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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    SMTP - ISP versus hosting company?

    This is a general query.

    For SMTP purposes, should I use my ISP's outgoing mail server or my hosting company's ?

    Your thoughts are welcome.

    Regards

    Brendan

  2. #2
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    I'd use whoever is hosting the email.

    Joe

  3. #3
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    If you are running the mail server on a hosted server then the mail server is responsible for sending SMTP messages.
    If you are setting up a mail client on your PC then use the ISP's server.
    If you are using web mail (Google, MS) and are connecting your mail client to the webmail, the answer is, it depends. Some webmail providers allow external access to the SMTP server, some don't.

    cheers, Paul

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul T For This Useful Post:

    bmoran007 (2012-02-27)

  5. #4
    New Lounger
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    Hi thanks for replies.

    One of the advantages about using your hosting company is that if you are mobile and using different methods to access the internet you do not need to change your SMTP settings.

    File sizes of attachments can also vary from provider to provider.

    If you are sending out a marketing e-mail can also be restrictions on the number of addressees.

    One of the big problem is whether your provider has fallen foul of any of the Anti SPAM blacklisters (SORBS etc) - this can be a nightmare to unravel and unblock.

    Any further thoughts welcome.

    Regards

    Brendan Moran

  6. #5
    New Lounger
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    Hosting in, ISP out

    I intentionally use different servers for inbound and outbound SMTP/POP mail. Here is why: My ISP is Comcast and they are VERY aggressive about blocking spam. They block some legitimate, non-spam inbound email, and no amount of whitelisting, turning off filtering, or calls to tech support could prevent it. So I have inbound mail sent to my hosting company, then use the Outlook mail client to pick it up using SMTP/POP3. The hosting company has never blocked legit mail to me that I am aware of.

    But the hosting company's lower threshold for spam is a mixed blessing. Occasionally, their entire address range gets listed on a blackhole list. When that happens, mail sent via their servers is rejected by most ISPs and some companies. So now I use Comcast's servers for sending mail, and Comcast is almost never blackholed (and when they are, they fix the problem immediately).

    I know that this is a little odd, but it works well. It is not hard to set up, since Outlook can easily accommodate different hosts in different domains for the incoming and outgoing server. Comcast may wonder why I send mail but never receive any, and the ISP may wonder why I receive mail and never send any. I almost never have to call Comcast's non-existent support for mail, and the hosting company is very responsive on inbound mail problems, so splitting the traffic is not a support problem.

    When I need to, such as when traveling, I can still send mail via the hosting company using either webmail or having a separate account set up in Outlook. And I have Outlook check the Comcast server for mail occasionally, but there as almost nothing there other than Comcast promotions.

    This setup may not be the best for everyone, but it works for me and I mention it to show that you can use different servers and companies for inbound and outbound mail. The best choice for your inbound server may not be your best choice for your outbound server.

    Cheers.

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    bmoran007 (2012-02-27),Mike Feury (2012-03-01)

  8. #6
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    I have had a Demon.co.uk email address for many years, since I originally had their dial-up (remember modems!!).
    Obviously since then I have been hooked up to many different home ISP's.

    I travel a lot for my job, and use AuthSMTP to facilitate SMTP posting from anywhere, as I also don't use Exchange or other servers.
    Very cheap and works perfectly.

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    bmoran007 (2012-02-27)

  10. #7
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    You can use Google to handle your hosted email. Excellent spam blocking and no trouble with blacklists.

    Don't go down the plain vanilla gmail route to handle your hosted mail (you'll get a "somebody@gmail on behalf of somebody@xyz" message header which looks very unprofessional).

    No, instead sign up to Google Apps: Its free for up to 10 users. Change your MX records with your existing hosting company to point to the gmail servers and away you go.

    Not many people know about the free service, but when implemented correctly it's seamless and really effective.

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    bmoran007 (2012-02-27)

  12. #8
    2 Star Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinto Tech View Post
    sign up to Google Apps: Its free for up to 10 users. Change your MX records with your existing hosting company to point to the gmail servers and away you go. ... it's seamless and really effective.
    That's exactly the setup I've been using for my most important email accounts for a few years now. Excellent indeed, better than any host or ISP I'd used previously.

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