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  1. #1
    4 Star Lounger
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    Spaces look like Superscript o

    Sometimes when I copy and paste, the space symbol, which is just a dot, turns into something that looks like a superscript o. Not all the spaces, just some of them. It still acts like a space and as far as I know there is no difference. If I turn off the formatting marks, all looks fine, but it just bugs me. I do change them to a regular space.

    I am using Word 2003 but this also happens in other versions. Any ideas? Thx.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Donebb,

    If this NonBreakingSpace.JPGis what you are talking about you can fix it by using Find & Replace and entering a ^s as the Find what: and a single space as the Replace with:.
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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  3. #3
    Silver Lounger Charles Kenyon's Avatar
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    To explain a bit further, a non-breaking space is a space that will not end a line when Word wraps your text. It is used when you have two words that should stay on the same line, like a first and last name or the day and month in a date. If not at the end of a line, they act exactly like regular spaces.
    Charles Kyle Kenyon
    Madison, Wisconsin

  4. #4
    5 Star Lounger kmurdock's Avatar
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    And to explain just a little bit further still, in case you'd actually like to use a non-breaking space on purpose, you can insert one in the document by holding down both the Ctrl and Shift keys and pressing the spacebar.

    Kim

  5. #5
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    And if you actually want a superscript o, perhaps for 25C or 81F, you can do it by holding down the Alt key and typing 248 on the (enabled) numeric keyboard, then releasing the Alt key. (Check if this works in your locale!)
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

  6. #6
    Star Lounger
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    Actually, in all the fonts that I use—I'm in Australia—Alt 0176 produces the degree mark.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    No doubt, but my suggestion saves 20% (or 25%) of the key-pressing!
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

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