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  1. #1
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    Windows 7 disconnects Logitech usb headphones

    Windows 7 x64 Home premium on Dell Inspiron N5040.

    Windows disconnects Logitech usb headphones 9 minutes after plugging them in. I first noticed this working with Skype. I then discovered that they were totally disappearing from the available devices at the same moment. Unplugging and then replugging does not cause them to be re-recognized. Wiggling the wires around has no effect to either disconnect or reconnect (broken wire therefore ruled out).

    If I just work with the built-in microphone and a normal headset, things work. After a few minutes (at least 15) replugging them in works, but now only for about, perhaps 2 minutes.

    Has anyone had a similar problem? ... a solution?

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    I haven't had exactly that problem, but here's something that may help: disable the legacy audio and mike connections. Do it logged in as a PC administrator. Perhaps there's a conflict there.

    In my case, I have USB speakers. If I decide to use the legacy audio port, I must first disable the USB audio in Device Manager; then and only then will the legacy audio port work. To switch back to USB audio, I reenable it, which turns off the legacy audio.

  3. #3
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    If everything is ok until 9 minutes, it sounds like you may have an overheating problem. Your laptop may be full of dust where the hot air is supposed to blow out. If the laptop is overheating, all sorts of problem can result.

    There is a free program called Speedfan, which will show you if your laptop is overheating.

    Another test: when you lose the USB audio / mike, feel the bottom of the laptop, to see if it is excessively hot. Then put your hand in front of where the exhaust air is supposed to blow out. If the air coming out is not hot, but the bottom of the laptop is very hot at that spot, I'd say your exhaust vent / fan is clogged with dust.

    The quick-fix for dust blocking the exhaust is to simply blow compressed air into the exhaust port, busting up the clog. However, the problem is that you are blowing air (and dust) IN rather than OUT. To fix it right, you will need to disassemble the laptop, blow out the dust, then reassemble it. If you don't feel competent to do that, then don't do it, because you can easily cause further damage if you don't know what you are doing.

    If you do disassemble the laptop, I would highly recommend that you remove the heat sink from the CPU, clean both surfaces (the heat sink and the CPU), and remount the heat sink to the CPU with high-quality thermal grease, available at Radio Shack (they don't call it "thermal grease"; I can't recall what Radio Shack calls it). High-quality thermal grease will lower the CPU temp, because it is likely a better conductor of heat than what is currently used in your laptop.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2012-10-22 at 17:15.

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