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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Why would anyone want to chance destroying their CPU to gain a few more cycles out of it. Perhaps I'm old fashioned, but it does not make sense to me.
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    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    It all depends on the knowledge of the over clocker and the hardware involved. Sufficient cooling can be a large factor. I have been running my first generation core i7 desktop overclocked by 25% for several years now without problems. Its not advised for the average user although it doesn't hurt to try it. Unless you overclock by an extreme amount, you won't damage the hardware. You will just see crashes and then you can remove the over clock.

    Jerry

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    5 Star Lounger RussB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    Why would anyone want to chance destroying their CPU to gain a few more cycles out of it. Perhaps I'm old fashioned, but it does not make sense to me.
    I think that it is similar to the desire to explore new worlds, see new things, go where no man has gone before.
    Do you "Believe"? Do you vote? Please Read:
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    DETAIL in your question promotes DETAIL in my answer.
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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Oh well, like I said old fashioned (you can read "old" into that if you wish). With modern technology and enough resources installed I just don't feel the need to experiment with my hardware to this extent. I just cannot afford to replace this stuff when something bad happens.

    It would be just my luck that the you know what would hit the proverbial fan. You know, If I did not have bad luck, I would have no luck at all.
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    As a number of the comments to that article note, it is bad science to blame the OS when an overclocked machine crashes.

    If I were to overclock a machine running some other OS, would it crash more or less that Windows 8 on the same hardware? I would say that if Windows 8 crashed more on the same platform than another OS, then Windows 8 would be at fault, not the platform, nor the level of overclocking.

    Another point raised in the comments was that it had been observed that once a crash occurred, more would follow. Isn't that fairly obvious? If the user has overclocked their machine to the point of instability then it will be prone to crashing. Many overclockers have a passion about their pursuits and will push their machines to and beyond the limits. Crashing is a natural hazard that every overclocker encounters. Some overclockers might argue that if you haven't crashed the machine, you haven't pushed it hard enough - a similar mentality to racing cars etc. Moreover, successful experimentation with overclocking leads to a genuine and deep understanding of the system hardware: and that's not a bad thing.

    Outside of the hobbyist realm, overclocking is a perfectly valid thing to do if you require more horsepower than your stock hardware allows. As long as you can get rid of the excess heat and stay within stable limits then you can see some real improvements. Hardware failure due to electromigration is unlikely to occur if the system stays within it's stability envelope.

    Do I overclock now? No, because I do not want to run the risk of complaints where somebody tries to blame the overclocking rather than the manner in which the machine is used when they run into trouble. Keeping it at stock kills that route stone dead.

    Have I overclocked in the past? Of course, for my own purposes, no problem.

    P.S. for Ted: I think you run laptops? That being the case, I would not recommend OC'ing - removing the excess heat would be near impossible. Laptops in general are run much closer to the design limits in the first place. Many people will have experienced the pain of a hot laptop on the knees and some will have seen them crash as a result of heat buildup.
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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Yes, you are correct Tinto. My wife and I both have laptops. I also have a Dell XPS Desktop which does not get much use anymore. (It's located in a part of the house that makes it less than appealing and our laptops are so convenient. ) I am now using the desktop as a storage media (Basic Win 7 HP. 160 Gb HD, 32 Bit, 4 Gb Ram) It's not a bad unit, but sitting upstairs in the study. I do not wish to do my PC work there, hence we use our laptops.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I doubt it's possible to destroy a modern CPU these days with overclocking, it just throttles back or will shut down on you if temps are high enough.
    The article is kind of a joke, you'll get BSOD's irregardless of whatever OS trying to OC.
    You got to have the hardware for a successfully sustained OC, even then you may see instability.

    OEM's and cheep computer usually suck badly when it comes to making real clock adjustments. You'll usually need to fork out some bucks for decent hardware, or settle for older hardware that's specifically intentioned for enthusiast overclocking.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2012-07-03 at 16:46.

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    The original research report doesn't mention Windows 8 once and is based on data collected in 2008 (before Windows 7!)

    The Windows 8 headline and introduction is just The Register's way to make old news seem relevant. Vista; not so much!

    Bruce

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