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Thread: big bang

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    big bang

    did anyone else experience the big bang this morning resulting in computer shutdown. luckily neither of my 2 computers suffered any damage. i would like to know what it was. the bang came from outside

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    Quote Originally Posted by plarnold View Post
    did anyone else experience the big bang this morning resulting in computer shutdown. luckily neither of my 2 computers suffered any damage. i would like to know what it was. the bang came from outside
    plarnold,
    Hello....and welcome to the W.S Lounge....The "big bang" was most likely a transformer on a power pole close by deciding to end it's life.... This probably resulted in a huge spike (power surge) momentarily causing your power to dip or shut off. This is why all PC's and other electronic equipment should be using "surge suppressors" of some kind... Your lucky that it didn't trash your PC's. I use an APC backup power supply that has built in suppressors for just these kind of things.... They are available at the "Big Box" type stores ...Like "Best Buy" , etc. Just make sure that you get one large enough "Wattage Wise" to handle your loads.... Regards Fred
    PlainFred

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    The transformer theory makes sense, either that or the sky is falling!
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    Have a Great Day! Ted


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    The transformer theory makes sense, either that or the sky is falling!
    Transformer may explain a noise. And does not create a spike. Such spikes are common myths when advertising and hearsay create knowledge. That transformer would have caused a voltage drop. A sag. A brownout. Something that does not damage electronics. And that would be completely ignored by every surge protector.

    Anyone can read numbers on a protector's box. Numbers must be learned before knowledge can exist. A 120 volt protector may list a 330 let-though voltage. That means a "surge suppressors" of any kind does nothing - remains completely inert - until 120 volts exceeds 330 volts. A failing transformer means voltage drops below 120 volts. Simple numbers even printed on the box so that any layman can know before making any recommendation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Transformer may explain a noise. And does not create a spike. Such spikes are common myths when advertising and hearsay create knowledge.
    westom,
    Hello... Having worked in the "Electronics" industry for about 40 some odd years ... I can assure you that an "Exploding Transformer" can,and will create a huge spike...(As well as transmit RFI noise) And can wipe out anything that is on the line...that is not protected by some sort of suppression (Mov , Transorb, , Gas tube surge suppressor, et-al) device... and is not a myth.... Regards Fred
    PlainFred

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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain Fred View Post
    Having worked in the "Electronics" industry for about 40 some odd years ...
    Another's exploding transformer does not cause spikes or high voltage on local distribution. Some types of very rare failures can cause the OP's transformer to explode. For example, 33,000 volts shorted to local distribution. But he does not describe his nearby transformer exploded. That damage would be obvious. He also does not describe damage typically found when 13,000 or 33,000 volts are connected directly to household appliances via a failed transformer. He might be describing how a line fuse trips. That is nothing more than a sag (lower voltage) eventually becoming a blackout.

    A more likely reason for that noise: a fuse tripped. Which is also a lower voltage – no spike.

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    What difference does this make in our lives. Whether a transformer exploded, or a line fuse tripped, it's not worth discussing.

    I wish you both a very Merry Christmas and continued Happy Holidays with a bright New Year!
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    Have a Great Day! Ted


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    I bet there's some kind of combination that makes both views correct; seems likely that when a tranny explodes there is no spike just EOL plunge, but just before the explosion, there has to be something going wrong that's making the tranny unstable right? That measurement of time that we can only determine instrumentally seems like plenty for a surge of electricity to slip by and do its damaging deed!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Infinicore View Post
    I bet there's some kind of combination that makes both views correct;
    To have a spike, the appliance must be connected to something that sources that higher voltage. An exploding transformer does not generate a high voltage. But urban myths encouraged by blaming every anomaly as a surge will then insist that transformer created a high voltage.

    If a transformer exploded, then resulting debris and the many service trucks working for hours would be obvious. Wild speculation that a transformer exploded was generated without even one reason to suspect same.

    > The "big bang" was most likely a transformer ...

    No facts existed to make that assumption. Far more likely (and still only speculation) was a line fuse tripped. Exploding transformers are extremely rare. Exploding transformers do not create a high voltage.

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    An exploding transformer does not generate a high voltage.
    Technically I agreed with ya, but WIKI says some mumbo jumbo about rapid buildup or decay of a magnetic field being able to induce energy into an associated circuit (sounds like a transformer just before it explodes to me) and mentions a quote "mundane causes such as a fault in a transformer," and if WIKI says its so, by goodness it must be!!

    it seems to me that the original question was a bit far-out for a world-wide forum
    True, these darn human minds of ours just can't stay on point like a computer can can they.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Infinicore View Post
    Technically I agreed with ya, but WIKI says some mumbo jumbo about rapid buildup or decay of a magnetic field being able to induce energy into an associated circuit
    AC electricity, changing from plus to minus 60 times every second, also creates spikes. Must be true because such changes induce energy by collapsing magnetic fields inside a transformer.

    Yes, if we make conclusions by ignoring numbers and the underlying science. Irrelevant once we add reality. The numbers and what exposes on that myth - electricity turns off 120 times every second.

    Most forget that a subjective conclusion is best called advertising or a scam. Numbers (perspective) should have also been included with that conclusion. No numbers were provided. Implies an author who is told what to think; who did not first learn the science. Why then was that speculation given credence?

    Based upon wild speculation, a transformer exploded. Nothing in the OP's post even implies that happened. That loud bang is typical of a fuse blowing. That far more common event further suggests only wild speculation was posted. A blowing fuse also does not create a voltage spike.

    And again because it is the underlying and most critical fact. Conclusions must be based in hard facts and numbers. Urban myths, hearsay, and wild speculation are quickly identified when someone is first to post without even one reason to believe it. Informed consumers immediately suspected the worst when a suggestion does not also say why, did not cite even one fact to believe it, and did not include the always required numbers. Subjective claims are routine and necessary to promote junk science conclusions.

    Learn from the murder of seven Challenger astronauts. Management made decisions by ignoring numbers and facts. Not even one engineer said it was safe to launch. We all learn from history to think as responsible adults. We all learned about Challenger to see through myths and wild speculation. An exploding transformer was not realistic. Not one hard fact justified that conclusion. Did you immediately see that as wild speculation? Or did you not yet learn lessons taught in history - ie Challenger? Not even one reason was provided to believe a transformer exploded. Or explain why that would create any voltage spike.

    Those subjective conclusions make no sense. And why even with numbers. If those magnetic field changes cause voltage spikes, then your AC voltage spikes 120 times every second (60 hertz AC).
    Last edited by westom; 2011-12-26 at 20:15.

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