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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    SSD BIOS Not Detected

    I just finished an SSD install on my Windows 7 desktop. I used Paragon Migrate OS to SSD to copy the OS from my C-partition to the SSD. (Best $20 I ever spent.) However, when I rebooted & looked in my BIOS to set the SSD to be the boot device, it was not there. To review: I had my old C-partition as the active, boot drive, my D-partition as active, & the new SSD as active (I think it was drive H). On a whim I decided to remove all the HDDs connected to my MoBo & rebooted the system to see if it would boot. Amazingly, the pc booted to Windows with just the SSD (not unexpected). It was now the active, boot drive. I shutdown, connected the HDDs & restarted the system. Everything worked!

    My question is - what happened to make the new SSD the boot drive? I didn't do anything other than to power down the original C-partition.

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  3. #2
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Depends on your BIOS. Some of them will automatically go to the next drive in the hard drive order if the first one fails or is missing. Had a motherboard with this feature and it drove me nuts for awhile when I had a boot hard disk that was slow to spin up sometimes.

    Jerry

  4. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I would think there may have been a problem with the MBR, although that's just a guess. What OS's were in C and D? There may have been some limiting factor on the MoBo itself.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
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    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  5. #4
    5 Star Lounger
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    Only one drive can be set as active otherwise it will look at only the first drive connected by date.Thats why it started working when you had only the SSD connected as then it became the first drive registered.
    Clive

    All typing errors are my own work and subject to patents pending. Except errors by the spell checker. And that has its own patients.

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    LeoR (2012-07-28)

  7. #5
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Clive, I think you meant only 1 partition can be marked active, any number of disks can, boot choice can then be made via the BIOS or a boot loader on the #1 boot drive.

    I suspect that LeoR's 'problem' stemmed from the fact that he retained both 'identical' drives in the machine post -cloning. Normally one would shutdown, disconnect the donor drive then boot to the new drive to test.

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    LeoR (2012-07-28)

  9. #6
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    satrow probably hit on the reason, but whichever, glad you discovered how to make this work.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
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  10. #7
    New Lounger
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    Thanks for the replies & explanation about the registration dates.

    Just to complete the story, I'm only using Windows 7, so the old & new C-partitions were identical (D-partition is used for data & apps). Satrow understands what I did.

    I'm not an expert like some of you guys, but I know enough, I guess, to get myself into trouble. You can probably tell that by my next set of questions.

    When the pc boots does it look to boot from the partition with the "C" label? I noticed during my troubleshooting that my old C-partition was labeled C, my D-partition was labeled D, and the new SSD was labeled H. After I fixed the problem, the SSD took on the C-label and the old-C became H. Could I have also fixed it by relabeling the partitions?

  11. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    No, The C Label is automatically given the active partition. If you are booted to Win 7 on old HD that will be C Drive, if you are booted to SSD, that will be C Drive.

    In my case when I'm booted to Win 7 it's listed as C Drive with Win 8 RP as E Drive, when I'm booted to Win 8 RP it is listed as C Drive with Win 7 as D Drive.

    BootedWin8RP.jpg


    bootWIn 7.jpg

    I have 3 partitions with a Data partition mixed in as well.
    Last edited by Medico; 2012-07-28 at 11:52.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

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    LeoR (2012-07-30)

  13. #9
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    C: = the active System drive, where the Windows you have booted into is located. It's quite easy in a mixed partition or drive setup to have the Active partition being referred to as E: or higher and even to have the Boot partition as E: or higher. It's not uncommon to find a drive with 3 or more partitions, one being Active, another being Boot and the third being C: with System, Page file and Crash dump.

    C: = Windows (System partition), D: first optical drive, if fitted, E: first partition on a second drive, F: second partition on the first drive, ... there is a 'logical' order.

    Here are my 'simple' drives as seen by Disk Manager in Linear mode; I set the HDD as G: because I frequently connect 1 or 2 other drives to backup to and this allows space for them between the System and Data drives. No separate hidden Boot partition (Windows 7 install default) - if something goes wrong, there's only one partition to think about and to recover!
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    LeoR (2012-07-30)

  15. #10
    New Lounger
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    Understood. Thanks.

  16. #11
    4 Star Lounger
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    Don't forget that you can choose which drive you are booting from by tapping a key, such as Esc or F12 (depending on your machine), and you can set a default drive to look at first in the boot sequence. You can boot from floppy, as the earliest PCs did, or from CD/DVD which is usual when 'you are in trouble', or you can boot from USB, which is very convenient.

    You can boot any computer to an entirely different operating system, such as Linux, from CD or USB, which I encourage you to try. Some of the best troubleshooting tools are available under those systems. If you like it, you might switch to a dual boot setup. See the relevant forum here for ideas.

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