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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Need help with expanding network

    Currently have a Linksys/Cisco WRT54G2 ver1 router (wireless and wired model) connected to cable modem and is hardwired into various computers in the house. Wireless part disabled. Purchased Linksys/Cisco WRT610N dual band (wireless and wired model) and want to connect WIRELESSLY to one or two other computers in garage. I tried running an ethernet cord from an outbound port on the WRT54G2 to the Internet port (Inbound) on the WRT610.....the WRT54G2 showed a blinking icon light that indicated "something" was attached and receiving signal from it........the WRT610 showed it was receiving and appeared to be responding but when I went into the laptop I got nothing.....it didn't even show up in the wireless network connections even though the neighbors networks were all showing.....how do I setup the second router so it can work wirelessly and the first router can work wired only....thanks for any help, diagrams, etc...

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  3. #2
    New Lounger
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    Too difficult for lounge members to answer too or did I not explain it clearly enough......................

  4. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    You do at times have to be patient. The right members have to read this thread before an answer can be formulated. We are not all network experts. For example if my OS did not set up my network automatically, I would have been asking questions here as well. I have never tried to connect a second router in line with the first router. This is a specialized setup and only certain people will have the knowledge necessary to answer this. Please be patient!
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  5. #4
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    Is there a need to have the two routers? It will make things a bit more complex.
    You will probably need to configure the 2nd router before you can try to start using it. A first concern would be to check what IP is it configured to run on and make sure it's not colliding with the original router. Being from the same manufacturer, it might be on the same IP.

    I am not sure, but it is that likely you will have to configure the 2nd wireless router to work as an access point only, so that DHCP requests passed to the first router only. It may require a bit of testing to get things going, even more so if you want to have all computers "talking" to each other.

  6. #5
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    As Ruirib says, you need to operate the WRT610N in a wireless access point mode rather than as a router.

    Possibly, the WAN (input connection) on the WRT610N can be used to connect to the WRT54G2, but you may need to use one of the LAN ports instead. Turn off DHCP on the WRT610N - there cannot be two DHCP servers on a single network. Set a fixed IP address on it which is outside the range of the DHCP server in the WRT54G2. This must be checked and set manually otherwise at some point in time the DHCP server in the WRT54G2 will attempt to allocate an address conflicts with the WRT54G2.

    If for example the WRT54G2 has an internal IP address of 192.168.1.1 and a DHCP range of 192.168.1.100 - 192.168.1.150 then you can safely set the WRT610N IP address to 192.168.0.10 (outside the range of the WRT54G2). If you configure the WRT610N as an access point, it must be on the same subnet as the first router. In almost all practical cases residential routers will have a 255.255.255.0 net mask, so if the WRT54G2 is on 192.168.1.1, ensure the WRT610N is on 192.168.1.y rather than 192.168.0.z.

    The WRT610N will need to be setup initially in isolation to the WRT54G2, by connecting a PC or laptop directly to it. That also means the IP address on the PC or laptop will probably need to be temporarily adjusted to a fixed IP in the TCP/IPv4 adapter properties so it can still connect to the WRT610N when DHCP has been disabled. Once you have the settings made correctly, you can re-adjust the PC or laptop back to use DHCP client mode (Obtain IP address automatically) from the WRT54G2.

    You will need to review the manual to see if the WAN port can be used as the incoming port for the access point, or if you need to connect onto the WRT610N LAN ports to bring in the connection from the WRT54G2.

    All this should be tested on the bench ideally with the two boxes sat next to each other so you don't have to move to a fro the garage to check or change settings.

    Also, make sure you change the default router admin passwords and set a strong WPA2 key on the wireless port.
    Last edited by Tinto Tech; 2012-06-29 at 07:24.
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  7. #6
    New Lounger
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    Okay.....before I go too crazy with trying to figure all this out that you suggested, maybe I should state exactly what I want to do, and then, is it possible to do with one router.......I want to run a wireless connection to the garage and keep my WIRED connections in the house at the same time BUT I don't want the wireless and wired to "see " each other......in other words, like running two separate networks but from one router.......part wired, part wireless....

  8. #7
    Platinum Lounger
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    Can't really be done with only 2 devices.
    See this thread. http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...=remote+office

    cheers, Paul

  9. #8
    New Lounger
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    Thanks for the link Paul.......I scanned through it quickly and followed some info on there and will see what I can do...from the info there and some other info I have gathered, it does seem possible to use the two routers as long as router #1 has DHCP server shutoff and from there I'll have to see if anything else besides the ip config needs changed......it'll be a couple of days before I can try all this out and get back to you and everyone else that has responded.....thanks for all the replies so far.....much appreciated

  10. #9
    New Lounger
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    I figured out how to use only ONE router, I used the WRT610N, and manually set the Allowed ip numbers to be seen in the wireless and have access while limiting each pc to only seeing itself on the network. I also filled all 4 LAN ports on same router with wired routes to individual computers and set them not to be seen by each other. I experimented around a lot and it was actually fun to figure it out and how easily it was to really set it up that way........the first other route I had considered was using a switch and then running both routers off there......if I run any more wired computer setups I'll have to change from the one, dual band, wired/wireless router setup though.......thanks for your help and I thought you might be interested in knowing I got it figured out and how.

  11. #10
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    That's good, you router supports Wireless Access Point Isolation. In this mode each wireless client is treated as if they were on their own individual network and can communicate with the router (and hence the internet) but not with any other client on the network.

    You should however take steps to secure the router by changing the admin account name and password. Linksys routers, along with most other residential grade routers, have standard default admin account credentials that can be discovered in no time at all (admin/admin, admin/password are good ones to start with!). Many even have the login details printed on the underside. Change the admin password to a strong one so that no wireless user can change the router Access Point Isolation settings.
    In God we trust; all others must bring data.

    - William Edwards Deming. 1900 - 1993

  12. #11
    New Lounger
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    I did use the highest security settings, made up my own admin account name/password......I have admin rights on all computers involved under my network so no-one else can access the router through the internet because they don't have the name/password anyway......as for the sniffers out there, if they want it bad enough, they may get it, they may not........that's a chance everyone takes...

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