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  1. #1
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    Migrating from POP3 to IMAP.... What are the pitfalls?

    We have been utilising an ISP for many years to host our e-mails. They provide a basic POP3 service, which has suited our small company well in the past. We are now getting to the stage where we would like to host our own mails, to simplify the setting of out of office responses etc. On a whole lot of research, we have decided on a product called Mailenable - it is easy to configure, works like a bomb, and provides all the functionality we are looking for.

    Mailenable permits you to have IMAP mailboxes as opposed to POP3. There are some advantages of this that I can see, but also a few problems...

    We use Outlook for our mail handling. Some people use more of the programme than others, and some less. Everyone has a contact list, and most people use their calendars for appointments, meetings etc. Some people synchronise these with their Cell phones (Nokia / Blackberry etc).

    Using IMAP mailboxes would mean that the mail remains on the server for a specified period of time (or until deleted), and synchronised with the person's Outlook folders. I assume that this would mean that you need different profiles for each mailbox if you use IMAP. This would be a distinct change in the way we use our e-mail - we have our mail downloaded to Outlook into one large local PST file - that needs to be backed up locally across the network.

    Some of us have more than one e-mail address - at different domains. Currently these mails are simply downloaded into a common Inbox within Outlook, and dealt with that way. This would have to change if we were to start using IMAP? How do you connect to more than one IMAP mailbox, and manage your mails?

    I am on unknown territory here, so your help is very much appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Unless you are really set on Mailenable, you out want to consider Office 365. Check the Exchange online part of the site. There are many price points with Office 365 depending on all the capabilities you need.

    If you are set on Mailenable make sure you compare the capabilities of all the SKUs. And remember that there are other costs associated with hosting your own email. Hardware, operating sytem, support, day-to-day operations, backup, disaster recovery, possible legal requirements.

    Joe

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photorer View Post
    Using IMAP mailboxes would mean that the mail remains on the server for a specified period of time (or until deleted), and synchronised with the person's Outlook folders. I assume that this would mean that you need different profiles for each mailbox if you use IMAP. This would be a distinct change in the way we use our e-mail - we have our mail downloaded to Outlook into one large local PST file - that needs to be backed up locally across the network.

    Some of us have more than one e-mail address - at different domains. Currently these mails are simply downloaded into a common Inbox within Outlook, and dealt with that way. This would have to change if we were to start using IMAP? How do you connect to more than one IMAP mailbox, and manage your mails?
    I think you'd have multiple inboxes but not multiple profiles, as Outlook can handle multiple IMAP accounts.

    What's the real advantage to you of IMAP over POP3? Capability of shared folders?

    Bruce

  4. #4
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    Bruce,
    I just switched to IMAP from POP3, mainly to facilitate syncing with my Windows Phone. When I first set it up I was unsure of what I was getting into so I left my POP3 account settings in tact. BIG MISTAKE!. I suddenly and as I should have expected now had a whole bunch of extra e-mail account...LOL Stupid ME!.
    Ok long story short I backed up Outlook '07, making extra note that the e-mail was backed up, then deleted my POP 3 accounts (2), and redid them to IMAP, and all is working as it should. I did have to reset all of my rules, as the mail came back in, so that the mail went to the appropriate sub folders, but that wasn't any big deal.
    I am using Outlook '07 Desktop Client only, no server.
    Thanks John
    Teamwork is essential; it gives the enemy other people to shoot at. (Murphy's War Laws #39)

  5. #5
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    As far as I can tell, MailEnable also supports POP3, even in the free version.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photorer View Post
    We have been utilising an ISP for many years to host our e-mails. They provide a basic POP3 service, which has suited our small company well in the past. We are now getting to the stage where we would like to host our own mails, to simplify the setting of out of office responses etc. On a whole lot of research, we have decided on a product called Mailenable - it is easy to configure, works like a bomb, and provides all the functionality we are looking for.

    Mailenable permits you to have IMAP mailboxes as opposed to POP3. There are some advantages of this that I can see, but also a few problems...

    We use Outlook for our mail handling. Some people use more of the programme than others, and some less. Everyone has a contact list, and most people use their calendars for appointments, meetings etc. Some people synchronise these with their Cell phones (Nokia / Blackberry etc).

    Using IMAP mailboxes would mean that the mail remains on the server for a specified period of time (or until deleted), and synchronised with the person's Outlook folders. I assume that this would mean that you need different profiles for each mailbox if you use IMAP. This would be a distinct change in the way we use our e-mail - we have our mail downloaded to Outlook into one large local PST file - that needs to be backed up locally across the network.

    Some of us have more than one e-mail address - at different domains. Currently these mails are simply downloaded into a common Inbox within Outlook, and dealt with that way. This would have to change if we were to start using IMAP? How do you connect to more than one IMAP mailbox, and manage your mails?

    I am on unknown territory here, so your help is very much appreciated.
    You can't specify the inbox for a MAPI account - each one will have it's own inbox, so the inboxes will be created. You can, however, create rules to move messages to the "common" inbox. If that was the case, you could just keep the IMAP folder structure collapsed, which won't be a big bother, actually. You may also have other rules applied, to move to other folders or do some other stuff.

    As I said, however, if your choice is MailEnable, you can keep using POP.

  7. #7
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    OK - thanks for the replies...
    It appears that I should still continue with pop3 mailboxes, rather than switching to IMAP. It appears that POP mailboxes are more flexible to deal with, and there are also plenty of opportunities to back up my PST file over our network at the office or at home. (This is what I currently do).

    Since my PST file is really huge (it went over 10Gb last week) I would spend an inordinate amount of time synchronising the folders to the IMAP server, and there would also be quite a few extra folders to manage when it comes to my multiple e-mail accounts.

    With IMAP, when you invoke the Outlook archive system, does this create a local PST archive only, and then reduce the size of synchronised folders that connect to the IMAP server? If that is the case, then I could reduce the size of the IMAP folders drastically (I have a lot of old clutter!).

  8. #8
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    I don't like IMAP. I keep Outlook's .pst file small by archiving and compacting, I use one .pst per year.

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