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  1. #1
    Star Lounger GiddyUpGo's Avatar
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    Wireless computer takes over the internet

    I have 2 hardwired computers and 1 wireless computer on my network.
    When the wireless computer is connected, (My daughter's) and she is downloading moves, etc., the other 2 computers slow down to a slow crawl. Her computer is taking up all of the bandwidth.
    I have the Netgear WNDR4500 router. We are on a DSL connection. (Locked in where we live. Just was able to get off dial-up a couple of years ago).
    Is there a way to throttle down the wireless connection so the wired connection can work OK. The two wired connections work great together.
    I know a little about the Netgear QoS rules. Is there a rule that would work for this? OR is there something that would work to even out the bandwith.

    If I need to dl updates or need the connection real bad, my daughter has to shut down her computer. If you have kids you know that this is not a good answer.
    Any help will be appreciated very much from all of us!
    GiddyUpGo "Don't look back. That is not the direction you are going!"

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    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    Unfortunately QoS is more biased towards the outgoing traffic so the rules may not help.

    What may be worth trying would be to change the wireless protocol to the lowest speed available, eg Wireless 'B' rather than 'G' or 'N'.

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    Star Lounger GiddyUpGo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Browni View Post
    Unfortunately QoS is more biased towards the outgoing traffic so the rules may not help.

    What may be worth trying would be to change the wireless protocol to the lowest speed available, eg Wireless 'B' rather than 'G' or 'N'.
    I had tried changing some rules with QoS and did not find any change. You answer on the QoS answers my question on that. Thanks!

    I now have "N/WPA" settings. Would changing the wireless protocol to "B" change the security? My daughter plays games with her friends....
    GiddyUpGo "Don't look back. That is not the direction you are going!"

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Here are some ways to get a handle on the situation:

    * You can set a schedule in the router for when wireless connectivity will be available. Give her wireless access only when no one else is on.

    * You can run a wire to her room (i.e. take her off of wireless), and put her on a low-priority router port. Also, you can plug a 4-port switch into a low-priority router port, and plug in her computer plus three other devices to the switch. This will give her 1/4 of the bandwidth that the router port puts out.

    * You can block whatever websites she is downloading from. And you can exempt one computer (e.g. yours) from the blocking.

    * If she won't stop downloading, you can block her MAC address from being able to access the internet, then unblock it if she will promise to obey the rules.

    * You can get the router version of the American Family Filter. This filter blocks objectionable websites for all computers connected to your router. It is possible that some or all of her download websites are on the AFF block list.

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiddyUpGo View Post
    If I need to dl updates or need the connection real bad, my daughter has to shut down her computer. If you have kids you know that this is not a good answer.
    Why not?

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    Star Lounger GiddyUpGo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    Why not?
    Why Not? Well I have a very responsible daughter that is willing to shut her computer down anytime she is asked. I do not wish to block her. I just want to slow her computer down so all of us can use the network at the same time.
    You note on using a 4-port switch might be an answer for me. I will look into the purchase of one to try.
    Thank you for your input!
    GiddyUpGo "Don't look back. That is not the direction you are going!"

  9. #7
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiddyUpGo View Post
    Why Not? Well I have a very responsible daughter that is willing to shut her computer down anytime she is asked. I do not wish to block her. I just want to slow her computer down so all of us can use the network at the same time.
    You note on using a 4-port switch might be an answer for me. I will look into the purchase of one to try.
    Thank you for your input!
    Sounds like putting her on a wire would be the easiest way to throttle her connection. I'm not sure how to do it on wireless.

    If it was me (and I don't want to tell you how to raise your kids, sounds like you're already doing a good job), I'd put my computer on one router port, and I'd set that port to high-priority; I would then plug in a switch to another router port, and I'd put all other devices on the switch. In this way, I would always have half of the total bandwidth (all others would share the remaining half), and I'd always have priority.

    (In fact, if you do this, it may be that no one would even know that you have done anything, just that for some reason you have stopped complaining about the bandwidth.)

    Unless, of course, someone else was willing to pay the internet bill every month. In that case, that person would get the high-priority port and half the bandwidth.

    But that's just me...
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2012-11-26 at 12:08.

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    Star Lounger GiddyUpGo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    Sounds like putting her on a wire would be the easiest way to throttle her connection. I'm not sure how to do it on wireless.

    If it was me (and I don't want to tell you how to raise your kids, sounds like you're already doing a good job), I'd put my computer on one router port, and I'd set that port to high-priority; I would then plug in a switch to another router port, and I'd put all other devices on the switch. In this way, I would always have half of the total bandwidth (all others would share the remaining half), and I'd always have priority.

    (In fact, if you do this, it may be that no one would even know that you have done anything, just that for some reason you have stopped complaining about the bandwidth.)

    Unless, of course, someone else was willing to pay the internet bill every month. In that case, that person would get the high-priority port and half the bandwidth.

    But that's just me...
    This could be what I need to do. Running a wire would be hard, but could be done. I have the Netgear N 900 WNDR 4500 router. I bought this fast router hopping it would fix this, but no better than old router. (I know, it is my DSL bandwidth)
    To match my router, which switch would you recommend? Best way to hook up the switch? I have never done this before.
    Thank you for your reply!
    GiddyUpGo "Don't look back. That is not the direction you are going!"

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    Star Lounger GiddyUpGo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    Sounds like putting her on a wire would be the easiest way to throttle her connection. I'm not sure how to do it on wireless.<br>
    <br>
    If it was me (and I don't want to tell you how to raise your kids, sounds like you're already doing a good job), I'd put my computer on one router port, and I'd set that port to high-priority; I would then plug in a switch to another router port, and I'd put all other devices on the switch. In this way, I would always have half of the total bandwidth (all others would share the remaining half), and I'd always have priority.<br>
    <br>
    (In fact, if you do this, it may be that no one would even know that you have done anything, just that for some reason you have stopped complaining about the bandwidth.)<br>
    <br>
    Unless, of course, someone else was willing to pay the internet bill every month. In that case, that person would get the high-priority port and half the bandwidth.<br>
    <br>
    But that's just me...
    This could be what I need to do. Running a wire would be hard, but could be done. I have the Netgear N 900 WNDR 4500 router. I bought this fast router hopping it would fix this, but no better than old router. (I know, it is my DSL bandwidth)<br>To match my router, which switch would you recommend? Best way to hook up the switch? I have never done this before.<br>Thank you for your reply!
    GiddyUpGo "Don't look back. That is not the direction you are going!"

  13. #10
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Any switch should work. And there's nothing to configure; simply plug and play. Nothing to it at all.

    But I'd probably get a Netgear switch, just to stay the same as your router (to minimize compatibility issues). You can order it from newegg.com:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...=netgear fs605

    And to make your life easy in terms of running a wire to her room, try a powerline adapter:
    http://netgear.com/home/products/pow.../XAVB1301.aspx#
    (The Newegg website just went down, so I gave you the Netgear link instead.)

    It uses the electric wiring in your house to make the wired connection, so you won't have to run any wires; simply plug in one piece near your router, and then connect it with an ethernet cable to one of the ports on the switch. Then plug in the other piece in your daughter's bedroom, and connect it with an ethernet cable to her computer.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2012-11-26 at 14:07.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    * You can run a wire to her room (i.e. take her off of wireless), and put her on a low-priority router port. Also, you can plug a 4-port switch into a low-priority router port, and plug in her computer plus three other devices to the switch. This will give her 1/4 of the bandwidth that the router port puts out.
    Are there home grade routers that allow port prioritization?

  15. #12
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    Are there home grade routers that allow port prioritization?
    On GiddyUpGo's router, he can set up QoS (Quality of Service):
    Choose Advanced / Setup / QoS Setup.
    Click Setup Qos Rule, then Add Priority Rule.
    Set Priority Category to Ethernet LAN Port.
    Set LAN Port to whichever port he is plugged into.
    Set Priority to Highest.

    (Alternatively, you could set your daughter's port to Low Priority.)

    Or, another way would be to grant priority to the MAC address, rather than the port. In this way, it won't matter which port you (or she) are plugged into.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2012-11-26 at 15:03.

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    Ok, thanks for the info .

  18. #14
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Several years ago, I had a basic Linksys wired router, and it allowed you to prioritize the ports, although not the MAC addresses.

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    I have had two Linksys routers and two Belkin ones and this was never a possibility.

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