Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Garrisonville, Virginia
    Posts
    284
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Question Scanning old slides with an HP Officejet Pro 8500 A909a

    First of all, I hope this is the appropriate place for this thread, but I need some help. First of all, I am using the following hardware/software, then my question will follow:

    Printer/scanner - HP Officejet Pro 8500 A909a all-in-one set up as a network device.
    Computer - Dell XPS Studio deskton running on 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium SP1

    I've use it for a couple of years now and all is working very well together, but my "problem" is that I want to begin scanning some old 35 mm slides to file, either in the computer or to flash drive. I am told that it can be done with my current HP Officejet 8500 but I have been experimenting with it and cannot seem to make it happen. Can someone out there who knows what he/she is doing (obviously, that lets me out) confirm for me either that it either can or cannot be done, please? I find no mention of that capability in the User Guide for the machine, so I am trying here. I have found vague reference to an optional "framework-like" device that can be purchased to put the slides in and copy them to hard drive, but I am also told it is not needed with this machine, and it can be done without it.

    If it cannot be done with this machine, then perhaps someone could recommend one of the stand-alone devices I have seen advertised that are designed for this very purpose. However, once I scan somewhere over 1,000 old slides, I will never have the need for it again so I would prefer not spending a lot of money on it if that is avoidable, especially as a retiree on a limited income in these trying times. If there are any suggestions out there, I would welcome hearing from you. I find nothing in the User Guide for the machine or on the HP webpage that tells me anything, so I am trying here.
    Last edited by decann; 2012-12-03 at 10:56.

    David E. Cann

  2. Subscribe to our Windows Secrets Newsletter - It's Free!

    Get our unique weekly Newsletter with tips and techniques, how to's and critical updates on Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows XP, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Google, etc. Join our 480,000 subscribers!

    Excel 2013: The Missing Manual

    + Get this BONUS — free!

    Get the most of Excel! Learn about new features, basics of creating a new spreadsheet and using the infamous Ribbon in the first chapter of Excel 2013: The Missing Manual - Subscribe and download Chapter 1 for free!

  3. #2
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    4,614
    Thanks
    66
    Thanked 525 Times in 474 Posts
    You could try the method detailed here:
    http://www.abstractconcreteworks.com...cklighter.html

    Or just go to a place like Wal Mart which will scan your slides and transfer them to a DVD.

    Jerry

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to jwitalka For This Useful Post:

    decann (2012-12-04)

  5. #3
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Garrisonville, Virginia
    Posts
    284
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    I had thought of having someone scan them for me, but based on my research most places charge from 25 to 40 cents per slide, which ought to run about $500. I can by a slide scanner and do it myself for $50 to $100. I've also seen mentioned something called a "TMA" that sits on the platen of a flatbed scanner, but I've been unable to find one that states it would work with my HP Officejet.
    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    You could try the method detailed here:
    http://www.abstractconcreteworks.com...cklighter.html

    Or just go to a place like Wal Mart which will scan your slides and transfer them to a DVD.

    Jerry

    David E. Cann

  6. #4
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    182
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 39 Times in 33 Posts
    decann,

    If you follow the DIY link Jerry mentioned it should dawn on you that the key difference with slides is that the light needs to go through the slide, not bounce off of it like scanning a print photo. Consider that basic fact when evaluating all of those various contraptions as to how well they might (or might not) work.

    Some flatbed scanners have an accessory lid that puts a lamp in the lid instead of in the base. When scanning slides the lid lamp is used instead of the base lamp. The light shines only from the back of the slide, passing from the lid through the slide to the image sensor in the base.

    Anything that uses the lamp in the base (such as the DIY link) just isn't going to work as well because it's shining light on the slide from either just the front (lousy results), or from front and back simultaneously (so-so results).

    When you put a slide on a traditional flatbed's platen the actual film itself is held slightly off the glass by the cardboard surrounding the slide, which could lead to a slightly out of focus image when scanning at high resolutions--something one might do when working with such tiny source material. Dedicated slide/film scanners have a theoretical advantage in that they can be designed to hold the film precisely in the sensor's focal plane for sharpest scans. I say "theoretical" because whether they're actually any better is probably more a function of manufacturing quality control.

    If it's of any help, take a look at a comparison I did several years ago of a slide/film scanner and two flatbeds (both with the accessory lids for slide scanning) for a friend (a photography buff) and my daughter (an artist). I own the Epson 4490, my daughter has the 2400, and my friend has the Tamarack. Ignore the actual models involved because they're all old by now, but it may help you get a sense for what results are attainable with common consumer hardware. Note these are not scans of photographs, they are scans of either 35mm film negatives or 35mm slides.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to dg1261 For This Useful Post:

    decann (2012-12-04),ruosChalet (2012-12-08)

  8. #5
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Garrisonville, Virginia
    Posts
    284
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Jerry, given the facts as I know them from my homework on the subject, I will most likely pick one of the slide scanners out there (possibly on eBay) and finish the project. It just bothers me though that I have to spend money for a device that I will never use again, but that is the way life goes I suppose. I will do some more research on the features of those available as well as cost, and probably decide on one of them if/when our limited cash flow survives the holidays. It would be a good indoor project while it is cold outside. Thank you for the help and advice.

    Also, I note you are in Northern California. I am retired now and in the Washington, D. C. suburbs, but I was born and raised in Santa Clara County near San Jose. I still have family in the SF Bay Area, but with kids and grandkids here we are probably here to stay now. Thank you again.
    Quote Originally Posted by dg1261 View Post
    decann,

    If you follow the DIY link Jerry mentioned it should dawn on you that the key difference with slides is that the light needs to go through the slide, not bounce off of it like scanning a print photo. Consider that basic fact when evaluating all of those various contraptions as to how well they might (or might not) work.

    Some flatbed scanners have an accessory lid that puts a lamp in the lid instead of in the base. When scanning slides the lid lamp is used instead of the base lamp. The light shines only from the back of the slide, passing from the lid through the slide to the image sensor in the base.

    Anything that uses the lamp in the base (such as the DIY link) just isn't going to work as well because it's shining light on the slide from either just the front (lousy results), or from front and back simultaneously (so-so results).

    When you put a slide on a traditional flatbed's platen the actual film itself is held slightly off the glass by the cardboard surrounding the slide, which could lead to a slightly out of focus image when scanning at high resolutions--something one might do when working with such tiny source material. Dedicated slide/film scanners have a theoretical advantage in that they can be designed to hold the film precisely in the sensor's focal plane for sharpest scans. I say "theoretical" because whether they're actually any better is probably more a function of manufacturing quality control.

    If it's of any help, take a look at a comparison I did several years ago of a slide/film scanner and two flatbeds (both with the accessory lids for slide scanning) for a friend (a photography buff) and my daughter (an artist). I own the Epson 4490, my daughter has the 2400, and my friend has the Tamarack. Ignore the actual models involved because they're all old by now, but it may help you get a sense for what results are attainable with common consumer hardware. Note these are not scans of photographs, they are scans of either 35mm film negatives or 35mm slides.

    David E. Cann

  9. #6
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    4,614
    Thanks
    66
    Thanked 525 Times in 474 Posts
    Perhaps you can put the slide scanner up for sale on Ebay or Craig's List when you're done with it to recoup some of your costs.

    Jerry

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to jwitalka For This Useful Post:

    decann (2012-12-04)

  11. #7
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Garrisonville, Virginia
    Posts
    284
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    I thought about that, but I will make that decision when the time comes. It occurred to me that I have a good friend who is an amateur (but very skilled) photographer, and I am wondering if he can help with this.
    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    Perhaps you can put the slide scanner up for sale on Ebay or Craig's List when you're done with it to recoup some of your costs.

    Jerry

    David E. Cann

  12. #8
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,137
    Thanks
    202
    Thanked 206 Times in 198 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by decann View Post
    I thought about that, but I will make that decision when the time comes. It occurred to me that I have a good friend who is an amateur (but very skilled) photographer, and I am wondering if he can help with this.
    Your friend might buy your scanner from you once you have finished with it. Or, maybe he will hire you as needed to scan slides.

  13. #9
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Dear David:
    Here’s an article I’ve written which addresses the DIY or send them out tradeoffs: http://dpsdave.hubpages.com/hub/Scan...nts-and-slides

    Doing it yourself will require purchasing a new scanner, and you get what you pay for. The scanners priced below $100 produce low quality scans, and are slow. Sending 1,000 slides out to http://www.dpsdave.com/index.html will cost $250.

  14. #10
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Posts
    3,855
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 177 Times in 163 Posts
    A simple, though slow, alternative, is to use a digital camera with a decent macro function to photograph the slides. Simply set them up with a neutral light source (eg daylight) behind them beforehand. With a bit of ingenuity you could even adapt one of those old slide viewers so that you don't have to keep adjusting your camera position & focus. Any typical 12MP pocket camera should have enough resolution (works out at about 2800-2850dpi).
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •