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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Thumbs up How do you 'Defrag' ?

    Hi Loungers,

    In my search to find the best way of doing things to my computer, I found this on using a Defragmenter. http://ultradefrag.sourceforge.net/handbook/index.html The 'Tips and Tricks' section is the most interesting.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

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    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    "Defragment your system disk only when you notice a system slowdown".
    How often would you "notice a system slowdown", since almost by definition this is a gradual process?

    And as for suggesting that the USN Journal be deleted, Microsoft says,
    "Deleting the change journal impacts the File Replication Service (FRS) and the Indexing Service, because it would require these services to perform a complete (and time-consuming) scan of the volume. This in turn negatively impacts FRS SYSVOL replication and replication between DFS link alternates while the volume is being rescanned."
    So this might well produce a noticeable 'system slowdown'?
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I use Windows built in defrag and only do so just after I clean up my PC and get ready to create an Image. This way my Image is as optimized as possible without any junk (temp) files in the Image.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    "Defragment your system disk only when you notice a system slowdown".
    How often would you "notice a system slowdown", since almost by definition this is a gradual process?
    I realize this is rather confusing, I tended to derfag & optimise only after a large footprint new app was installed, then just analyse occassionally. Currently using Auslogics.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  6. #5
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    I use Windows built in defrag and only do so just after I clean up my PC and get ready to create an Image. This way my Image is as optimized as possible without any junk (temp) files in the Image.
    Yes, but do you do it as described in the 'Tips and Tricks' section of my link.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I did not read the entire article, but it is my feeling that with Win 7 defrag is not necessarily needed. With this OS and Win 8 RP, I feel defragging just prior to creating an Image is fine. I wish to have my Images as optimized as possible. Since I create a new Image at least once per month, my OS is defragged at least once per month.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    I did not read the entire article, but it is my feeling that with Win 7 defrag is not necessarily needed. With this OS and Win 8 RP, I feel defragging just prior to creating an Image is fine. I wish to have my Images as optimized as possible. Since I create a new Image at least once per month, my OS is defragged at least once per month.
    Sounds feasible, but over use of defrag is not recommended.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I will only have need to defrag partitions, as my primary drive is an SSD. Defragmenting in this instance seldom need be done, and only when large amounts of files are removed.

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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    I will only have need to defrag partitions, as my primary drive is an SSD. Defragmenting in this instance seldom need be done, and only when large amounts of files are removed.
    I have only read about SSD & have no first hand experience of them.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

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    Don't defrag an SSD, you use write cycles and that reduces drive life.
    There is virtually no performance penalty with fragmented files on an SSD as there are no mechanical bits to move to read / write the data.

    Personally I see no advantage in a defrag unless you've had a major clean up and removed half the files on your disk. Defrag before imaging is pointless as the image program copies files and system details, not file fragment locations and a restore to a blank disk will result in a defragmented disk.

    cheers, Paul

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    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    I rarely defrag and when I do check it's usually under 6% fragmentation.

    Ted, after you make an image check the fragmentation on the drive where your image is saved and you will see it's over 75% fragmented....
    Why I don't know..
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Banyarola View Post
    I rarely defrag and when I do check it's usually under 6% fragmentation.
    I use Auslogics Defrag, it used to show whether defragging was needed, now it shows this:-

    Untitled.jpg
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  14. #13
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Personally, I think defragging too often really stresses a drive and I do it very rarely.
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  15. #14
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Years ago, MS had no defrag program. (Pre Windows)
    "Central Point Software" came out with a program called "Compress" which defragged a hard drive and did move the files together performing a "Compress" of the data on the hard drive. When MS finally did provide a Defrag program with windows, it was almost a clone of the "Compress" program that I was already familiar with.
    If you've ever watched the Defrag on Windows 98 or ME, you know what I'm talking about.

    Norton put out a defrag program too, called "Speed Disk" (circa, 1990) which worked pretty well on most hard drives, but crashed Seagate drives all over the world. So I never used that one.

    Now this will blow a few minds, but MS added Defrag to it's Windows OS for a good reason, not just for the fun of it.
    It's meant to be run as a part of a regular HD maintenance routine, just like "Disk Cleanup".
    It can keep an HD well ordered and running at max efficiency.*

    Sure Defrag adds some wear to a HD, but so does fragmented files that have to be loaded every day.
    When you delete a bunch of files and then install new files to your HD, you've just created Fragmentation,
    because the DOS (disk operating system) will fill available holes with the new files.

    * I go one step further, (like Ted said) I do a whole C: partition backup at least once a week, and before I do I remove (delete)
    every file from my HD that does not NEED to be there. Why waste valuable space in my Backup Image File?
    All the normal junk gets deleted as well as the Pagefile and old Restore Points. Doing this cleanup takes over 6 gig's of junk
    out of my Backup files.

    ** Then I go one step further, similar to what we did on the big Mainframe computers of yesteryear. After I've created my
    backup and verified the integrity of the backup file, I do an Immediate Restore of my new Backup file.
    This re-writes (refreshes) my hard drive, with NO spaces between files and NO Fragmentation.

    The entire process of Backup + Verify + Restore takes me less than a half hour, using Ghost 11.5 on a Bootable DOS disk.

    My computer runs like a scalded dog and I've not lost one data file in over ten years.

    Cheers Mates!

    The Doctor

    Just for fun..... here's my XP drive after a Backup + restore.



    And, YES, I do keep my XP drive in FAT-32 format, so I have total access to every file on that drive, even from a DOS boot disk.
    Contrary to some Self Proclaimed Experts, XP runs great on a FAT-32 drive. Microsoft made that possible!
    Last edited by DrWho; 2012-07-05 at 11:03.
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

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  17. #15
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    <I do a whole C: partition backup at least once a week>

    Some people have way too much spare time. ;-))

    cheers, Paul

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