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    Drive size mismatch between disk manager and OS

    I just upgraded my laptop harddrive from 100gb to 320 gb. Took it to a tech who put the original and new hard drives on his "disk copy" machine which is supposed to do block by block copy of the old drive to the new one.

    When all was done, installed the new drive. Disk manager said that there is a 320 (or thereabouts) partition and that it is healthy. C drive is defined in that partitition.

    However, when I query windows about the C drive, it says only 111 gb total capacity. I thought maybe it was just a reporting issue in the OS, so copied a 10 GB file a few times to try and see how far it would go. It went to 110 gb and then said the drive was indeed full.

    Has anyone seen this before and knows a way around it? Trying to use the disk manager in Windows 7 to shrink the partition and then expand it again gives "parameter error" when trying to shrink the partition.

    Windows 7, service pack 1 and all current updates applied, latest bios installed on a Dell M6300 laptop.
    Darrel Damon

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    Quote Originally Posted by darreldamon View Post
    Disk manager said that there is a 320 (or thereabouts) partition and that it is healthy. C drive is defined in that partitition.
    What do you mean by Disk manager? "Disk Manager" is a third-party program, but it sounds like you could possibly be talking about the "Disk Management" snap-in in Windows instead.



    Took it to a tech who put the original and new hard drives on his "disk copy" machine which is supposed to do block by block copy of the old drive to the new one.
    Well, a "block-by-block copy" is going to result in a destination partition exactly the same size as the original--IOW, the target hard disk would end up with a 100GB partition and 200GB+ of "unallocated" space. Offhand, I don't think that's what the tech maybe did, but your terminology makes it a bit ambiguous, so clarification would be helpful.

    In "Computer", right-click the C: drive and choose Properties. What does it say for capacity and used space?

    Are you also looking at Win7's own "Disk Management" window? If so, look at the bar-graph schematic in Disk Mgmt's lower-right pane. On the left end of the schematic it should say "Disk 0"; what else does it say below the "Disk 0"? To the right of that it should show blocks representing Disk 0's partitions. How many, and what does it say on each block?



    Has anyone seen this before and knows a way around it? Trying to use the disk manager in Windows 7 to shrink the partition and then expand it again gives "parameter error" when trying to shrink the partition.

    Windows 7, service pack 1 and all current updates applied, latest bios installed on a Dell M6300 laptop.
    I've seem similar symptoms on XP-era Dell Inspiron laptops, but those idiosyncrasies shouldn't be applicable to the Precision series. There must be something else going on.

    Trying to guess how old your laptop might be . . . the Dell website shows only XP and Vista drivers for the Precision M6300, which usually implies that model never shipped from the factory with Win7. Did yours come with Win7, or was that a user upgrade later? (What version is on the COA sticker on the bottom of the laptop?)


    Dan

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    As mentioned above, a disk copy machine will make the new drive space the same as the old. As a side note, you can't use it to copy a larger disk to a smaller one.

    Try running the disk error checking tool. The disk copier copies exactly what it found on the original disk, so your machine may believe the disk is only 100GB. A full error check should find and correct any isssues.

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    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    What file system is used? Examples include FAT/FAT32/NTFS.

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Disk Management (the Win 7 app) should, as mentioned previously, show the 100 Gb partition that Win 7 was loaded in, and the unallocated space. The unallocated space should be behind the Win 7 partition. If so you can simply resize the Win 7 partition and include the unallocated space in with the Win 7 partition.

    However, another option would be to format the unallocated space and use this as a second logical partition that you could, perhaps, move all your data into. This would isolate your data from the system and apps partition so that if your OS becomes corrupted and need to be restored, your data will not be affected at all. PC World shows the proper way to move your data to a separate partition. Life hacker shows the reasons why we separate our data and OS.

    This way after you start creating Images of your OS (see the Security and Backup Forum for many discussions of Imaging) and have to restore from an Image, you data remains safe in it's own partition.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
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    Ted is correct, and it might be a good time to recommend either of two freeware partitioning tools which will show you what is really going on (so you can see the unallocated space, for example, or run a surface scan): Easus Partition Master Home Edition or MiniTool Partition Manager.

    Strictly speaking, especially if you are going to mess with your boot drive, you should run these from a flash drive or CD, but you have to install the program to reach that point anyway, and new partitions after the first are simple enough to skip the extra drive provided you back up first.

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I have both these 3rd party tools although I use the Partition Wizard Mini Tool much more often as it was the first such tool I acquired. The 3rd party tools generally have many more features than the comparable Win 7 built in tools. For example the Win 7 tool is unable to resize to unallocated space in front of the chosen partition because this would involve moving the data in the partition outside Windows. The 3rd party tools can do this. I've used Partition Wizard for this chore several times. I usually delete the Manufacturer's Recovery Partition since I use Imaging. Since this partition resides in front of Windows, the Win 7 built in tool is unable to recover this space.

    I have actually done this from within Windows 7 using Partition Wizard. I have not actually tried it by booting to a DVD, hmmm, something else to try eventually.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
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    The idea of the bootable media to run the utility is that the physical disk you are operating on is strictly a slave, which keeps you out of trouble.

    One commercial product I have which I should mention is Acronis Disk Director 11, which I think is thirty bucks if you qualify for an upgrade (from version 10). This is an impressive product, since it supports a large number of formatting options including all the Linux stuff, and if you make a boot disk or flash drive for Acronis TrueImage, this can be installed on the same drive right alongside it. The whole works will fit on a remarkably small flash drive. (I seem to recall that you are an Acronis enthusiast, and if you can get it at a good price you'd love this.)

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    Same problem in Windows 7 Enterprise and brand new USB drive

    I have the same mismatch in Windows 7 Enterprise with a brand new USB drive. It is a 1TB USB drive and in Windows 7 it looks like this under properties:
    JDisk.JPG

    and in Disk Management it looks like this:
    Jdisk2.JPG

    what's up with that? The only thing I can figure is the disk was initialized by Bit Locker repair tool which decrypted another USB drive to this 1TB USB drive. How do I get my un-allocated space back?

    New Information:
    The problem was BitLocker repair tool. All I had to do was move the files off the 1TB drive, do a quick reformat and I was able to reclaim all the unallocated space. Now Windows properties matches Windows disk management. Issue closed.
    Last edited by pmac1000; 2014-02-21 at 15:31.

  10. #10
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    New to me is yet another partitioning program (which must have been around for some time, given that it is at version 5.5) AOMEI which has the priceless feature of allowing you to create a Windows To Go drive without requiring the Enterprise Starship Version. I successfully created one on a portable hard drive, but have had no luck so far in attempts to create one on a flash drive and an external SSD.

    Sorry I can't help with the original question, but anyone on the list for this might be interested in that.

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