals with a docile PC to help them blow up the Pentagon etc., so I told her frankly I was scared, and perhaps she'd better try and help her next client.


    I had not liked the look of the www.ammyy.com/AMMYY_Admin.exe link when I moused over the 'TECHNICAL SUPPORT' button.


    Was I over-cautious or foolhardy?

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger chowur's Avatar
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    So,many M$ scams out thier it isn't funny.Here is just (one) article on the subject;http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/06...rt_scam_calls/
    Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them. -Albert Einsten

  3. #3
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    You were quite correct to be cautious as there are many scams out there.

    Regarding the .co domain, that used to be for Columbia but it is now used worldwide. This Wiki article gives a little bit more detail.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Browni For This Useful Post:

    harrodsyd (2011-12-22)

  5. #4
    2 Star Lounger cyberdiva's Avatar
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    @harrodsyd - I don't think you were either over-cautious or foolhardy. Not at all! The whole thing sounds like a scam. What I find most disconcerting is that scammers were able to intercept or get hold of your crash reports. I hope you did several thorough scans of your computer after you hung up to see whether somehow there was malware that was sending info to the scammers. Also, did you in fact give your phone number to Microsoft when you submitted your crash reports? I don't recall ever having done that. Anyway, I definitely think you did the right thing in not permitting the person to take over your computer.

    Added note: after reading the article whose link chowur provided above, I'm more sure than ever that this was a scam. The good news is that it might have been a cold call rather than provoked by getting hold of your crash reports. Either way, you did the right thing to refuse the person's "help." I'd still do a few scans to be sure nothing evil has found its way to your computer.
    Last edited by cyberdiva; 2011-12-23 at 10:04.

  6. #5
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    Microsoft scam call

    I got a call from "Microsoft". The caller said with an indian accent that my pc is infected and needs to be maintened.
    After I told him that I run a mac and don't need his help he hung up...
    I checked that number on http://www.tellows.com and it says it is scam.
    someone with same experiences?

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