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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    Recovery disk is nearly full

    My wife has an eMachines computer running Windows 7. She frequently gets a message saying that the Recovery drive [D:] is nearly full.

    There must be a way to fix this, but I can't find it.

    Who can help?
    Lou Sander
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    USA

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    Is the drive nearly full?

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    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    Local disk [C:] - 107 GB free of 144 GB

    Recovery [D:] - 1.17 MB free of 4.37 MB
    Lou Sander
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    USA

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    That can happen if she is inadvertently moving files/data to that partition in error.
    Open up windows explorer, or drive manager, and check it's status.

    If files/data have been inadvertently moved to that drive, they will very meticulously need to be removed.
    If you remove the wrong files you will no longer have a "recovery drive".
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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    Lou Sander (2012-10-01)

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    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    I will try to check that out. She is a VERY unsophisticated user, and doesn't do much saving of ANYTHING. But I guess something like an email attachment could conceiveably go astray onto the D: drive.
    Lou Sander
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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    5 Star Lounger Lou Sander's Avatar
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    Your suggestion guided me to the solution, which was a bit different than suspected:

    I looked at the drive using Windows Explorer. There was a folder-like item, but without the typical folder icon, named "emachines". I double-clicked it and got a menu that included a selection to manage the size of the files on the disk. Clicking that menu item showed me three "Data Backups" and gave me a choice of which one or ones to delete. I deleted the oldest one, and now there's plenty of room.

    The Data Backups each included a range of dates. The range on the third one was only a single day. I speculate that the system tried to do a data backup, encountered a lack of space, and backed up only a fraction of what it wanted to back up. That's just a guess, though. Also a guess is that the system somehow manages these data backups, erasing the old one(s) when a new one is saved. Maybe something went wrong during one of them, giving me a nearly-dull disk with an old backup(s) not properly deleted.
    Lou Sander
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  9. #7
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    How large is the "recovery drive"?
    What type of backup was it? [image based vs compressed file/folder copy]

    It sounds like a backup was initiated but there was no other place to put it, but the recovery drive, so the software may have defaulted to it.

    Usually the recovery drive is static and of very limited size. Not intended to be usable for anything other than
    the computers restoration image. An external drive would be the preferable location for any backup other than the
    computers default bootable recovery partition.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2012-10-01 at 13:35.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
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    The recovery drive/partition holds files needed to recover your computer. It is usually not accessible by users. Any messing with this area can make a real mess of your computer if you ever need to recover from a crash. Be very careful what you do. Best if you check with the computer maker before doing anything, or you could be sorry.
    Check out this answer/explanation from AskLeo.com http://ask-leo.com/what_should_i_do_...ery_drive.html
    Last edited by sj_ken; 2012-10-05 at 01:36.

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    Arrow There shouldn't be backups on D:

    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    It sounds like a backup was initiated but there was no other place to put it, but the recovery drive, so the software may have defaulted to it.

    Usually the recovery drive is static and of very limited size. Not intended to be usable for anything other than
    the computers restoration image. An external drive would be the preferable location for any backup other than the
    computers default bootable recovery partition.
    To expand on Clint's answer: The default Win7 installation creates what's called a "system partition" for storing the software needed to do a "system recovery" in the event that the Win7 installation on C: goes bad and the system won't boot to Windows (it's optional, though, so not all systems have this system partition). Also, some manufacturers create a special partition on their systems that contains an image backup of the factory Windows installation (also usable in case the Windows instance on C: goes south).

    It's been a while since I've worked with either one (so anyone else out there feel free to correct me), but I think I recall that the Windows system partition is hidden, and doesn't have an assigned drive letter (but is visible in Windows' Disk Management utility). Manufacturers' recovery image partitions, on the other hand, typically are assigned drive letters. What's puzzling, here, is the sized you're reporting for D: (4.37 MB), as that sounds too small to have a system recovery image file. Still, the "eMachines" folder makes me suspect that you're dealing with the latter case (or, at least, something like it).

    So what's trying to create a backup file? Well, I'd be curious to know the creation and modified dates on those files. If the dates precede your ownership of the computer, then it sounds like something that the manufacturer put in place, perhaps leftover files from some manufacturing process that should have been deleted before shipping (unless it was an open box item when you purchased it, in which case either store personnel or an original purchaser could be responsible). If this is the case, then it may be that Windows is just noticing the small amount of space remaining (and it may be less than what's being reported, if there are hidden files on D: that you aren't seeing in Explorer), and that your deleting the one file fixed that.

    If the dates are recent, then I'd say that something is running that's trying to create more files, generating the error message. In that case, you need to ask your wife whether she (or perhaps some friend?) had something to do with this--backup programs don't just start up on their own, not even Windows Backup. It's possible that the manufacturer shipped the system with scheduled backups already running, but I've never heard of one that did.

    If you can identify what software is trying to back up D:, then shut it down--you don't need to back up that drive.

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