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Thread: Just curious

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    Just curious

    When discussing installations for dual-boot with Ubuntu, for example, for which a new version was released the other day, writers seem invariably to talk about burning a downloaded ISO to disk or flash drive. This lets you try before you install, but is there anything wrong with just extracting it to a folder on your drive, and installing it from that to the unallocated space that you have set aside for its destination?

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    It's a good question, to which I don't have a good answer because I've never tried it!

    But I would be interested to know how you would set up the dual-boot mechanism (EasyBCD?), and how you would actually install Ubuntu from your folder within the Windows partition into what will be the Ubuntu partition.

    Windows is installed from a bootable DVD/CD and so (usually) are most operating systems.

    For interest, have you thought of running Ubuntu under WINE, where your Ubuntu file system is simply a large 'file' within the Windows partition, and you can boot into either operating system? It's slower than a 'native' installation and you have to be very thorough in closing down Windows 'normally'.
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

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    BATcher,

    I've not tried the WINE approach - perhaps a project for 'Ron' (lateR-ON). I have found installing the Linux system in a virtual machine (I prefer the free VMware Player) the most convenient solution. Installing the Linux Tools is a bit of a pain, but apart from that, it's easier to install new versions.

    Chris

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    I realized after your post that the reason for the CD or flash is that it is a boot device, and the hard drive is accordingly just a drive to perform operations on, which is the reason that even within a given OS it is preferable to use a boot disk for partitioning and data recovery, etc. I also remembered all of the online operations that you typically perform in setting the thing up, at least to the extent of downloading software for it and so forth (although that could be done later).

    Anyway, I definitely talked myself out of it in one big hurry thanks to your reminder that it is a boot CD that is being used. I was pretty sure there had to be something wrong with it, but I couldn't think what. Thank you very much for the help.

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    Dual developments

    It seems there are a number of ways of accomplishing what I asked about, and then decided against. You might be interested in the comments on this article (toward the end).

    That, of course, uses an NTFS partition, but so long as it has a drive letter different from the source, a Linux OS would presumably reformat it to suit and install it in that location, leaving the source partition and folder intact.

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