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  1. #1
    Lounger
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    A new and better way to GUARANTEE files can be undeleted

    FOR FRED LANGA (see P.S. at the end of this post)

    Back in the good old days (2002), Norton Utilities contained a wonderful tool which I still use on a Windows XP system. It was called Norton Protect or Unerase, and it worked by intercepting Windows' Recycle Bin. Files which were deleted -- even with Shift-Delete or from the command line -- were kept in a safe place. From time to time, the user could empty the Norton Protect folder, to create extra space on the drive. I don't know when this was dropped from Norton Utilities, but it was -- and still is -- a valuable product.

    Yes, there are excellent undelete tools like Recuva, but they work on the basis of crossing your fingers behind your back and hoping you get there in time before the file gets overwritten. Then there is Windows 7 with "Previous Versions," but that works only if a backup was done after the file was created AND before it was deleted. Once again, one is depending on a lucky break.

    Thanks to the excellent blog at http://www.raymond.cc/blog/undeluxe-...deleted-files/, I learned about a new tool that does the same job as Norton Protect: Undeluxe. It comes in a free version and a paid version. For more information and to download, go to: http://www.resplendence.com/undeluxe. The free version is fully functional, and in the absence of anything to the contrary on the owner's website, acceptable for use on business computers. The free version's limitation is the inability to change configuration.

    I draw attention to the helpful note in the comments on Raymond's page about how to run Undeluxe (free) automatically when Windows starts: "Hi Ray, You don’t have to do anything manually [to make Undeluxe run automatically]. Just place a shortcut for Undeluxe Control Center in the startup folder and add “/start” in the Target field in the shortcut. This will run the software when Windows boots and also start the file protection."

    Final note: Don't worry: your hard drive won't clog up with gigabytes of deleted files: Undeluxe removes files after they are 10 days old. The idea is that the "Oops! I wish I hadn't done that" moment will occur before those 10 days have elapsed.

    - Bruce Fraser

    P.S. About adding "FOR FRED LANGA" at the start of this post. I don't see anywhere on the WindowsSecrets website the means to write to a specific editor, and I didn't want to hijack the "WS Columns Forum" which is supposed to respond to particular columns, not start new material. Am I missing something, or is this a feature which WS might add in the future?

    Last edited by Bruce Fraser; 2012-06-26 at 20:13. Reason: Added "Final note"

  2. #2
    Lounger
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    Update to my original post:

    While Undeluxe can be started automatically as described above, it annoyingly sits in a window. It can be minimized by clicking the appropriate icon on the title bar; but even then it takes up space on the task bar. It would be much nicer if it would just stay out of the way in the notification area (that's the official name; sometimes called the system tray).

    I searched, but found only a handful of free tools which can be configured to automatically minimize programs to the notification bar. Some of them are no longer being developed, such as Trayconizer (2003), Tray It! (2008), TrayEverything (2009), so I didn't even try them. But these ones are still active and may work: RBTray (www.moitah.net), HideIt (www.vasanrulez.deviantart.com/art/HideIt-Hide-all-your-windows-206517834). The one I use and can confirm that it does the job automtically is: Minimize to Tray Tool (www.4dots-software.com/minimizetotraytool).
    I understand the excellent Anvir Task Manager can also do this, but if that's all one uses it for, it's like using a sledgehammer to drive a nail.

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