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  1. #16
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IreneLinda View Post
    Clint et al,

    Thank you all for the tremendous amount of specific helpful information and computer-specific links. I think I'm going to give it a try, but will do LOTS of reading and preparation before beginning.

    2 questions:
    1. should I and, if so, how do I test the new hard drive's condition before installing it to be sure it isn't faulty?
    2. do I need to purchase a "static protection" device of some sort to ensure I don't fry anything inside?
    Again, much appreciation for all your guidance. I'll post back regularly on progress and/or with questions.

    Linda
    1. I never do any testing on a new hard drive; I just set it up. You will know right away if it is bad. But I've never encountered a new drive that was bad. I think your chances of your new drive being bad are pretty low.


    2. This article will tell you about how to protect your computer from static damage: http://www.pcworld.com/article/82184/article.html

    Basically, about all you need is a static protection wrist band: http://www.belkin.com/IWCatProductPa...oduct_Id=41700

  2. #17
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IreneLinda View Post
    P.S. Adding another question based on this post:



    Question #3: Understand Jim's recommendation and reasoning behind it, BUT I would be much more comfortable just backing up old drive and restoring to new - less complicated and much less time consuming, a key consideration right now.

    Is this restore method a bad idea? What do the other Lounge helpers here think?

    Linda
    After I posted my recommendation, I thought about it and figured that if your current Windows install has no problems, there's no reason you couldn't back it up and then restore it onto the new hard drive. That would be a lot easier than a clean install.

    However, Windows gets slower over time, because of debris in the registry, a fragmented hard drive, and other reasons. The clean install method resolves the "slower over time" problem.

  3. #18
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    The "slower over time" syndrome is caused more often than not by the junk accumulated in the startup tree. Keeping that relatively clean via MsConfig, Autoruns, whatsinstartup or the like can keep your system running well for years. I haven't reinstalled Windows 7 since I put it on my desktop the day it was released and it still runs fast. I don't use registry cleaners and Windows 7 handles disk fragmentation automatically.

    The other major cause of system slowdowns is insufficient installed memory. Programs use more and more memory as time goes on.

    Jerry
    Last edited by jwitalka; 2012-12-18 at 18:01.

  4. #19
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    Progress Update

    In case any of my "support group" are following progress and wondering why I haven't tackled "the job" yet:
    • have ordered anti-static wrist band from NewEgg.
    • it'll take a few days to arrive so I'll hold off on opening the PC case.
    • will use wait time to read, study and otherwise "bone up" on all the information and links you've been providing.

    Thanks to Jim for input on testing new drive (relax about it!) and update on restore vs clean install, and also to Jerry for advice on keeping things clean. Will go for the restore method, but be sure to keep my PC as clean as possible going forward to avoid the "slow over time" issue.

    Will post back if any questions come up during my "study break".

    I know I'm repeating myself but I thank you all SO much. This is the best school I've ever attended!!

    Linda

  5. #20
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Guys, watch out. I think Linda will be posting her own suggestions and advice before long!

  6. #21
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    I read the posts in this thread and no one asked Linda if she had an install disc for Windows 7. Hopefully she made one when she bought the computer. This will restore the computer to its original configuration. Then she will have to go through the update process and removing the junk that is invariably installed on new systems by HP.

    I also agree with those that advised her not to use the old drive for backups. If it is going bad, it will almost certainly become unusuable in a short time.

    Nate

  7. #22
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    I'm getting a lot out of this thread, and I have a feeling it'll help me when I need to replace a hard drive.

    More experienced contributors may want to provide Linda a list of tools she'll need.

    Good luck, Linda, with this project.

  8. #23
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nate01pa View Post
    I read the posts in this thread and no one asked Linda if she had an install disc for Windows 7. Hopefully she made one when she bought the computer. This will restore the computer to its original configuration. Then she will have to go through the update process and removing the junk that is invariably installed on new systems by HP.

    I also agree with those that advised her not to use the old drive for backups. If it is going bad, it will almost certainly become unusuable in a short time.

    Nate
    Actually restoring an Image she creates prior to the change will be far less time consuming. You create a system Image with a good 3rd party Imaging app and save it to an Ext HD, burn a rescue Boot Disk from the Imaging app. Install the new HD, pop in the Rescue Disk, attach the Ext HD and Restore the Image. There might be some minor driver issues, but that should be relatively easy to correct.

    With an Image, the system after the restoration looks identical to the OS on the old HD. All the apps and customizations and user settings are included in the Image. No need to restore to factory. Too time consuming.

    When I restore an Image it takes about 10 minutes from the time I pop in the Rescue Disk until I boot the operational restored Image.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  9. #24
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Restoring an image to the new drive should work out fine.
    Use the restore disk you created with your Macrium software and the external drive you have your image on.

    When creating an image in Macrium, I believe the default setting in advance properties is for "intelligent sector copying", not "exact sector copying".
    The later is mainly used for drive forensics.
    The former will omit the page & hibernation files and other "designated empty sectors" thereby allowing for faster restore jobs and better compatibility for restoring to differing sizes of hard drives.
    Macrium01.jpg
    This will be the default setting in MR


    Do not format the drive from another computer prior to reimage or clean install, like some people do.
    Just install the drive, remove the old one, with the computer powered off of course, and then power back on and boot with the
    rescue disk and the external drive plugged in.
    *Ensure that your BIOS is set to boot from CD/DVD and USB, preferably without any user interaction (keyboard boot menu choices).

    In the off chance that the image is unsuccessful, a clean install can easily be done.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

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  11. #25
    Lounger JCitizen's Avatar
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    I like you post on Macrium Clint! I've never had a problem with it; this may also be the only way to get the "FACTORY RESTORE" Partition onto the new drive; although I don't know if you could actually use it if you don't have a burned set of original restore disks. One would need to burn them before doing this if not already. HP's recovery disc sets that I've burned as soon as I purchase a PC, are able to find "lost" factory restore partitions. I prefer them to the DVD sets, because they are original, and guaranteed uncorrupted (or at least more likely), and faster in the restore process. But disk #1 of the set can always find the partition, and offer to restore using it.

    I think HP had this system developed by Symantec; and it has always worked swimmingly for me and my clients.

  12. #26
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    HP's recovery disc sets that I've burned as soon as I purchase a PC, are able to find "lost" factory restore partitions
    They don't find anything, the discs usually are the data contained on the factory restore partition, it has to be that way because there is no way of knowing the condition of the hard drive or even if its the same hard drive. Disc #1 has the info about how the drive was partitioned, recreates the structure, puts the factory restore data in its partition and then usually recovers the system install from that partition. So step by step it builds itself back up to what it was originally.

    You're right that you couldn't mix the two processes, they are each designed to be independent options with somewhat different objectives most of the time.

  13. #27
    Lounger JCitizen's Avatar
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    Sorry F.U.N. but I'm confused by your statement. Let me clarify my position. When I tried to restore my PC, the SATA connections had been reversed by mistake. Even returning them to original position did not help. So I got out Disk #1 of my recovery set, that I burned when it was brand new, and this disk almost immediately asked if I wan't to use the hard drive recovery partition, or if I wanted to use the disk set. I selected the hard drive, and the recovery program never once again read from the optical storage. It did the whole recovery from the hard drive. I still can't get it to read this partition using the F key combo that is supposed to wake this up - so I have to assume I've damaged that relationship with my cable bungling. I completely refute that it did the restore from the disk set, I have eyes and ears that can hear and see when the optical drive is running, and in fact had removed disk #1 from the tray whilst the process ran. I can't be mistaken about that part of the operation.

    I've since then found this to be true with other friends whose recovery plans when awry.
    Last edited by JCitizen; 2013-01-03 at 22:50. Reason: typos

  14. #28
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    Oh yes, I forgot to include that part, sorry, if the disk structure is recognized then it does not need to be created. Its like when you read instructions and if A says if such and such is already done then skip to step D. I'm so used to performing clean recoveries to new or other disks, I skipped to step D by default. I reversed the analogy but you should still know what I mean.

  15. #29
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    Sluggish Progress Update

    Wanted to post a quick status update here because getting my hard disk task done has been delayed and I don't want my Lounge lifeline to give up on me! Let's just say life got in the way, but is now back under control. This is day one of getting myself back into this, reading all instructions and links first; then, cleaning out and backing up before tackling the install.

    One quick question an earlier post made me think of: anti static strap is ready; do I need any other tools besides those found in a regular "house not tech" tool box? Or will I get an answer to this once I review Clint's HP specs and instructions?

    Thanks,

    Linda

  16. #30
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    A smallish star screwdriver maybe, but not likely any more than that.
    And don't forget to clip the wrist band antistatic device to the metal frame of the case once you start.
    You must turn off the power supply unit's power switch, but you needn't unplug it.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

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