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  1. #1
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    Where we're all headed with Windows RT




    TOP STORY

    Where we're all headed with Windows RT


    By Woody Leonhard

    Last week, Microsoft released Windows 8 RTM to MSDN and TechNet subscribers and companies with volume licenses and Software Assurance. So a lot of people are getting a look at the final Windows 8 version. However, we've not seen much about its lighter compatriot — Windows RT.

    The full text of this column is posted at WindowsSecrets.com/top-story/where-were-all-headed-with-Windows-rt/ (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Tracey Capen; 2012-08-22 at 19:17.

  2. #2
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    Woody,
    After reading your column I am one step closer to chucking all of my MS gear and going with Apple. I've been using Windows since it was first on the market, having grown up on the old DOS operating system. I welcomed the multitasking capabilities of windows, the programs which ultimately came to interact with each other, like a spreadsheet in Word that updates when you update its source in Excel. I'm now 69 years old and pretty savvy when it comes to computers (having built my first one out of individual parts - the old 8088 microprocessor, etc. - paid $500 for a 30 MB hard drive and thought I had died and gone to heaven) and I am beginning to get frustrated when I see how seamlessly Apple devices operated compared to MS and other systems. I chucked my Blackberry for an Android because the Android, vial Google's interface, talks with my Outlook file.
    I predict that MS will eventually frustrate their loyal customers to the point that many of them abandon the once flagship company. My computing needs are not complicated - word processing, spreadsheets, etc., and the ability to move them across to my Thunderbolt, the ability to update Outlook files between my hand held and desktop. Interesting enough, my Android will sync my email and appointments seamlessly but not my contacts. I have to jump through a hoop to do that. Apple devices don't. The development people at MS seem almost myopic when it comes to giving their constituents what they want. In a word, MS should be designing its application software to integrate completely and flawlessly with its operating systems, and they with each other as well. Frankly, it will be a cold day in you know where before I switch to Windows 8. I like Windows 7 - it works fine for me. I am very likely to buy an Apple computer, an iPad and iPhone and have, for once, some continuity between devices.
    Thanks for all of your great articles and the good work you do to keep us informed of what the Beast is doing with our computing world.

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    Yes, let's all jump on Microsoft for selling hardware with their OS. Because it's worked out so poorly for Apple. And afterall Google would never think of doing that ei-- oh... wait... Google Nexus 7 (via ASUS) which is a phenominal success so far and they haven't even done a 10" tablet yet.

    Everyone needs to just get off their Microsoft-bashing elitist high horse and evaluate the truth of all this. Microsoft just finally came to terms with a truth--if you want a quality mobile platform with tight OS integration...you gotta make the hardware too, or at least control it.

  5. #4
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    I'll be interested in more info on Windows RT as well, specifically for 3G or 4G internet service on top of wifi.
    I would like to replace my iPad with a W8 RT tablet, but the last thing I want on a tablet is a full version of a desktop OS for obvious reasons.
    This is one area where all touch and Metro makes sense and 3rd party apps should be made to comply with that spec.
    The MS app store is still a big huge question mark that I hope they can manage to get right.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with MS getting in on the grownd level with their own introduction of a tablet on their own hardware design.
    This is a fitting and proper move for them provided that they don't make a bad spectacle of it, which is anybody's guess at this point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mbutler205 View Post
    Woody,
    After reading your column I am one step closer to chucking all of my MS gear and going with Apple. I've been using Windows since it was first on the market, having grown up on the old DOS operating system. I welcomed the multitasking capabilities of windows, the programs which ultimately came to interact with each other, like a spreadsheet in Word that updates when you update its source in Excel. I'm now 69 years old and pretty savvy when it comes to computers (having built my first one out of individual parts - the old 8088 microprocessor, etc. - paid $500 for a 30 MB hard drive and thought I had died and gone to heaven) and I am beginning to get frustrated when I see how seamlessly Apple devices operated compared to MS and other systems. I chucked my Blackberry for an Android because the Android, vial Google's interface, talks with my Outlook file.
    I predict that MS will eventually frustrate their loyal customers to the point that many of them abandon the once flagship company. My computing needs are not complicated - word processing, spreadsheets, etc., and the ability to move them across to my Thunderbolt, the ability to update Outlook files between my hand held and desktop. Interesting enough, my Android will sync my email and appointments seamlessly but not my contacts. I have to jump through a hoop to do that. Apple devices don't. The development people at MS seem almost myopic when it comes to giving their constituents what they want. In a word, MS should be designing its application software to integrate completely and flawlessly with its operating systems, and they with each other as well. Frankly, it will be a cold day in you know where before I switch to Windows 8. I like Windows 7 - it works fine for me. I am very likely to buy an Apple computer, an iPad and iPhone and have, for once, some continuity between devices.
    Thanks for all of your great articles and the good work you do to keep us informed of what the Beast is doing with our computing world.
    Thank you mbutler205. I quoted your entire post because it deserves to be read twice.

    As for the title of Woody's article: "Where we’re all headed with Windows RT", please don't include me in the "we" - I'm headed in another direction, thanks.

  7. #6
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    My comment is more on the "metro" name. Since monopoly$oft said they are dropping the metro name for its new interface, I've been refuring to it as "turning my $3000.00 computer into a dumb phone" interface. And it still doesn't make phone calls.

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    I think MS has to do this, their main competitor is Apple. Why do we not hear or read that Apple is allowing other OEMs to produce iPad clones. It's because Apple won't allow it, they take all OEM's to court to safeguard their closed environment. So why all the fuss. I don't see the OEM's publishing their own OS. They rely on Google or Microsoft or Linux to do it, saving themselves from the R&D costs. And where is the uproar that Google is producing "Chrome Notebooks" or "Nexus phones" in competition with their OEM's. Why point the finger at Microsoft. The OEM's have had it too good for too long. Without MS we all would be stuck with a mish mush of proprietary Unix graphical interface systems, where an application would operate on one system but not on another.

    I have been in this industry since 1980. In those early years, there were many flavors of Unix. All unique to their respective hardware manufacturer. If an application was written for a DEC system, it wouldn't necessarily run on a Sun, Apollo, HP, Amdahl or IBM, etc. Each time it would have to be modified and recompiled. Then along came Microsoft with DOS, followed by Windows and we, the user community, could chose the OEM hardware. Never missing a beat by taking our purchased software from an old to new system. MS is the company that unified the OS to span all x86 systems.

    I take my hat off to Microsoft, for attempting to show their OEM's how to compete in the 21st century. The old paradigm is dead. It's time for a new methodology. Possibly the Microsoft way.

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