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  1. #1
    4 Star Lounger
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    Is Wireless as safe as a hardwire connection?

    Hi,

    My computer did not come with wireless capabilities, so I got a Netgear N300 Wireless USB Adapter. Once I disconnect the hardwire connection between the cable company and my computer and install the Netgear Wireless USB Adapter, will my computer continue to be as secure?

    Thank you for your thoughts on this.

    Moon

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    You would have to set up the wireless security on your router. I have a Linksys router and use WPA security with a strong password. WPA is the strongest security available. You can also set up the router to block all but the PC's you set up in the Mac address filter. This Mac filter can be broken by someone who really wants to, but it will keep your neighbors from using your internet access.

    LinksysE4200.jpg

    CiscoWireless1.jpg

    I have blocked out my key for obvious reasons. My router has both a 2.4 GHz band and a 5 GHz band. This is a function of the router. For those who have the 5 GHz band available, take a look at the difference:

    inSSIDer2.4.jpg

    inSSIDer5.jpg

    You can see in my busy neighborhood, I'm the only router on the 5 GHz band, nice!
    Last edited by Medico; 2012-10-05 at 06:21.
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  3. #3
    4 Star Lounger
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    Thank you Medico. I will use WPA security with a strong password.

    Have a very good one.

    Moon

  4. #4
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    The simplest answer to your original question is No, a wireless connection will always be less secure than a wired ethernet connection, because a hacker has something to work with - the broadcast data packets - whereas s/he would need physical access to your home to tap into a wired connection.

    You can significantly reduce the possibility of wireless hacking by using WPA2 in conjunction with AES - and as secure a password as you can devise, as Ted says. See Steve Gibson's effort.
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

  5. #5
    4 Star Lounger
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    Thanks BATcher. I very quickly reviewed Steve Gibson's work and plan to give it a thorough reading. I currently know nothing about WPA2 and AES, but I will research both before I set up my wireless. If I have any prolems, I will contact the Lounge.

    Have a wonderful weekend...

    moon

  6. #6
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Look at my screen shots above. WPA2 is the highest level of security available at present on a wireless router.
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  7. #7
    4 Star Lounger
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    My wireless connection is set up and I do have WPA2 security. You along with my cable company tell me it is quite secure. Great!

    Thanks medico. Have a great day.

  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    My last post was originally posted to answer what turned out to be a spammer inquiry. Hence it's somewhat out of place, yet still pertinent so I will leave it.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  9. #9
    3 Star Lounger
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    Another thing you can do is limit the range of IP addresses that your router will give out, and associate these with MAC addresses. For example, if you have two computers on your network, limit the IP range to (say) 192.168.0 150 to 192.168.0.151, and assign the relevant MAC address to each IP address.

  10. #10
    New Lounger
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    Limit your router's range

    In addition to the good ideas above, judicious location of the router can further limit your exposure. I have my router located in the center of my basement. The concrete and ground shield the signal from neighbors and from the street while still allowing good reception throughout the house.

  11. #11
    4 Star Lounger
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    I had no idea that putting the router in the basement made a contribution to security. Thanks bmong for sharing that. I don't have a basement, but perhaps there is some other spot in the house that can give me good protection. Do you have any ideas?

    Have a very good one...

  12. #12
    Lounger
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    One item to consider is without the hardware firewall providied in the router, you may be less secure. Than wireless with WPA2 security enabled.

  13. #13
    New Lounger
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    You can also log details about who is using your wireless


    Wireless bandwidth theft is an issue that many ignore.
    Some are not even aware of the issues.

    Others are keen to attach themselves to any free wireless network they can get their hands on and don't give a hoot about using OPM "other peoples money".

    We wrote an article about this at http://www.pcprofile.com/Who_Else_Is...ess_Router.pdf and offer a low cost logging solution to monitor activity of other users who may be tapping into your Open/WEP/WPA2 systems.

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