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  1. #16
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eikelein View Post
    That day will be early April 2014. And at that day you will likely not get any new systems with Windows 7 anymore, only Windows 8 or Apple Mac....

    If you are serious and if your current hardware supports it go to Windows 7 now.
    Re. Current hardware: In my experience you want at least a dual core CPU with >= 2Ghz, 4GB of RAM (the faster the better) and a Micro$oft approved graphics card. If you updated from Win2k to XP your current hardware most likely will not do it, sorry.
    By 2014, new PCs and devices will come with Windows 9 most likely.

    Windows XP can be run safely as a virtual machine inside of a Linux host OS. This could extend the lifetime of Windows XP indefinitely if you act soon. New licenses and activations would be the main issues for Windows XP then.

    Right now, there's no compelling reason to give up Windows XP if it serves your needs.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2012-09-28 at 07:55.
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  2. #17
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    Red face XP forever

    You could use xp forever put as a secondary machine , get another harddrive that matches your machine and dual boot it with windows 7
    as a old guy gamer I have machines dual boot win 98 ( for the game cossacks) with xp and another machine dual boot win xp with vista ( soon to be win 7 ) Dual boot is fantastic and there are free boot managers that can boot upto 5 systems on a machine . Dual or multi boot is the best way to go.

    Bob

  3. #18
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobFo View Post
    You could use xp forever put as a secondary machine , get another harddrive that matches your machine and dual boot it with windows 7
    as a old guy gamer I have machines dual boot win 98 ( for the game cossacks) with xp and another machine dual boot win xp with vista ( soon to be win 7 ) Dual boot is fantastic and there are free boot managers that can boot upto 5 systems on a machine . Dual or multi boot is the best way to go.

    Bob
    However, do keep in mind that a dual-boot does not put up a Walled Garden around either OS. Both can access each other's files.
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  4. #19
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Bob,

    Actually you can hide the boot drives from each other via a registry hack as follows:

    Hide Drive from View
    Key: HKLM\SYSTEM\MountedDevices\Offline
    Create a new DWord entry with:
    Name: \DosDevices\C:
    Type: REG_DWORD
    Value: 1

    Where C: is replaced by the drive to be hidden. Thus on each side of a dual boot machine you would hide the drive letter of the other copy of windows.
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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  5. #20
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    XP activation

    One fly in the ointment -- Windows XP uses an Activation Technology. It is therefore possible (though unlikely) that Microsoft could send a "Bullet" over the Internet to Windows XP and deactivate it. This would end its lifetime very quickly. But I don't think MS is interested in doing this. Not unless Windows 8 can't sell enough devices to break even -- also very unlikely.
    The above from BobPrimak.

    Maybe you know this, but the following registry patch will set that XP has been registered:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsNT\Cu rrentVersion

    Edit the string value Regdone to 1.

    Acknowledgements to the author of "Performance Tweaks for Windows XP".

    windyrij

  6. #21
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredGeek View Post
    Bob,

    Actually you can hide the boot drives from each other via a registry hack as follows:

    Hide Drive from View
    Key: HKLM\SYSTEM\MountedDevices\Offline
    Create a new DWord entry with:
    Name: \DosDevices\C:
    Type: REG_DWORD
    Value: 1

    Where C: is replaced by the drive to be hidden. Thus on each side of a dual boot machine you would hide the drive letter of the other copy of windows.
    Good to know, and actually, I have Acronis Disk Director, which can also hide partitions from each other without messing with the Registry directly. Very useful if trying to install two instances of the same OS version. Still, by default, this is not how a dual-boot is set up.

    In my laptop, I prefer to have total access to all partitions from anywhere. When scanning for malware, the Registry of only the current active partition will be scanned, but otherwise, all files everywhere can be scanned and archived from a single location this way. A Quick Scan of the remaining users and partitions will catch their Registry areas.

    For that matter, users can make their Folders private, and hide them even from Administrators in the same OS instance.

    No other downside (other than scanning issues) to hiding partitions or users that I can think of. But maybe even with the Registry Hack, some very clever malicious codes could break through?
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2012-09-30 at 04:33.
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  7. #22
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by windyrij View Post
    The above from BobPrimak.

    Maybe you know this, but the following registry patch will set that XP has been registered:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsNT\Cu rrentVersion

    Edit the string value Regdone to 1.

    Acknowledgements to the author of "Performance Tweaks for Windows XP".

    windyrij
    That may or may not work now, and in the future it would be very easy for Microsoft to place a Kill Switch into the System Kernel which would override any Registry Hack. I discovered that this is a very real possibility when certain antivirus programs accidentally placed a Kill Switch inside the Windows XP System Kernel as security drivers. I had to reinstall the OS from scratch. The online version of PrevX version 2, when it interacted with the then-current Zone Alarm Firewall (with its Kaspersky based security elements) was one of these programs.

    That same Registry Hack was posted by our very own DrWho (as DrWho07) in THIS THREAD in 2008, with the same "Performance Tweaks For Windows" Reference. Windows Activation Technology has changed since 2008, and the Hack no longer works if WGA or WAT is installed. SP3 installed WAT for everyone. Sorry, your hack seems to be way out of date.

    And to other Lounge members -- posting Windows Activation workarounds or other Cracks is against Lounge Policy. Don't do it.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2012-09-30 at 04:59.
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  9. #23
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Bob,

    I've been dual booting using this registry hack since XP due to loss of restore points. I don't know if this is still a problem but old habits die hard! As for the malware I have the same anti-malware setup on both boot partitions so that is not a problem. Personally, I also like to hide the unused boot partition just so I don't do anything stupid!
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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  10. #24
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredGeek View Post
    Bob,

    I've been dual booting using this registry hack since XP due to loss of restore points. I don't know if this is still a problem but old habits die hard! As for the malware I have the same anti-malware setup on both boot partitions so that is not a problem. Personally, I also like to hide the unused boot partition just so I don't do anything stupid!
    My Recovery Partitions are hidden on both of my laptops. They never need to be scanned and they do not contain data, so I don't want to risk messing them up, as you say. Hiding partitions also avoids overwriting of Restore Points, an issue I have in my Windows 7/ Windows 8 dual-boot. Only the Win 8 Restore Points seem to disappear, however. Windows 8 is the Lead OS in this dual-boot. Strange...

    My point about scanning all users is that they maintain their own views of the Registry, so a scan from one user or one partition will not scan the Registry as seen by other users. Otherwise, a single (deep) scan from an Administrator Account should be sufficient for the whole disk. Even Private Folders are scanned by most modern scanners. But Hidden Partitions would not be scanned, as they are not seen. I just prefer to be able to use Quick Scans of all users, and only one lengthy Deep Scan. Others may have other preferences.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2012-09-30 at 06:49.
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  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by steveothehighlander View Post
    l want to stay w/XP Pro Forever! l use Chrome, Avira av, SuperAntispyware, Spybot and Malwarebytes antimalware. And also use Works and Word. The av and antispyware programs are updated and used daily. This will be fine, right? l love my xp, and do not do anything to overwork the system, which is fine and if it works don't mess with it.....unless l'm forced to.....
    Regarding your use of Avira, SuperAntispyware, Spybot, and Malwarebytes, I tested (on Windows XP Pro) or researched all of these earlier this year. Free Avira was very good at detecting and blocking malware, and good at malware removal, but the free version could be turned off in a limited account, which is a security flaw. If you're using the paid version, try turning it off in the limited account. If it can't be turned off, then you're ok. SuperAntispyware, whether free or paid, was poor at malware detection, blocking, and removal. This worthless product is basically a scam. SpyBot, whether free or paid, is unnecessary. All modern antivirus software addresses all forms of malware, including spyware. Use of stand-alone antispyware is a relic of the past. Also, SpyBot requires manual updating, which is a security flaw. Malwarebytes, whether free or paid, was very good at malware removal, but poor at malware detection, so it's basically worthless.

    Microsoft stops supporting XP in 2014, so after that the operating system will be somewhat vulnerable. If you're willing to pay for malware protection, then the best available, especially for an older computer, is currently considered to be Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus. PC Magazine's test of this product last year found it to be the best antivirus product they've ever seen, with the only perfect malware blocking score they've ever encountered in their years of testing these products.

    If you want a free product, then avast! or AVG are good choices. Like free Avira, avast! can be turned off in a limited account, but unlike Avira, it can be password protected to prevent being turned off. The cloud service works well when the computer is connected to the internet, but when disconnected from the internet the cloud service will dramatically slow down your computer as the software searches for a connection. I use it with the cloud turned off all the time without any negative effect since any malware detected by the cloud will probably be blocked by a database update the same day. I install it without the e-mail module because to work with POP e-mail it turns off the SSL connection, which is a security flaw. E-mail scanning is somewhat silly, since your ISP should be blocking almost all e-mail embedded malware. If something gets through to your computer in an e-mail, it will be detected and removed by the main antivirus engine anyway as soon as the e-mail is opened. For support, the forum is better than e-mail.

    Free AVG has no browser cache protection or instant messaging protection; you must upgrade to the paid version to get Online Shield, which covers those two. But, if you don't use instant messaging and clear your browser cache on a regular basis, those are probably minor quibbles. As with avast!, I don't install the e-mail module with this one, either, because it doesn't work with POP for pre-2003 versions of Outlook. Immediately after installing AVG, turn off AVG Advisor and AVG Cache Server, both of which are annoying, unnecessary functions. AVG installs files that cannot be defragmented, so having it on your computer will cause defragmentation time to increase. Their support forum is very good.

    My ISP offers Norton AntiVirus for free to broadband subscribers, so I installed and tested that. It worked flawlessly for a while, and I was ready to consider it the best free antivirus software I ever used, but then it completely failed and I couldn't even get it to install properly. Very disappointing. Some ISPs are offering free McAfee antivirus software to their subscribers. Don't even consider it.

    By the way, when I test antivirus software I test one at a time, not all at the same time. I uninstall the previous product using more than one method to completely strip the computer of all remnants before installing the new software.
    Last edited by cloudsandskye; 2012-10-12 at 15:50. Reason: Revised description of avast! cloud service.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudsandskye View Post
    If you're willing to pay for malware protection, then the best available, especially for an older computer, is currently considered to be Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus. PC Magazine's test of this product last year found it to be the best antivirus product they've ever seen, with the only perfect malware blocking score they've ever encountered in their years of testing these products.
    The fact that you even make such a statement, I am sorry to say it, I find it completely amazing. Who makes such a statement? PC Magazine? Last year? Do you know how long a year is in terms of AV effectiveness? Shall we believe PC Magazine, or should we believe the results of AV comparatives, for the period of March -June 2012, where Webroot ranked last among all the products tested?

    Personally I would never make a statement such as that one, because it simply is impossible to prove and often, it can be easy to counterprove (how does the best AV product rank last in testing?!).
    I prefer to go by what I would call a good product (I quite like the classification made by AV Comparatives, that simply grades tested apps by levels - advanced, standard, tested). I am not even sure I would include Webroot in my personal choices (I actually I am quite sure I would not). There are several such products and none, I repeat, none, can ensure total safety from infection. That's why I believe in using a multi-layered approach, which does not rely on any single product, no matter how good I consider it. An antimalware app, a HIPS, an hardware firewall and a regular backup strategy are all included in my own strategy, which has the goal to minimize the risk of getting infected and the losses that I may incur, if I get infected. That's really all you can expect, IMHO.

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  14. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    The fact that you even make such a statement, I am sorry to say it, I find it completely amazing. Who makes such a statement? PC Magazine? Last year? Do you know how long a year is in terms of AV effectiveness? Shall we believe PC Magazine, or should we believe the results of AV comparatives, for the period of March -June 2012, where Webroot ranked last among all the products tested?

    Personally I would never make a statement such as that one, because it simply is impossible to prove and often, it can be easy to counterprove (how does the best AV product rank last in testing?!).
    I prefer to go by what I would call a good product (I quite like the classification made by AV Comparatives, that simply grades tested apps by levels - advanced, standard, tested). I am not even sure I would include Webroot in my personal choices (I actually I am quite sure I would not). There are several such products and none, I repeat, none, can ensure total safety from infection. That's why I believe in using a multi-layered approach, which does not rely on any single product, no matter how good I consider it. An antimalware app, a HIPS, an hardware firewall and a regular backup strategy are all included in my own strategy, which has the goal to minimize the risk of getting infected and the losses that I may incur, if I get infected. That's really all you can expect, IMHO.
    In any industry there is the best, the worst, and those in between. Antivirus software is no different. I have no problem repeating what PC Magazine stated, which is that at the time of their test in December, they considered the Webroot product "...the best we've ever seen." So what if it was tested last year? A good antivirus product is in a constant state of evolution through its online updating process for both the database and the engine. Whether it was tested in December of last year or June of this year isn't going to make any difference; it is not a static product. Granted, such rankings change from year to year because it's a very competitive industry, but that's how PC Magazine saw it. Maximum PC was also very impressed with the Webroot product. Over 400 customers at amazon.com who bought the product rank it as the number one antivirus software based on their customer review scores. As for the low ranking at AV-Comparatives, Webroot acquired a company last year and as a result of that acquisition they completely redesigned their antivirus software with a new, innovative approach. As a result, the testing methodology at AV-Comparatives and the other third party antivirus testers doesn't work properly with the Webroot product. You can read more about that here: http://blog.webroot.com/2012/07/19/w...tives-results/ Is the Webroot product perfect? Of course not; nothing's perfect. Which is why I agree that a multilayered approach is best.
    Last edited by cloudsandskye; 2012-10-11 at 00:08.

  15. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by eikelein View Post
    That day will be early April 2014. And at that day you will likely not get any new systems with Windows 7 anymore, only Windows 8 or Apple Mac....

    If you are serious and if your current hardware supports it go to Windows 7 now.
    Re. Current hardware: In my experience you want at least a dual core CPU with >= 2Ghz, 4GB of RAM (the faster the better) and a Micro$oft approved graphics card. If you updated from Win2k to XP your current hardware most likely will not do it, sorry.
    Actually, since I posted the above, I have upgraded to Windows 7 (actually, I did a clean install). Works great, the wife loves it -- it is her computer.

    The only thing remaining on XP are the two computers that aren't internet connected.

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    Yes, you can keep using Xp safely forever. I got a brand new computer in 2013 and of course used Dban on it right away so I could put a real operating system on it, Xp. I found out firsthand how well that goes, I got a fullscreen full takeover virus. So, I Dbaned it again, installed Xp again, and called a really good antivirus company, and...? They said they have no problem fully protecting Xp computers!

    Long story short, Microsoft is lying. But you can't really blame them. They perfected their main product long ago, and now they still gotta make a buck. Even so, they need to find an honorable solution and quick, or bad karma will continue to haunt them all the way to zero dollars.
    Last edited by anonymous_windowssecrets; 2014-05-16 at 00:07.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    We have a network which is not connected to the internet. I can run anything I want on that network, because I'm not concerned about security issues. For a long while, I ran Windows 2000. There was no need to upgrade to anything else, until I could no longer get video cards for Windows 2000 (AGP video architecture). At that point I upgraded to XP, but only because of the video card problem.

    However, on the internet-connected network, I have nothing older than XP sp3, because I want to make sure that I keep getting patches and that my security software will continue to protect the computers.

    When XP no longer can be adequately protected, I will go to what can be adequately protected (probably Windows 7).
    Awhile ago, actually around the time that this thread was current, I was interviewing for a job with a contractor who worked for the FBI at Quantico, VA. I checked in at the Visitors Center, before proceeding through the gate, and to the office building where the interview took place.

    All the public facing computers in the Visitors Center were running Windows 2000. I didn't have to get on them, and I doubt that they were on the internet, but they were probably using software that would not run on newer operating systems.

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