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  1. #16
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    See Browni how many varied opinions there on about this type of email...
    And, all the opinions are from some pretty knowledgeable people here.

    One of the reasons these phishing emails are so successful is that people who don't have the skills of detecting them as a scam will go to the site and give up their info.

    If everyone could spot a Phish then they would not be sent out but because a few will fall for it is the reason they keep getting sent out.

    I have read about some pretty smart people falling for them because they let their guard down.
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Bourke View Post
    I wouldn't quite go that far, Doc. Reason to be suspicious? Absolutely. Reason to automatically flag as a scam? Not necessarily. In this case, it's the content, which is clearly not suitable for a mass mailout, in conjunction with the generic addressing, that elevates this into the "almost-certain scam" category without clicking on anything or checking any links.
    Actually I didn't say this as a blanket statement, forgive me if it came off that way. I stated this in the context of the OP, and to your point about about content. If someone is asking for info, or telling you that you need to click a link to fix your account, or any other such non-sense, and the e-mail doesn't address you by name, DING! DING! DING!. That's the dead giveaway.

    To Gregwh's post, it doesn't take a tech or rocket scientist to recognize the signs of a scam and stop and question something. But scams proliferate because people keep falling for them. Its not just e-mail. The old scam of fixing the roof or sealing the driveway of an elderly person happens every day. Fake magazine sales people "working their way through college" still go door to door. In fact, I think I'm going to open a store that sells magic elixir...
    Chuck

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    Wisewiz (2012-12-13)

  4. #18
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    PayPal..

    I have always been aware of look alike (phishing) emails no matter where they come from. I always type in the link instead of clicking on one. A couple of years ago my PayPal account was comprised. I was taking care of my mother at the time. (89 at the time) I didn't have much time to check on my bank account. Never had a problem with it before. Mom didn't have internet service. A month went by. I did check it out finally. I found two payments were taken out through PayPal. Same amount. $504 each. I checked my emails. Showed two transactions for the same amount. The account names were a bunch of letters and numbers. Both just a little different in sequence. I contacted PayPal and they investigated it. A few weeks later my bank account was credited with the full amount. I called PayPal again asking if this was a common problem with them? Dumb question? Of course it didn't happen often they stated. What did I expect them to say. Oh yeah....we have had comprised accounts way to often?

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    z-rod (2012-12-27)

  6. #19
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Well ship, I stopped using PayPal..
    I still have an account there but don't do any more transactions.
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  7. #20
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    Hi Folks,

    Phishing relies on human engineering. I wrote a post - sort of tongue-in-cheek - in which I blame you, the reader, for spam. Here is a relevant excerpt that explains, in my opinion, exactly why "knowledgeable" folks might fall for these emails:

    Nuke Notifications
    Have we become too dependent on notifications? In a perfect world, notifications come to attention only when we need to take action. They save us time, as we don’t have to keep checking in to multiple websites for status updates. In our imperfect world, the notification is the perfect social engineering vector for a phishing attack. Since we opt-in to receive them, we automatically open notifications because we expect to receive important information. If we have been using a particular notification long enough, we probably don’t even read the incoming notice! We scan over to the link and click through. Spammers know this.


    Banks, ISPs and Web hosts like 1and1.com generally refer to their customers by name, or at least the account number. And, as has been mentioned several times in this thread, they take great pains to point out that they never ask for your password. In my post, I suggested that, as we are now programmed to click first and think later, we can help ourselves by ELIMINATING notifications altogether.

    Ideally, email programs like Gmail would have some kind of authentication from the financial institution's mailserver, obviating the need to examine the FROM: field, which is so easily spoofed.







  8. #21
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    Unfortunately, I think the problem is more the kinds of folks who AREN'T on a forum like this one. Sure, most of the computer savvy folks here are at least less likely to click on suspicious or "too good sounding" links.

    But if I've told my mom once, I've told her a hundred times, "OMG, mom, stop clicking on links in your email!!!!" and even though I've explained why, she still does it because she's new to email and just doesn't remember. And she's way too trusting of the whole "we'll give you item X for free if you just complete this survey". Because who doesn't love free stuff, right?

  9. #22
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Yes Kim, I know a few like that.

    I tell them constantly and they just click away...
    And, this has gone on for years..

    I just gave up...One has to bring her computer to a shop to get cleaned about every month or two..

    She was also running the trial anti virus and that was 4 years old and had not updated because the trial version expired 3 and a half years ago..

    Sometimes you just gotta say ' Who Cares'..
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  10. #23
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    Kim I beleive it has nothing to do with "being tech savvy". It has to do with the whole reason scams work in the first place. Send someone to your mother's door and see if they can con her into giving them her SS# in return for something free. Something tells me there is an even chance she'll do it.
    Chuck

  11. #24
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    polite term for scammers, malware creators, and other undesirables

    Thanks to Medico and others for your comments on this scam.

    A polite term for creators of scams such as these and also malware creators is das Arschloch. This term translates as a--hole and can be used in situations where the English word wouldn't be appropriate.

    It comes in handy when one encounters these low life and also when one encounters the ubiquitous kamakaze drivers who dive in and out of five lanes of traffic on an interstate. Try just saying it -- you'll be amazed how much better you'll feel.

  12. #25
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    I am like most of you where if I receive an email like this, I will go to the website of the bank and login. This is a very good scam, however. I have received legit email notifications like this and of course I don't remember whether they addressed me by name or not since it doesn't happen often enough. It is again a reminder not to click onlinks in email.

  13. #26
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    Is it or is it not a phishing scam?

    I probably learned about 'my way' here on windows secrets.

    First, at least with my e-mail client, right click on the message and select "view message source."

    Second, If you still have any doubt, or just want to know more, copy the message header from the "view message source" info and paste it into a service such as http://www.iptrackeronline.com/email...r-analysis.php

  14. #27
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Interesting.

    I tried it and it gives the source being from Turkey..
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  15. #28
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    Anyone, even the crooks get better with practice.

    What really bothers me is that PayPal, banks, credit card companies, etal. still continually send out emails with links to their web sites. Frequently marketing based. I would conclude their justification to that practice is akin to "the average client demands it". Translation; "The average user is too lazy to find a browser bookmark and access our site via the web." "And it facilitates the sales of our ancillary services."

    I am not anti-business buy any means, but I have to shake my head at the push for online security followed by encouraged procedures that will eventually lead to trouble for the end user.

  16. #29
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Well Chuck, that's how they have always been.

    Don't think for one minute they are doing anything for you that wont add to their profits...

    That's why bank robbers in the old west were so well liked by the people because they were doing to the banks what the average person wanted to do to them..
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  17. #30
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    There was no ad in the email. But why is it surprising that the spoof web site looks like genuine PayPal material? You're amazed that phishing scammers can copy graphics and text?

    Bruce
    The same image and slogan do appear in PayPal ads. And no, I am not surprised in any way by this.
    -- Bob Primak --

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