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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    I have the file, but Explorer can't find it!

    Hi,

    I use Quicken 2003 for bookkeeping, and I was setting up a backup with a new program (Cobian Backup 11) when I discovered that Windows 7 can't find my Quicken data file. It's the most perplexing thing! I can run Quicken, and the File menu tells me C:\Program Files (x86)\Quicken\Qdata1.qdf is what I have open. I can type Qdata1.qdf into the Windows Search bar in the Start Orb, and before I've finished typing it displays Qdata1.qdf like it should.

    Here's the strange part: If I right-click and choose "Open File Location" it can't find the file! And if I open an Explorer window and navigate to the directory, the file doesn't appear! Every other file that Quicken uses seems to show up, so why not my data file?! And yes, I have folder viewing options set to show extensions of known file types (and hidden files, etc.).

    Is there something new to Win 7 I'm overlooking?

    Thanks!

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  3. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Laughing1, welcome to the Lounge.

    The file location may not have been included in the original index of your PC. This article seems to have a good explanation of how to index your PC to include all locations. Be advised the first time you run the index it does take a while. It seems the Windows default index is not as comprehensive as it should be.

    A Google search of Win 7 Search Index shows many such articles.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  4. #3
    New Lounger
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    Thanks Ted.

    I read the article, and I started to update the indexing before leaving for work (on a break now). BTW: the .qdf file type was listed as an indexed type.

    Do you believe that updating or even rebuilding the indexing will solve the problem of Explorer not showing the file? Because the indexing article leads me to think that it will only fix Windows Search.

  5. #4
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Explorer uses Windows search. I was able to find several areas on my PC that had not been included in the original index.

    Quicken 2003, if I'm not mistaken, uses several files for their data file. I know Quicken 2008 had I believe 4 separate files that had to be accessed to open the data file. With version 2011 and now 2012, that has been changed to just a single file.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  6. #5
    4 Star Lounger
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    Try using an search operator. For example, type: name type:quicken (where "name" represents the name of your file).

    If you can't remember the name of the file, just type: type:quicken which will give you all the files types which are Quicken.

    You can also do it this way: name ext:qdf (change the extension to the one you're looking for).

    Quicken also has its own search tool which records the last four files you opened: http://quicken.intuit.com/support/he.../GEN82048.html

  7. #6
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    Explorer uses Windows search. I was able to find several areas on my PC that had not been included in the original index.

    Quicken 2003, if I'm not mistaken, uses several files for their data file. I know Quicken 2008 had I believe 4 separate files that had to be accessed to open the data file. With version 2011 and now 2012, that has been changed to just a single file.
    True. The other 3 (to 5) files contain user preferences, email messages, and other non-essential data. The .qdf file contains your actual financial records. You can delete the other 3 (to 5) and run the program, and it will auto-generate at least 3 of the others (losing your prefs, etc.) while keeping your precious data. The last 2 won't auto-generate until you take a specific action such as send or receive an email within Quicken.

    So I tend to focus on the .qdf but since you mention it, the other user files aren't showing up either!

    I rebuilt the index, expanding the locations to be indexed. It didn't help.

    I notice that some of the Excluded locations are Data and AppData locations. Attempting to dig to those locations was a bit of a frustrating exercise, running into lots of permissions issues. In fact, between the Windows 7 permissions, and now this mysterious limited search business, I'm really losing enthusiasm for Windows 7. So much for making new OS's more user friendly. The article you referred me to laments XP's search function but I never had a complaint with it, and I used it a great deal. Windows 7 not being able to find a data file that both Quicken and I know is there is just stupid.

    It's all striking me as a collosal waste of human capital: I would like to use my talent for other things than becoming a good Windows OS geek, yet all of this was initiated by my attempt to back up my precious data - which Microsoft has also failed to give any priority to. Why didn't they force all developers to place user data in one location years ago? Because bells and whistles were more important than user's data.

    Ok, I been raving. I do that when I'm wasting huge amounts of time on something that should "just work" as Steve Jobs used to say (he lied too).

    Xircal: thank you for pointing out search operators, but as you can read in this post and my first, the problem isn't remembering the filename, etc. It's Windows 7 not "seeing" a file that I already know the name and location of.

  8. #7
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    When you changed the search settings did you check to make sure that .qdf was included in the file types to be indexed?

    Joe

  9. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    That is very strange, because I use Quicken (at least 3 versions) very successfully in both Win 7 and Win 8 RP beta. When I opened Quicken it would ask me what file to open, I pointed to the file in explorer and it opened. I have no other ideas what could be going on.

    Did you, instead of putting the whole file name in the search, just put .qdf in the search box. My shows up just fine

    QuickenDataFile.jpg
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  10. #9
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    Disregard my earlier post. You are not having a search issue. Have you cleared the checkbox for "Hide protected operating system file"? When you search for the .qdf file, in the search results right click the file and select Properties. What are its properties in the General tab? What about the Security tab?

    Joe

  11. #10
    New Lounger
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    I now agree that I'm not having a search issue. I came to this conclusion after reading more about indexing, and that it merely speeds up the search process, but you can search with it paused or turned off.

    JoeP517:Yes, I started with Windows 3.0. One of the first things I do after installing a new Windows OS is change the folder view options so Windows won't treat me like a 6 year old.

    Searching produces only one result, which is a shortcut that fails to function. Yet the Properties gives the correct target: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Quicken\Qdata1.QDF"
    The Target tab is the focus by default. Attempting to click any other tab such as General produces an error message because Windows sees the shortcut as faulty. The error popup title is "Problem with Shortcut" and of course it asks you to double check the path.

    When I very first couldn't find the file (and Ted: it's really all of the user files that are gone), I thought perhaps I had moved it to a location that would be more conducive to backing up. But that's when I discovered that searching can't find it either. And I have gone into the Advanced properties of the indexer, and it does have all of the Quicken user files listed and checked (qdf, qdb, qdx, qdt).

    I also just performed an experiment: I used Cobian Backup 11 to do a backup of the C:\Program Files (x86)\Quicken directory. I backed it up to a Linux based NAS. Then I used a Linux based file explorer in my Android phone to see what files had backed up, and the qd* type files were NOT there. So the only thing I can deduce from the results is that Cobian uses the same engine as Windows to recognize files, so it didn't "see" anything Windows couldn't "see". Which makes complete sense - why wouldn't it? Even the dialog boxes look just like Windows Explorer.

    Maddening!!

  12. #11
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I'm sorry, I have no other ideas at this time. As I said my Quicken files all show up as expected in both Win 7 and Win 8 RP. Even my automatic backup files (Quicken makes an automatic backup every some many iterations) show up in explorer.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  13. #12
    New Lounger
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    On other forums, LOTS of people have had similar complaints - Google something like: "Windows 7 can't find file". On one forum I stumbled onto a mention of running the program with elevated privileges once, so I tried that. I went to Start>Quicken 2003 and right-clicked, chose "Run as Administrator". Instead of the program opening as usual, I got a "Welcome to Quicken" dialog, where I had to answer that I already was a Quicken user (vs. new user). That brought up a File>Open dialog, that was already open to "C:\Program Files (x86)\Quicken" and I simply scrolled to "Qdata1.qdf". I then made a small change to a transaction, saved and exited.

    Now typing "qdata" into Start>Search gets several hits: a "Quicken.ini" file that has just been created in "C:\windows", a .txt file I recently typed that word into, an empty folder just created in "C:\Program Files (x86)\Quicken\inet", and "C:\Documents and Settings\Michael\Appdata\Local\VirtualStore\Progra m Files(x86)\Quicken\Qdata1.qdf" along with all the other user files (*.q**), a handful of other files, and about half the folders that were already in "C:\Program Files (x86)\Quicken".

    So let's see now: Windows 7 Home Premium 32 allowed me to run my x86 program, and allowed that program to decide where to place the user data files (in its own directory, as typical). But without a word to the user it ran the program with some mysterious kind of limited privileges that hid the user data files from virtually everything in the OS, and 3rd party apps as well. Then the beleaguered user has to search around forums for hours on end, requesting assistance AND TIME from generous people like yourselves, who have can in no way be considered "novice" users, yet who also don't know the answer - because it's so damn obtuse.

    And after all this, I don't know if Windows has moved my files without permission, or if the copies are "virtual" as in "VirtualStore", and my original files are in reality still in the original location but simply hidden from everything except Microsoft's deep hard code.

    A small amount of time on the part of Microsoft could have saved untold human capital, and they continue to squander it today. But who cares? They saved a little money - and damn the rest of us.

    Thank you for your time gentlemen.

  14. #13
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    It sounds like you hit upon the solution. Glad that worked. Win 7 does work toward a more secure PC than previous versions. Even working from an Administrator Account, you do not get the highest level of Administrator Rights. This only comes with Run As Administrator. What I do now is always Right Click an installation .exe and Choose this highest level during installation. I'm now wondering if installing the app in this way would have solved the problem before it started.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  15. #14
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    With Windows 7 both "C:\Program Files" & "C:\Program Files (x86)" are highly protected. A program and/or user must have special privileges to write in them. Therefore, the Virtual Store concept was invented. It allows older programs which are not aware of the Windows 7 security paradigm to continue to function. The files are really in that location.

    Joe

  16. #15
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    ... Win 7 does work toward a more secure PC than previous versions... What I do now is always Right Click an installation .exe and Choose this highest level during installation. I'm now wondering if installing the app in this way would have solved the problem before it started.
    Good point. And you can bet I'll do that in the future. But your suggestion indicates to me that by creating such a labyrinth, MS has defeated the purpose, forcing users to learn the simplest workaround to the inscrutable GUI they gave us.

    Thanks for the tip.

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