Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    132
    Thanks
    116
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Installing old programs

    I have a 10 year old audio/visual CD ROM giving the history of the British Civil War. The program is 16 bit and stated to be compatible with Windows 95, 98 and ME. I have tried to install it on my Windows 7 64 bit computer, trying all of the compatibility modes, but without success. Is there a practical way to get it to work or should I just dump it.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,625
    Thanks
    161
    Thanked 932 Times in 853 Posts
    Which version of Win 7, Home Premium, Pro or Ultimate. The last 2 have XP Mode available. There are ways to use VM's to install Win XP (32 Bit)

    Also Win 8 32 Bit does run some 16 Bit apps.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Medico For This Useful Post:

    mike21 (2012-08-30)

  4. #3
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    132
    Thanks
    116
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Home Premium 64 bit. It is not important enough to buy a copy of XP 32 bit.

  5. #4
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hillsborough (San Francisco Bay area), California, USA
    Posts
    587
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 59 Times in 58 Posts
    Mike,

    You might try copying the disk to a folder on your HD, setting the INSTALL program to run under Win XP compatibility, and see if that works.

    Zig

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Zig For This Useful Post:

    mike21 (2012-08-30)

  7. #5
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    10,357
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 1,162 Times in 1,069 Posts
    If you have a valid XP license you are not using, you can use VirtualBox to install XP and use the apps. VirtualBox is free.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to ruirib For This Useful Post:

    mike21 (2012-08-30)

  9. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    California & Arizona
    Posts
    5,481
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 499 Times in 459 Posts
    A shot in the dark here, but if the program comes with a separate dll files, try simultaneously placing them in the wow64 & windows32 bit directory.
    This has worked for me when getting DVD2AVI to run.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2012-09-12 at 00:06.

  10. #7
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    132
    Thanks
    116
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    I tried copying to a folder on the hard drive and running in various compatibility modes, but without success. Unfortunately I scrapped my old XP desktop without keeping the licence details – a moral here. I find the CD basically contains .AIF audio files and .MOV movie files, which I can play individually – I need to rename them all to something recognisable but then I shall have full access to all the material, although not as convenient as the original program. Thank you all.

  11. #8
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,327
    Thanks
    139
    Thanked 117 Times in 100 Posts
    The App is most likely a DOS App, and you would need a special Emulator Program to run it on Windows 7. Unfortunately, the old Windows XP DOS-Run Window hasn't been supported since Vista. I don't run DOS Apps, but one possible solution might be to set up a DOS Virtual Machine inside of Windows 7. You might need to get your hands on a licensed copy of DOS to do this, and modern hardware might not be able to run a DOS VM in any event. But it might be worth a try.

    One emulator which may work even in 64-bit Windows 7 is DOS Box. It is reported to have limited features, but maybe just enough to play that CD ROM. Windows 8 32-bit will be able to run many 16-bit DOS Apps, using its Legacy Modes. Hyper-V is also included with Windows 8 Pro, and may be able to set up a Virtual Hard Drive (VHD) for this purpose. But I think if it works, DOS Box under Windows 7 would be the simplest route.

    Someone who is still running Windows 98 or ME might be able to rip the CD ROM to a modern format.

    I wish I could have you over to my house, as my Dad runs Windows ME on his favorite computer. But I see you're in the UK, while I'm in the United States. I'm pretty sure the CD ROM would work beautifully on Dad's computer. The video might then be capable of being captured, as the hardware on Dad's computer is actually pretty up to date -- he just won't upgrade his usage habits to any newer OS version!
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2012-09-06 at 14:57.
    -- Bob Primak --

  12. #9
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Its the 64 bit Windows that is the root of the problem. Both Vista and 7 in the x86 (32 bit) versions will run 16 bit and DOS software; but, the x64 flavor of 7 has no 16 bit support. Ironically, most users and systems slow down using x64 as they need twice as much ram to meet par and the CPU's cache really gets hurt.
    If you really want it to work, you'ld need to reinstall using x86; but, your key is good for either and there is the benefit of never having the bloatware that comes on most systems. Microsoft will let you download 7 with SP1 so you can start fresh if you care to: http://www.mydigitallife.info/offici...digital-river/

  13. #10
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,327
    Thanks
    139
    Thanked 117 Times in 100 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DavisMcCarn View Post
    Its the 64 bit Windows that is the root of the problem. Both Vista and 7 in the x86 (32 bit) versions will run 16 bit and DOS software; but, the x64 flavor of 7 has no 16 bit support. Ironically, most users and systems slow down using x64 as they need twice as much ram to meet par and the CPU's cache really gets hurt.
    If you really want it to work, you'ld need to reinstall using x86; but, your key is good for either and there is the benefit of never having the bloatware that comes on most systems. Microsoft will let you download 7 with SP1 so you can start fresh if you care to: http://www.mydigitallife.info/offici...digital-river/
    DOS Box works in x64 systems. And Hyper-V and native support for some DOS features is said to work in 64-bit Windows 8. I haven't tried any of this, but my links do indicate support for these statements.
    -- Bob Primak --

  14. #11
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    In Win 7 you can install Microsoft Virtual PC 2007

    Quote Originally Posted by mike21 View Post
    "It is not important enough to buy a copy of XP 32 bit."
    If you have sent an old PC to the junkyard, you still have the right to use the old licence key for Windows 95, 98 or ME.
    You can install any old version of Windows in "Microsoft Virtual PC 2007".
    Download it from here:
    http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/downl....aspx?id=24439

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •