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  1. #1
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    Stop software from saving me from myself

    How can I get Windows to stop treating me like an idiot and just let me do what I want?
    OK, that's vague.
    Specifically, sometimes when opening a file, I get a message asking me if I really want to open that file, along with a checkbox that - if left checked - will ask me every time I open that file.
    I want to be clear: this is not the one that asks if I want to open this type of file. It's asking me if I want to open this particular file. It almost exclusively happens with images downloaded from the internet. But it is not at all consistent. I download images all the time, but only sometimes run into this message.
    It doesn't happen only on certain file types either. Here is a screenshot for an image I downloaded today. It's a jpg - the most common image I download!
    Image1.png

    Is there somewhere / somehow I can turn off this unnecessary "protection"?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    You might try to change your UAC settings. I am not sure if this will allow this type of change, but worth trying.

    Control Panel, User Accounts, Change User Account Control Settings.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
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    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  3. #3
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    I believe it's down to how you have installed your programs. This is how I do it. Installing.pdf
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Nice little PDF presentation Roderunner

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    You can use Local Group Policy Editor to disable warnings for all future downloads, by enabling "Do not preserve zone information in file attachments", or at the same place adding certain file type extensions such as .jpg to your "Inclusion list for low risk file types" and enabling that option:

    Run > gpedit.msc > Local Group Policy Editor > Local Computer Policy> User Configuration> Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Attachment Manager

    Description of how the Attachment Manager works in Microsoft Windows

    The warning may currently seem haphazard because you download files from sites in different zones, e.g. some downloads are from trusted sites.

    Bruce
    Last edited by BruceR; 2012-07-10 at 15:13.

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    Quote Originally Posted by StickBoy View Post
    How can I get Windows to stop treating me like an idiot and just let me do what I want?

    Is there somewhere / somehow I can turn off this unnecessary "protection"?
    StickBoy,

    Hello... There is a free program that i have used for years called WinBubble I use the old program1.76 works on Vista and "7" 32 and 64.You can use the new if you want... Regards Fred
    Attached Images Attached Images
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

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  9. #7
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    I don't want to stop you from removing the layers of protection, but for the benefit of casual readers it may be worthwhile noting why these layers are in place.

    Windows, like all other modern operating systems requires users to have elevated privileges to access certain areas or to perform certain functions. Opening the system up to allow free and unfettered access can, potentially, lead to unforeseen and unwanted consequences. Downloaded images can be crafted to contain malicious code which, depending on the application used to open them can be exploited to open an injection route for malware.

    For several years now, Microsoft have struggled with the success of early XP systems which by default allowed the user much more open access and as a consequence were much easier to infect with malware. As users, we came to expect the degree of access delivered and railed against it when potentially dangerous mechanisms where protected. Now, Microsoft are caught between a rock and a hard place trying to secure the system, while not annoying users with spurious security prompts.

    Interesting to note that OSX, Linux and all other modern systems have similar protective requirements.
    In God we trust; all others must bring data.

    - William Edwards Deming. 1900 - 1993

  10. #8
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    Did an experiment. I downloaded the exact same image from the same website using Firefox, then using Chrome. The one from Firefox opened fine. The one from Chrome popped up the little message. So I guess this is a Chrome issue, then? Should I just re-install using the Administrator installation thingy? Or is there maybe some setting that got discombobulated on the last update?
    (Windows tells me I don't have gpedit.msc)

  11. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by StickBoy View Post
    (Windows tells me I don't have gpedit.msc)
    It doesn't exist in Windows 7 Home Premium.

    Bruce

  12. #10
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    I strongly recommend leaving this protection in place. While you are aware of downloading specific files and have assessed their potential for danger, there are other cases where you might be unaware that such a think is happening. You could innocently or inadvertently click on something that causes an exe file to be downloaded and run. And then you are had! But if you leave the protection, this scenario causes a popup, which leads to a "???" moment, which leads to you disallowing the app to run. Better that than being infected by a virus.

    Also, the protection is enabled by setting a flag on the file. It would appear that you have either a plugin or setting in Firefox that is turning the flag off automatically (things I downloading Firefox have the flag and ask me for permission). I suggest you not do any web browsing with Firefox (unless you can find the setting or plugin involved) and stick with Chrome.
    Last edited by Just Plain Fred; 2012-07-11 at 11:42.

  13. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafed00d View Post
    I strongly recommend leaving this protection in place. While you are aware of downloading specific files and have assessed their potential for danger, there are other cases where you might be unaware that such a think is happening. You could innocently or inadvertently click on something that causes an exe file to be downloaded and run. And then you are had! But if you leave the protection, this scenario causes a popup, which leads to a "???" moment, which leads to you disallowing the app to run. Better that than being infected by a virus.

    Also, the protection is enabled by setting a flag on the file. It would appear that you have either a plugin or setting in Firefox that is turning the flag off automatically (things I downloading Firefox have the flag and ask me for permission). I suggest you not do any web browsing with Firefox (unless you can find the setting or plugin involved) and stick with Chrome.
    Actually, it's things like this that push me to not use Chrome. I am not an idiot. If I click on something, it's because I want it to open. I understand the need for certain protections across all installations of Windows. But now it's mine and I want to customize it so it's usable and not stopping me every time I try to do something. It is the reason I have UAC completely turned off. And it is the reason I want to get rid of this stupid popup. Image files don't hurt! I am not randomly clicking on exe files. And even if I were, my anti-virus would protect me. Twice, in fact: it scans all downloads and it scans all programs when try to start them. I don't need a popup asking me if I want to open an image!
    Think of it this way: I just downloaded an image. Now I want to open it. If there is something malicious about it, how would I know? This popup does nothing! Yes, I want to open that file, because I just double-clicked it. The message doesn't scan the file, and it doesn't warn me it contains a virus. It's simply a popup that is telling me what I am doing. I already know what I am doing. I can't imagine there is anybody who will say no don't open it. So the message is pointless. And I want it gone.
    So instead of telling me to find the flag in Firefox and reset it, how about telling me how to find the flag in Chrome and unset it?
    Thanks!

  14. #12
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    Furthermore!
    I just downloaded an exe file with Chrome. As expected, I got the popup message when I tried to run it.
    Then I downloaded a zip file with Chrome and it opened without the popup message. Aren't zip files considerably more dangerous than jpg files? Yet Chrome warns about jpg files but not zip files....
    Inside that zip file was an exe file. When unzipped, the exe file ran without the popup message!
    Soooo ... yeah. Please tell me how to turn it off!

  15. #13
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    Check here:


    Settings>Advanced settings>Privacy>Content Settings>Images>Show all. Also make sure no exceptions are set in that section too.


    Now, consider that the messages are not asking you if you want to open the image, but suggesting that you might wish to ensure that it is safe before opening it.

    A downloaded "image" is not an image at all. It is a computer file that is created in a particular format which can be interpreted by software on your machine. That software can be attacked or exploited and can be forced or tricked into doing things it would not normally do.

    Hence, be sure not to click on obfuscated executable files. A file name can be crafted to look like a jpg, when in fact it could be and exe (for example filename.jpg.exe is an executable but most Windows installations will show it as filename.jpg).

    A zip file is not more dangerous than a .jpg. With a zip file, Windows will show you the content first. Zip files are often considered dangerous by less experienced users because they think the content are somehow hidden. Email programs will block exe files, but allow zip files - this is a source of many infection, but not a fault of the zip file - a fault of the user.

    Finally be aware that no antivirus tool is perfect. Safe internet use relies on multiple layers of security. One of the most important is the user being careful.
    Last edited by Tinto Tech; 2012-07-12 at 11:53.
    In God we trust; all others must bring data.

    - William Edwards Deming. 1900 - 1993

  16. #14
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    The irony lies in your very last sentence. Because the fact of the matter is that those computer users who don't know the previous bit are unable or unlikely to be careful. Those of us who do know the previous bit are already careful enough and don't need our hands held.

    One of the first things I do on a new Windows installation is turn on extensions for all files. The way Microsoft has the default is just plain dangerous. But at least they have a popup to tell me when I am opening an image file....

    Still not seeing the danger in an image file....

    My point about the zip file is that it can contain a malicious exe file, which is not warned about, where the image file is being warned about.
    I actually find Windows handling of zip files to be quite confusing. Am I opening the file or just unzipping it? I never know what's happening. So I use PeaZip.

    Appreciate the tip about the image settings, but when I went there it was already set as you suggested, with no exceptions.

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    @StickyBoy - I think your issue lies with the way the Windows Attachment Manager (WAM) feature is configured, see BruceR's post above - #5.

    If you open the file in the Windows Picture and Fax Viewer (WPFV) and you don't get the message then your issue is almost certainly the WAM configuration.

    Have a read of the Microsoft Link in BruceR's post to gain an "appreciation" of WAM's purpose and functionality

    The following Win7 Forum Tutorials have registry 'patches' you can apply, given you don't have the Group Policy Editor.

    http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials...lock-file.html
    http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials...e-disable.html

    BTW : You might want to consider upgrading your Win7 Home Premium to Professional to get the Group Policy Editor
    There are many useful things you can do with it even in a single user @ home environment.

    MS expect Home Premium users to "hack" the registry to configure their systems.
    MS provide GUI tools to Professionals and Corporate IT techies to configure their systems :go-figure:

    Good Luck NW2222
    Last edited by northwood2222; 2012-07-19 at 02:43.

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