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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    The good and the bad of solid-state drives




    BEST HARDWARE
    The good and the bad of solid-state drives

    By Susan Bradley

    If you want to speed up a slow computer or build a peppy new machine, install one of the new SSDs.

    But don't overlook the hazards this amazing technology poses for your data: SSDs fail differently and possibly faster than traditional drives, so you must use them with care and back them up meticulously.

    The full text of this column is posted at WindowsSecrets.com/best-hardware/the-good-and-the-bad-of-solid-state-drives/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Tracey Capen; 2012-07-04 at 12:41.

  2. #2
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    As for the longevity and degradation of SSD's, their quality seems to have improved immensely in the past year, if Plextor's 5-year warranty is any indication. Also, while in principle SSD's shouldn't need defragging with Win 7, when several months into my Corsair Force 3's life I thought it had become slow, I decided to use MyDefrag on it. The difference afterwards was night and day. Not sure how to explain that. There are some defrag apps that do claim to be able to handle SSD's sensitively (Auslogic, Perfect Disk), but I'm not sure what to make of those claims.

  3. #3
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Regarding SSD Data Retention:

    SSDs cannot be read even by advanced forensics without a working controller. If you are concerned about residual data on a SSD, just remove the controller part of the device. This applies only to disposing of the devices, of course.

    One more way SSDs may prove enticing is that in pooled storage arrays (like the type proposed for Windows 8) their performance does seem to be better than drives with moving parts. And SSDs never need to be defragmented. SSD Reliabiltiy and durability are still open questions, last I read.

    But in pooled storage arrays, each file is mirrored onto different drives. Even flies which exist physically on several drives are mirrored in such a way as to have a reserve copy on different drives from any parts of the original files. Thus, if one drive fails and has to be swapped out, its entire contents can be reassembled from the reserve copies, and no data will be lost. That's pretty close to iron-clead file backup, without any user intervention.

    Windows Home Server operates in a similar way.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2012-07-06 at 10:33.
    -- Bob Primak --

  4. #4
    4 Star Lounger Jagworld's Avatar
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    SSD's have sure helped my son -- in spending so much time on PC.

    His photo editing was taking him 30-35 hrs a week, now it's down to 10.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    This should drive home the importance of a solid backup regimen for the average user.

  6. #6
    4 Star Lounger Jagworld's Avatar
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    I agree with you Clint........ backup-backup-backup.

    I alwas put it on 2 different USB external drives.

    I'm waiting a few more months before I pull the trigger on SSD's.

  7. #7
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    Sorry I'm rather late to this thread. Does anyone know of a simple way to move the Chrome Browser cache off my SSD 'C' Drive and onto a seperate hard disk I have installed. I've found it very easy to move IE cache, Firefox cache and loads of Temp files/folders off the SSD drive, but I've hunted everywhere and cannot seem to find an easy way to change Chorme's settings. Any help greatly appreciated.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Try this, or this

    A word of warning about doing that here.

    These were not hard finds.


    Just remember to back things up in case they go sideways, which usually can and does happen.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  9. #9
    New Lounger
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    Thanks CLiNT for your very swift answer.

    I have in fact found those articles before but I hardly think they fit my qualifiers of "simple way" and "easy way to change Chrome settings". I was looking for either the easy way of FireFox or the *very* simple way of IE.

    However, after reading the warning link you posted I think I'll just leave everything as it is.

    (BTW, a strange thing happens when I click on your "not hard finds" link - it takes me to my own Google home page complete with all news settings, RSS feeds etc. How did that happen?)

  10. #10
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by WmJay View Post
    (BTW, a strange thing happens when I click on your "not hard finds" link - it takes me to my own Google home page complete with all news settings, RSS feeds etc. How did that happen?)
    Answering my own query Your link opening my own iGoogle home page only happened in the Chrome browser. The search you had entered opened fine in FireFox and IE.

    The only reason I started using Chrome on my desktop is I now have an Android tablet using the Chrome browser and I also occasionally use a Chromebook laptop. It was handy to have everything synched on all three machines but I can live without it on my desktop. Thanks again for your help.
    Last edited by WmJay; 2012-09-13 at 14:45. Reason: error

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