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  1. #1
    Star Lounger Ibex's Avatar
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    My Vista saga continues ... Part 2 - dead in the water

    Well, as my luck would have it, my Vista OS died completely yesterday. The straw that broke the camel's back was the earlier attempted installation of a wireless USB adaptor. The installation didn't complete because my browswer decided to go on strike. The very next time that I started the computer it crashed. And it did that each time that I tried to restart it. Great! (I let fly with a tirade of colorful language that would have made a waterfront worker blush.) My operating system was dead in the water.

    Luckily I had purchased a copy of Vista on Ebay, but I wasn't all that clued up on how to install it. I bumbled my way through the installation and managed to get it right. However, my machine is useless right now. It doesn't know how to do anything. Nothing! All it does is start up and give me messages about its lack of capabilities as I try to operate various files. I guess that I knew this would happen. It needs drivers! It needs applications! Yeah OK, I sighed. Most of the stuff on my machine came preloaded, including the OS, so it will be fun putting things back, and in the right places too. I don't have a Vista manual, so guesswork and trial and error are going to be my methods of operation. So your forum will be my lifeline as I restore my machine back to full health.

    Vista is NOT XP, and doesn't follow all the XP rules. 'Dragging and dropping' things does not always work. I saved as many files as I could to an external drive. One of my first problems will be how to reinstall them. They won't spontaniously jump to life as I drag them back into the Vista environment. So here is one of my first requests. Can somebody please give me a set of guidelines for the reinstallation of files from an external storage drive into the Vista environment?

    Thanks for you time.
    Last edited by Ibex; 2012-06-01 at 21:20.

  2. #2
    Star Lounger Ibex's Avatar
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    I've managed to connect the Vista machine to the Net. It was a breeze now that the operating system has been reloaded. There was a big problem with the installation of an office package, and I'm not sure if it qualifies as a Vista prolem or a general problem relating to the package itself. We will come to that a little later.

    I was able to install paid-for programs from the Net like antiviral applicatiions, registry cleaners and various drivers and codecs. I had no trouble with these. These applications virtually loaded themselves. This also told me that the newly reloaded Vista operating system was seemingly doing its job. Now we come to the fly in the ointment. And it's the chief reason for my addition to this thread. I don't know if one is allowed to mention a product by name on this forum, so I will call it Applicatiion X. (You no doubt will work it out for yourselves anyway.)

    Now the licensing of that product allows/allowed me to have this application on two computers at the same time. This was exactly what I had prior to formatting my hard drive and reloading the OS. In other words, I had this application on both my Vista and XP machines. The application had worked without a problem. But when I tried to reinstall it onto my Vista machine, even though the applications product key was correct, it ultimately failed. I was told that the initially accepted product key was incorrect and I had to uninstall the application. I have gone through this a total of six times, and I don't mind telling you, I'm tired and frustrated. Trying to contact the application's manufacturer is impossible. But is he at fault? Previosly I could install this item without a hitch. Something tells me that the operating system may be the culprit in this, but who do I ask about this except you people of the forum? There is nobody else to ask. What might be amiss with the Vista OS that could prevent the loading of certain software that it accepted before? Bare in mind too that the application was loaded from an uncorrupted sauce, a DVD installation disc.

    Thanks
    Last edited by Ibex; 2012-06-02 at 08:40.

  3. #3
    Star Lounger Ibex's Avatar
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    Hi,
    There has been a breakthrough in relation to Application X. All of you had worked out, no doubt, that it was MS Office. I didn't think that I was allowed to mention the actuall application, but this is not advertising or lible, it is a matter of public interest. How? Well, you might be in the same situation one day, or you may have been in one in the past. What ever. I did get onto MS eventually. It wasn't all that easy because their phone numbers aren't readily advertised. OK. What I found out was that I had a pirate copy of MS Office. I was stunned. It looked absolutely authentic. The installation discs had holograms; the plastic case was exactly like the real thing; the product key actually worked when I first got it. The people who created it knew their craft well. But when I tried to reinstall it a year and a half later, the product key was rejected because it was bogus. Of course I was angry and argued with MS. How could a product key become bogus when at first it was accepted? Finally they convinced me that my copy was a pirate copy. "So what happens next? "I asked them in a very annoyed tone, seeing images of my money and software application going into the trash bin. (I would have deluged them with endless letters of complaint if they fobbed me off over this.) Well they took down my details: identity, address, phone number,etc., and gave me a web site to visit. I think it was called HOW TO TELL.COM, which is their web site for the lodgement of details about pirate software. I lodged a report which included the identity of the vendor who sold me the software, the amount charged for it, and how the transaction was made. I later received an email from MS to say that my report was received. I now have to send in details of the transaction and also the pirate software to them. They will replace it within five to six weeks with the real thing. Phew.

    There is an obvious lesson to be learned here, and that is to always keep your receipts and other associated details of your transactions with vendors who sell you things, particularly software! You may think that you have a genuine article when you could just have a pirated copy that could cause problems later. You can't always tell the difference.

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