Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22
  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,070
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 132 Times in 86 Posts

    Office Q&A: Image wrangling in Word 2010




    TOP STORY

    Office Q&A: Image wrangling in Word 2010


    By Katherine Murray

    We include pictures in everything — from blog posts to annual reports to letters to Grandma.

    But easy as it is to insert pictures into a doc, we're often flummoxed by how to keep them exactly where we want them. This article explores a few of the maddening Word picture-placement issues our readers (and editors) have faced.

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/top-story/Office-Q-amp-A-Image-wrangling-in-Word-2010/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Kathleen Atkins; 2013-06-26 at 18:10.

  2. #2
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New Plymouth, New Zealand
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Use Microsoft Publisher (if you can afford to buy it), and, in this regard, all your worries will be over.

    Dic

  3. #3
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi
    Good article, I'd like to suggest a couple of improvements:

    - The Word 'default' setting to insert pictures in line with text is not the default in all cases. This default has changed over different Word versions and if Word is installed as part of a corporate desktop they may also have changed the default setting. It'd be good to let people know they can control this setting under File -> Word Options -> Advanced Options -> Cut, Copy, and Paste.

    - I can see why you advise people to put a picture and its caption inside a text box, but I think it's better to use a Drawing Canvas. In my experience users have the most trouble with diagrams or combinations of pictures on a page, maybe with arrows and text as well. A drawing canvas is the general purpose solution to this - it ensures all the related drawing items, text and pictures stay together at all times. The advice you give about in-line vs. floating items then works well for the overall 'graphic'.

    Cheers
    Marty

  4. #4
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    For my thesis, a combination of lots of images and lack of funding made me pick OpenOffice 3 instead of Word. The functions for image placing and image captioning are far better than any version of Microsoft Word, and you can trust that what you put in your document stays put. /Mats G

  5. #5
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I was using Word 2010 recently to print onto a sheet of labels using the built in template. Each label required an image placed behind the text but as soon as I selected the 'behind text' option the images would jump all over the place. I would move an image into the correct position only to find that another image would move somewhere else then when I moved that image back the first image would move. I solved this by clicking on the 'position' button and selecting 'More Layout Options...' where I discovered that the default layout options were Horizontal to the right of 'Column' and Vertical below 'Paragraph'. After changing both 'Column' and 'Paragraph' to 'Page' I found that the images stayed where I had placed them.

  6. #6
    New Lounger dpm39560's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central Mississippi
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    I was hoping this article would tell us how to change the default image placement from inline to one of the floating options. Alas, I was disappointed, and I fear it's not the author's lack, but Microsoft's. It would also be good to be able to change the default image placement from Paragraph to Page, but again, MS falls short.

    However, the good news is I picked up a great tip about placing images (and their captions if needed) into TEXT BOXES, which I believe default to floating and PAGE placement. This could solve all my issues with images, albeit with the hassle of the extra step of adding a text box. Now, if only we could get the text box add tool to default to our choice (transparent) instead of forcing us to choose it from a list each time...

    Sigh.
    David P. Miller
    Central Mississippi
    Be not weary in well doing, for in due time
    you shall reap the harvest, if you faint not.

  7. #7
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Another way to deal with graphics in Word

    Word is really bad at dealing with graphics. My solution has been to put graphics in a table, which keeps them on the text layer. A 2-cell table allows insertion of a caption below or to the side, which also stays with the graphic. You can mark the caption for tables of contents without too much trouble as well. The nice thing about using table cells for graphics is that you can easily arrange two or more graphics within one figure as needed.

    By using the table formatting features you can position the graphic, arrange for text wrapping, and fix the size of the cell.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to dmageol@msn.com For This Useful Post:

    bobprimak (2012-04-19)

  9. #8
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Tri-Cities, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    deja vu

    I first heard most of this article when I switched from WordPerfect to Word in the middle 1990s. Still can't believe it!
    For informal documentation and intuitive picture handling, WordPad works well.

  10. #9
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Dic View Post
    Use Microsoft Publisher (if you can afford to buy it), and, in this regard, all your worries will be over.

    Dic
    I have a friend who works in the printing industry. He says that he is often unable to work with materials presented to his company in the outputs from Microsoft Publisher. Just one reason that Publisher may not be a panacea for these sorts of issues.
    -- Bob Primak --

  11. #10
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by matgei View Post
    For my thesis, a combination of lots of images and lack of funding made me pick OpenOffice 3 instead of Word. The functions for image placing and image captioning are far better than any version of Microsoft Word, and you can trust that what you put in your document stays put. /Mats G
    As long as you don't need 100 percent compatibility with Office formats, this is a good tip. But be aware that if the person reading the thesis is using Office instead of OpenOffice, all that formatting work may be lost, as images in particular do not always display the same in the two office suites. The differences are not trivial in heavily formatted documents with images, tables and the likes.
    -- Bob Primak --

  12. #11
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by jerrimain View Post
    I first heard most of this article when I switched from WordPerfect to Word in the middle 1990s. Still can't believe it!
    For informal documentation and intuitive picture handling, WordPad works well.
    WordPad is great for short documents (a few pages or less) with just basic formatting requirements. Anything bigger or more complex will not be suitable. That said, I use WordPad for almost all online web postings requiring formatting. I just would not use it for longer posts in my blog, or complete articles being submitted for online publication.
    -- Bob Primak --

  13. #12
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by dpm39560 View Post
    I was hoping this article would tell us how to change the default image placement from inline to one of the floating options. Alas, I was disappointed, and I fear it's not the author's lack, but Microsoft's. It would also be good to be able to change the default image placement from Paragraph to Page, but again, MS falls short.

    However, the good news is I picked up a great tip about placing images (and their captions if needed) into TEXT BOXES, which I believe default to floating and PAGE placement. This could solve all my issues with images, albeit with the hassle of the extra step of adding a text box. Now, if only we could get the text box add tool to default to our choice (transparent) instead of forcing us to choose it from a list each time...

    Sigh.
    Make a custom Office Template for your preferred options, and save it as your default Office Template for Word documents. The process is pretty straightforward, but it's been awhile since I've used Office, so I'll have to refer you to this article .
    -- Bob Primak --

  14. #13
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by bobprimak View Post
    I have a friend who works in the printing industry. He says that he is often unable to work with materials presented to his company in the outputs from Microsoft Publisher. Just one reason that Publisher may not be a panacea for these sorts of issues.
    I have worked extensively with Publisher for 6 years and it is so much better than Word for any kind of object work. As "Dic" says your worries will be over and I second that statement. I find Bob's remark interesting as I never had any problems with my copy at printing establishments. The key was to print the final copy to a PDF document and email it for printing. Never a glitch or a problem. What "outputs" were a problem?

  15. #14
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Good tips. Here are a couple more I've found useful over the years.

    I've found that using Frames works more reliably than Text Boxes for placing graphics and their captions, at least in versions of Word prior to 2010 (my company hasn't upgraded past 2007 yet). You still can control placement and include captions. An important benefit of frames is that they are located in the text layer (not the graphics layer), so you can use cross referencing to reference the automatically generated figure number in the captions (which, at least in 2007 and earlier, you can't do in a text box). There are at least two ways to create frames I know of. Text boxes can be converted to frames by right-clicking on the text box border and selecting Format Text Box and then selecting Layout tab and clicking on advanced then convert to frame. That's the hard way. However, the easy way is to add the Create Frame button to the Quick Access toolbar. Then select what you want in the frame and click on the button.

    Also, when any floating object's anchor is visible, you don't need to cut and paste the graphic to move the anchor. Just grab the anchor itself and move it to the paragraph you want. Can sometimes be tricky if you move from one page to the next, but generally it works OK. You can also lock the anchor to a particular paragraph if you like. That's in the format frame, format text box, format graphic layout selections. I want to stress that if you delete an entire paragraph that has a graphic anchored to it, the graphic goes as well. Move the anchor first. Also, check the anchor position if you get unexplained white space near a graphic. As noted in the article, the anchor and the graphic have to be on the same page. You may want to move the anchor to a different paragraph to let the white space fill in.

  16. #15
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by dmageol@msn.com View Post
    Word is really bad at dealing with graphics. My solution has been to put graphics in a table, which keeps them on the text layer. A 2-cell table allows insertion of a caption below or to the side, which also stays with the graphic. You can mark the caption for tables of contents without too much trouble as well. The nice thing about using table cells for graphics is that you can easily arrange two or more graphics within one figure as needed.

    By using the table formatting features you can position the graphic, arrange for text wrapping, and fix the size of the cell.
    That's a good tip for where you want to keep a single piece of text with a graphic.

    For multiple graphics plus text, arrows etc, use a drawing canvas (see FlipFlop's tip), this works much better than a text box and allows placement either inline or floating anywhere on the page.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •