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  1. #1
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    George's PC Specs. / Laptop. Desktop.

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  3. #2
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    More importantly, how long can we hang on with our IPv4 equipment and software!
    BATcher

    Mr Owl ate my metal worm

  4. #3
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    A lot of people will be caught out, even though it's been on the cards for a long time...

    Wonder how many router manufacturers will update firmware, and how many will force customers to buy afresh!
    George's PC Specs. / Laptop. Desktop.

  5. #4
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    Wonder how many router manufacturers will update firmware
    For residential customers, the answer is "none" - well, ok, perhaps a few, but it's currently a none-issue for residential users. Should IPv6 access be enabled by some sites this year, they will still be reachable over IPv4 by implementing dual stacks. Failure to do so would render those sites unreachable to the very audience they wish to keep.

    There are clear benefits in IPv6, not just the enormous address space, but also a reduction in network traffic due to replacing broadcast packets with multicast packets and processing efficiency gains as a result of reduction and simplification of the fields within a IPv6 packet. These are important for corporate use and it's there that I would expect to see the role out on IPv6 to end users first. Those corporate big guns should already have plans in place for IPv6 migration due to the benefits delivered.

    Over the long term manufacturers will release new hardware with IPv6 enabled for residential customers, but I expect IPv4 to be around for a long while yet.

  6. #5
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Cisco Linksys 4200e router dual band router has both IPv4 and IPv6 access I believe

    Capture.JPG

    I have blocked all my personal info.
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  7. #6
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    Yup, Cisco are one of the router manufacturers that I would expect to have this in hand already, but there is a big difference between the WAN interface of the router being capable and the user network being capable.

    It's not just about a number of large websites such as Google, Facebook, Yahoo and Bing. It's about the end user and their Link-Local networks, which currently for residential users are implemented using and rely upon IPv4, even if Vista and Win7 already support IPv6 - the point I think Batcher was making.

    For corporate users it's different - large companies will potentially benefit big time with the network efficiency savings noted earlier.

  8. #7
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I see. Even though my router is capable, my ISP and/or modem supplied by my ISP may not be ready. I believe this is partly what you are saying. Believe me, I am NOT a network guy.
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  9. #8
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    Yes, sort of.

    The websites mentioned will allow hosts to connect to them using IPv6 from sometime later this year. Your ISP must enable an IPv6 connection and propogate it through his network for you to be able to use IPv6 and to reach those sites on the new protocol. If your ISP doesn't enable IPv6 and those websites only support IPv6, they will disappear to you on your current IPv4 connection. So, to prevent their business drying up overnight, the sites will support both.

    Moreover, on your network, you probably have a router with an IPv4 gateway address of 192.168.x.x and devices inside the NAT router on the same subnet, e.g. 192.168.1.2, 192.168.1.3 etc. These can talk to each other because they understand the IPv4 addresses such as 192.168.x.x. If one runs Vista or above they can also understand IPv6 addresses, but if you have network drive, or internt TV, or smartphone that perhaps can't support IPv6, your network would be broken by the implementation of IPv6 on your internal network.

    That's a problem for residential users who certainly do not wish to buy new hardware to fix a problem not of their making and that give them no tangible benefits. To large companies though, there are big advantages due to reduced network traffic and other efficiency savings in IPv6. These are the guys that will be connected to the web using IPv6 first.

    For some time to come however, sites and IPS's who enable IPv6 will also need to support IPv4 too. As a simile, here in the UK we are approaching the completion of the switchover from analogue TV to digital TV. It's a process that has been planned for many years and has been in implementation for 2-3 years I think. That's a big project for 60 Million people. Now consider it for 4 Billion users and you get to the size of the role out for IPv6 on the web.
    Last edited by Tinto Tech; 2012-01-18 at 17:08. Reason: Clarification in last paragraph of sites and ISP's running dual IPv4 and IPv6

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  11. #9
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    Did you lose your ability to use the 'Net on June 8th of 2011? If not, then there is little need to worry. http://test-ipv6.com/ipv6day.html

    I use the Internet extensively in my job as do many people in my company. We saw no impact. Eventually the home equipment will catch up, which will happen long before most ISPs need to start using IPv6 to dole out addresses to their customers. Its not that there aren't enough unused IPv4 addresses. There are plenty for a while. Its just that there are no more for sale.
    Chuck

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    Tinto Tech (2012-01-18)

  13. #10
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Thanks Tinto. Even though much of what you mention is still something above my understanding, over time I will begin to understand more of it. That's the way I learn. Thank you for the explanation.
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  14. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Brown View Post
    Did you lose your ability to use the 'Net on June 8th of 2011? If not, then there is little need to worry. http://test-ipv6.com/ipv6day.html

    I use the Internet extensively in my job as do many people in my company. We saw no impact. Eventually the home equipment will catch up, which will happen long before most ISPs need to start using IPv6 to dole out addresses to their customers. Its not that there aren't enough unused IPv4 addresses. There are plenty for a while. Its just that there are no more for sale.
    That's exactly how I see it too.

  15. #12
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    For my home network (Windows 7 Home Premium), when trying to set up a Homegroup, a warning window tells me I need to enable IPv6 before I can do so. However, my network connections thingy shows both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled . . ..

  16. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dic View Post
    For my home network (Windows 7 Home Premium), when trying to set up a Homegroup, a warning window tells me I need to enable IPv6 before I can do so. However, my network connections thingy shows both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled . . ..
    Homegroup uses PNRP which needs IPv6: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PNRP

    There are apparently two required services which can also cause that response if disabled: IPv6 error when trying to join Homegroup in Windows 7


    On the other hand, it could be your router thingy or your firewall thingy. ;-)

    Ultimate Troubleshooting Guide for Windows 7 HomeGroup Connection Issues


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  18. #14
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    Bruce: Haven't followed through on your links, yet, but after disconnecting everything from the modem and router, and reconnecting after a pee stop, another persistent problem went away: no more 404s when trying to bring up any Microsoft Download page.

    Since the three m/cs on my network had shared the problem, over several days, I don't think it can have been that single answer to the call of nature that did the trick. Could have been cumulative, I suppose.

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