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  1. #1
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    Recycle bin Problem

    Hello there

    I have another problem as this that I need the files and when I want to restore them there is nothing in recycle bin however when I click on empty recycle bin it asks if I want to delete 21 items or not.

    Plz help I need the files

    by the way I've deleted them from the external hard drive and now is not connected but again recycle bin is empty if I connect.

    any suggestion would be appriciated.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by dzvpnhvdnp View Post

    I have another problem as this that I need the files and when I want to restore them there is nothing in recycle bin
    Plz help I need the files

    by the way I've deleted them from the external hard drive and now is not connected but again recycle bin is empty if I connect.
    "dz",
    Hello....I'm not understanding your question ...
    1. If you need the files ...why are they in the "Recycle Bin"? How did they get there?

    2. When you click on the Recycle Bin, even if it shows "Empty" you will get a screen that shows what's in the "Bin"

    3. If you "Deleted" what was in the bin ...it will show empty.

    Your going to have to give more information before anyone can help.... Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  3. #3
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    1. I was reviewing the pictures and deleted(moving to recycle bin) them to use them later.

    2. yes, as I said it's empty but "it says do u want to delete 21 items" when I click on.

    3. I've deleted them (to recycle bin) not completely.

  4. #4
    4 Star Lounger
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    Maybe you can't see the files because you have file extensions hidden. To unhide them, do the following.

    1. Launch Windows Explorer and then at the top, click "Tools", go to "Folder Options", then click the "View" tab.
    2. Click the second radio button where it says "Show hidden files and folders".
    3. Next, remove the checkmark from "Hide file extensions for known file types".
    4. Click Apply/OK to exit.

    To restore a file from the Recycle bin, right click it and choose "Restore" from the menu. Windows will replace it in the location it was deleted from.

    However, if you delete files from an external source like a USB stick, they don't go to the Recycle bin and will be deleted permanently.

  5. #5
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    Even when you have deleted files from your machine, and then deleted them from the Recycle Bin, these files REMAIN on your Hard Disc Drive and are NOT gone, and they are completely recoverable if you follow certain procedures. When you delete a file, it is then mapped into the Recycle Bin's reserved space, commonly known as a folder or directory if you under 30, that is generally not readable by most if not all common file managers as they then have become protected system files and folders. There are some file managers which will read into these recycle bin directories but are few and far between. If you have one, you can both see the file and simply move it or copy elsewhere if you so chose. For those of you that do not have these tools, take heart, there are other means to recover these supposedly lost and gone forever files, IF you do not over write the released space on the partition until they have been recovered. Only the first four characters (bytes) of the file header are actually nulled so the allocation tables no longer can find the files and their pointers were released once they were removed from the Recycle Bin. Your data is STILL there, and intact, if you do not write to the disc partition where the files were located and thereby overwriting either the four missing bytes or some of or the rest of the data. There are many tools available to actually look for, find and recover these "lost" files usually without problem. They are typically known as Undeleters which were relatively common in the day of DOS, PICK, UNIX, XENIX, etc. With the advent of GUI's, technically savvy people faded into relative obscurity which is why hardly anyone knows about these tools anymore. M$'s DOS command Undelete.exe is a common example and most tool developers had their own versions to compete in the software tool universe such as PC TOOLS, and many other developers. Unfortunately, none of the older tools could cope with new Window"s longer file names larger than the common 8.3 lengths so they basically faded from view along with the low level (read as technically skilled) users since the goal was to turn computers and its hardware into toasters for the common man and sell them to the masses. Look around for Undeleters and you will find them. Use them to recover your deleted files and they will work. Just DO NOT write any data to the partition until you have used these tools. Hard Disc Drives typically write data to the closest physical track to Track 0 if it, or a portion of it, will fit in the first sector found empty, but if it is too big to write the entire file there it will continue to write the next block of data, usually 512 bytes to the next closest empty sector, and then the next closest empty, etc. until the complete file has been saved. This is why anyone who actually has a fairly active system can generate thousands, even millions of these "fragmented files" on their drives over a period of time. This will indeed slow your machine down, sometimes considerably because a standard, non-striped array hard disc drive can only read one sector of data at a time, again usually only 512 Bytes, per revolution since the head can not move to another sector fast enough (SCSI and some SATA drives have "elevator" seeking built in which can do more than one sector read or write, but not both, per revolution since it can talk to different platters at the same instant in time) which is usually loaded into the disc's buffer and then sent as a larger segment to memory and if the file has ten segments, the drive must spin ten times around to get the entire file read into buffer memory until either the entire file is loaded into the buffer or the buffer is full and is then sent to your machine core memory for loading into the registers in your CPU and its memory buffer called a cache for CPU use. That is why every real data storage system strives to use SCSI 15000 rpm drives and always uses stripped arrays for the fastest data retrieval possible originally a SCSI drive capability, that has been somewhat carried forward into the stuff they generally sell now known as SATA. So when the experts on here and elsewhere tell you defragmenters are worthless or unnecessary tools, their advice is utterly false for those of us with active machines that write a lot of data, and worse yet, an outright disservice for those of us that do a lot of disk activity over time. For those of you that check email and perhaps do some searching on the net, it is not so pertinent, but ask a video editor or database updating process designer or almost anything else that does a lot of writing to their system storage and if they are not defraggmenting regularly, they have a slower machine. Of course, the best way to defrag is to format and reinstall all as most files will be written contiguously to the disc and then the drive can actually read the biggest block of the many consecutively written sectors allowed by the disc, O/S and underlying controller, which can range from 2kb up to 256 MB per rotation. Lucky for us, 99% of all files on your machine typically are basically there for ONLY a read to load into memory and will never change their original location on your disc drive unless moved by you or during a defragmentation operation. That is how disc drives work. Optical media only writes contiguous data so this discussion has no bearing for CD-ROM or DVD storage media, nor to any streaming media such as tape data storage media other than the loss of magnetism during every pass of the heads. SSD drives are really only memory chips aligned in a different way than normally used by your machine. The problem with them, as with all Disc Drives is that they also have a finite number of write operations before they begin to fail as do disc drives, however disc drive media can be usually be completely restored to new if not physically destroyed by re-low leveling the media which re-magnetizes the platter coatings to as new, restoring the magnetic capacity of the media itself. SSD memory can not currently be rejuvenated as disc drives can be. Just as in your 8 track or cassette or reel to reel tapes, every pass of the disc drive head over the magnetically polarized tracks on your media actually removes a tiny but measurable amount of magnetism from the media's surface and at some point, error correction then fails to recover the complete file and you get an inpage data error. Drives have gotten loads better over the years but they still fail from these causes and need to be reformatted to fix these inpage errors. Just a couple of hints for those wanting to know how the hardware works.
    Last edited by mpioso; 2012-07-05 at 03:34.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpioso View Post
    Even when you have deleted files from your machine, and then deleted them from the Recycle Bin, these files REMAIN on your Hard Disc Drive and are NOT gone, and they are completely recoverable if you follow certain procedures. When you delete a file, it is then mapped into the Recycle Bin's reserved space, commonly known as a folder or directory if you under 30, that is generally not readable by most if not all common file managers as they then have become protected system files and folders. There are some file managers which will read into these recycle bin directories but are few and far between. If you have one, you can both see the file and simply move it or copy elsewhere if you so chose. For those of you that do not have these tools, take heart, there are other means to recover these supposedly lost and gone forever files, IF you do not over write the released space on the partition until they have been recovered.

    Only the first four characters (bytes) of the file header are actually nulled so the allocation tables no longer can find the files and their pointers were released once they were removed from the Recycle Bin. Your data is STILL there, and intact, if you do not write to the disc partition where the files were located and thereby overwriting either the four missing bytes or some of or the rest of the data. There are many tools available to actually look for, find and recover these "lost" files usually without problem. They are typically known as Undeleters which were relatively common in the day of DOS, PICK, UNIX, XENIX, etc. With the advent of GUI's, technically savvy people faded into relative obscurity which is why hardly anyone knows about these tools anymore. M$'s DOS command Undelete.exe is a common example and most tool developers had their own versions to compete in the software tool universe such as PC TOOLS, and many other developers.

    Unfortunately, none of the older tools could cope with new Window"s longer file names larger than the common 8.3 lengths so they basically faded from view along with the low level (read as technically skilled) users since the goal was to turn computers and its hardware into toasters for the common man and sell them to the masses. Look around for Undeleters and you will find them. Use them to recover your deleted files and they will work. Just DO NOT write any data to the partition until you have used these tools. Hard Disc Drives typically write data to the closest physical track to Track 0 if it, or a portion of it, will fit in the first sector found empty, but if it is too big to write the entire file there it will continue to write the next block of data, usually 512 bytes to the next closest empty sector, and then the next closest empty, etc. until the complete file has been saved. This is why anyone who actually has a fairly active system can generate thousands, even millions of these "fragmented files" on their drives over a period of time.

    This will indeed slow your machine down, sometimes considerably because a standard, non-striped array hard disc drive can only read one sector of data at a time, again usually only 512 Bytes, per revolution since the head can not move to another sector fast enough (SCSI and some SATA drives have "elevator" seeking built in which can do more than one sector read or write, but not both, per revolution since it can talk to different platters at the same instant in time) which is usually loaded into the disc's buffer and then sent as a larger segment to memory and if the file has ten segments, the drive must spin ten times around to get the entire file read into buffer memory until either the entire file is loaded into the buffer or the buffer is full and is then sent to your machine core memory for loading into the registers in your CPU and its memory buffer called a cache for CPU use.

    That is why every real data storage system strives to use SCSI 15000 rpm drives and always uses stripped arrays for the fastest data retrieval possible originally a SCSI drive capability, that has been somewhat carried forward into the stuff they generally sell now known as SATA. So when the experts on here and elsewhere tell you defragmenters are worthless or unnecessary tools, their advice is utterly false for those of us with active machines that write a lot of data, and worse yet, an outright disservice for those of us that do a lot of disk activity over time.

    For those of you that check email and perhaps do some searching on the net, it is not so pertinent, but ask a video editor or database updating process designer or almost anything else that does a lot of writing to their system storage and if they are not defraggmenting regularly, they have a slower machine. Of course, the best way to defrag is to format and reinstall all as most files will be written contiguously to the disc and then the drive can actually read the biggest block of the many consecutively written sectors allowed by the disc, O/S and underlying controller, which can range from 2kb up to 256 MB per rotation. Lucky for us, 99% of all files on your machine typically are basically there for ONLY a read to load into memory and will never change their original location on your disc drive unless moved by you or during a defragmentation operation. That is how disc drives work. Optical media only writes contiguous data so this discussion has no bearing for CD-ROM or DVD storage media, nor to any streaming media such as tape data storage media other than the loss of magnetism during every pass of the heads. SSD drives are really only memory chips aligned in a different way than normally used by your machine.

    The problem with them, as with all Disc Drives is that they also have a finite number of write operations before they begin to fail as do disc drives, however disc drive media can be usually be completely restored to new if not physically destroyed by re-low leveling the media which re-magnetizes the platter coatings to as new, restoring the magnetic capacity of the media itself. SSD memory can not currently be rejuvenated as disc drives can be. Just as in your 8 track or cassette or reel to reel tapes, every pass of the disc drive head over the magnetically polarized tracks on your media actually removes a tiny but measurable amount of magnetism from the media's surface and at some point, error correction then fails to recover the complete file and you get an inpage data error.

    Drives have gotten loads better over the years but they still fail from these causes and need to be reformatted to fix these inpage errors. Just a couple of hints for those wanting to know how the hardware works.
    Great response, however for readability perhaps you could incorporate a few paragraph breaks. Just a little helpful info!:-) ( see above)

  7. #7
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Ditto!

    That long dissertation with absolutely NO breaks makes my eyes hurt.

    But just a point of order:
    The recycle bin is a digital "Waste Basket". Never put anything you want to keep in a "Waste Basket" (why would you?) because as sure as you do, someone will come along and empty it for you.

    Almost every cleanup program I've ever tried, including MS's own Disk Cleanup, will empty the Recycle Bin.
    I even incorporated that into my own "Cleanup.bat" batch file that runs on my PC every time I boot it up.

    But if you're deleting things that you absolutely NEVER EVER, EVER want to see again, just hold down the left Shift key when you either press the Del key or click on a Delete button. The offending object will just be GONE and never show up in the Recycle bin. And you won't see that annoying message about Are you sure.....etc.

    Interesting topic!

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  8. #8
    2 Star Lounger Katz's Avatar
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    But if you're not sure you want to delete them, make a special folder for files that are in that twilight zone. I call mine "AAAA" on my Data partition (you can put it anywhere you want,) and it's just for such temporary storage.
    2 desktops: Win XP Pro SP3 / 3 GHZ/3 GB RAM/ Firefox, Thunderbird /
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  9. #9
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    Yes, I do apologize about the lack of readability but I tried putting paragraph breaks in four times but none of them eventually took once posted, using both double returns, html code paragraph breaks. etc. Mind telling me how to do this here in this forum, please? Never had this issue in other forums... Also, one other thing, although you may run Cleanup, and yes, it and many other routines will empty the Bin, the files remain on the disc until both the headers, pointers and the sectors containing the file data is overwritten so do not expect them to not be found by good Undelete programs or what is known as Forensic softwares. Also, the really good proggies can even read files even though the sectors HAVE been overwritten, so if you really need it back, if you have money to spend, it can be done unless the drive's media surface has been physically damaged.
    Last edited by mpioso; 2012-07-05 at 12:31.

  10. #10
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    Try This "dz"

    I am no techie at all dz, but you say you deleted the original files from an external hard drive. I notice that when I delete files on an external USB 2.0 thumbdrive using Windows XP Pro that they are put in a hidden directory on the USB thumbdrive called ".Trash-xxxx", where "xxxx" is a number (a usr number I think). Try reconnecting the external hard drive before using your file recovery software.

  11. #11
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Try running Recuva http://www.piriform.com/recuva . Its pretty good at recovering deleted files if you haven't done a lot of writes to the disk after the deletions.

    Jerry

  12. #12
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    Paragraphs & Spacing

    See this thread about paragraphs and spacing:

    http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...y-on-this-site.

  13. #13
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    If you want to recover files from bad Recycle Bin then try out one of the most fameous tool which is known as Remo Recover, it has ability get back files from Recycle Bin with ease.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laserbiz View Post
    Great response, however for readability perhaps you could incorporate a few paragraph breaks. Just a little helpful info!:-) ( see above)
    I didn't even try!

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