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  1. #16
    New Lounger
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    Oh, I could use a simple copy or xcopy I know. In the past (and I'll admit it's the distant, distant past) I've often found that windows solutions don't scale well. They seem to timeout or just seem to get lost and become unresponsive. And if there is a problem part way through how do I restart? I could use the /Y option to suppress a confirm overwrite, but I'd really rather just skip copying files that were already copied. I suppose xcopy has enough command line switches to allow trying to take up where left off. If I weren't so cheap I'd just go buy a copy of Laplink.

  2. #17
    Lounger
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    RoboCopy, RichCopy, utlities such as manufacturer, Knoppix "dd" to ISO

    You have several options:

    For reliable Windows folder copying you can use the command line Microsoft utility Robocopy, or the GUI Microsoft utility RichCopy, both available on the Microsoft site (and elsewhere) if they are not on your computer already. These utilities recognize if files have already been copying, making restarting an aborted copy easier. RichCopy runs several directory and copy tasks for optimized copying. Create a separate directory on the USB drive for the root of your copy. I don’t know if these preserve access controls.

    Another option is to create a separate partition on your USB drive for the data copy, and use an imaging program or other utility, such as a manufacturer utility disk, to copy the whole partition either verbatim or as an image file.

    Option 3: boot up a Linux disk and use “dd” to copy your disk to an ISO image file. “dd” then can be used to restore the ISO image file to your new drive. You can also “mount” the ISO image using a variety of programs, such as “MagicDisk”

    Option 4: There are many other ways to copy the partition.

    Things might be a little easier if you provide a “label” for each partition on all disks that tells something about the partition. This can be helpful if using a Linux or other standalone program especially if you have changed the default drive letters like I did.

    I would also recommend partitioning that 2 TB drive into smaller partitions. I have a couple of “extra” partitions that can contain a complete backup of my “primary usage” partitions. I will run a backup to these partitions, and then can copy these partitions to external media at my leisure. It also makes for a quick restore to a recent backup if I foul things up. Other partitions include one for a Knoppix “boot” partition, selected by booting a Knoppix CD/DVD and entering a command like “knoppix fromhd=/dev/sdb8”.

  3. #18
    Star Lounger
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    Get an external hard drive

    It is nice to have a 2TB drive on the computer, but you do not want to depend on it for permanent storage of vitally important data. Obtain a large external hard drive(usually with a USB connection), copy the files you want to it, and then you can copy back to the new internal drive the files that you would like to have on it. You will thus kill two birds with one stone. You will have copied your files to the new drive and will have safely stored the most vital ones on an external drive. Also external drive is the place to store the disc images created by Acronis, Macrium or Windows 7.

  4. #19
    4 Star Lounger
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    I suggest you do the math on Windows 7: it will be pre-installed on any computer you buy now, and my impression is that your present machine is already mature. Windows 8 RTM will officially be out in a week.

    A new drive is an invitation to a clean install, but you could save the new drive for a new machine (or simply give it to them for a custom-built, possibly even with Win 8), and keep the old machine as it is for the short term at least, while you learn the new and copy data to the new. A new machine might be perfectly timed.

    It appears that you will have a hard drive left over. You can buy a superb enclosure for it (I got mine at Staples (Business Depot) for thirty bucks), and you would have all three drives connected before you start the show. Swap their locations when it suits your procedure.

    Acronis Bootable Rescue Media Builder will install comfortably on a flash drive (about 350 MB), and if you have the software, it will include both Disk Director 11 and TrueImage Home, for those with an interest in such things. It is remarkably convenient.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to dogberry For This Useful Post:

    EHarman (2013-01-26)

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