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  1. #1
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Black Hat: Researcher Points Ways to Attack Win 8, but overall more secure

    Black Hot Security Conference: A Researcher has pinpointed ways to attack Win 8, but states that overall it is much more secure than it's predecessor. Read about it here.

    This is another of those reasons we have been discussing that Win 8 looks very promising.
    Last edited by Medico; 2012-07-27 at 17:37.
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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Windows 8 is shaping up to be the most secure desktop and mobile OS

    Extreme Tech has the story.
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  3. #3
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    I think it pays to be cautious about labeling any OS as "most secure": it just attracts more interest in discovering vulnerabilities to exploit.

    Something I picked up on in both referenced articles is that there is a heavy slant towards the security of Metro, a UI that many are busy ignoring. Mobile devices running RT will undoubtedly be more secure, but is that a fair comparison to say Windows 7?

    Sure, Windows 8 has other security improvements, but the story is not always what it appears to be from the headlines: Another example of "grey reporting" by the news outlets could include UEFI and secure boot. How many systems have a TPM module and fully implement UEFI rather than BIOS?

    Then there are the comments in both articles about System Refresh. What does system refresh have to do with security if somebody has already stolen your data? It's like closing the stable door after the horse has bolted. Not that system refresh is a bad thing indeed it's a very good thing, but should not to be confused with security that's all!

    Granted, Windows 8 appears at first glance to be more secure than earlier Windows versions, but it is a fine balance to make. Opening up an OS to the range of user experience expected by the general public requires exposing more of an attack surface: there will be vulnerabilities and these will be exploited.
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