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  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
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    If I delete these registry keys . . .

    Years and years ago, when I got my first digital camera, I installed Kodak EasyShare. Now that I haven't used it for a long time and want to uninstall it, I did a little investigation online and found that it is a real bear to uninstall, i.e. the uninstall that comes with the software does not work at all. You have to go through a lengthy procedure and remove something like 60 registry keys. The instructions are very detailed, and I feel pretty confident I can follow them correctly. I also have a couple of image backups of my system. My question is, however, if something goes wrong in the registry, would I necessarily know it right away, or could it be something that could crop up on some rarely used application of months from now after I have overwritten my system backups?

    Thanks,
    Ellen

  2. #2
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    That really would depend on the "severity" of the mistake. A serious one could render the system unusable, a less serious one would probably have more contained effects.
    Before removing anything you can (and should, IMO), create a system restore point, which can prevent the need to restore a whole image, if things go bad. You can also export each of the keys to delete, before deleting them and add the .reg files in a specific folder. You can simply click over them again, in case you need to restore any of the keys, without affecting anything else. These .reg files take almost no space, so you can keep them indefinitely.

    Of course, these are just precautionary measures, but it's better to err on the side of caution.

  3. #3
    2 Star Lounger
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    I can create a system restore point, but haven't I read a few times that the system restore is not 100% reliable?

    As far as exporting the keys, the procedure they have you follow involves downloading a "Windows Installer Cleanup Utility" that involves deleting the keys from the cleanup window, which doesn't allow for exporting. I'm not sure why they recommend that.

    I should mention here that I have ERUNT (registry backup) installed and running on my computer, although I've never bothered to learn how to use it to restore the registry, since I can just use the full image backup in the event of a registry problem.

  4. #4
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    Well, creating the restore point won't hurt, will it? If it is created it can be used and you will have an additional, easier to use, safeguard.

  5. #5
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    You might want to give the free version of REVO uninstaller a shot; after the normal uninstall it can be used to search the registry and program files for related orphaned entries. Then you could compare what it finds with the list of entries left behind that you have, and if they match up, let REVO get rid of them and if there's a few missing, leave them, won't do a bit of harm that way and the computer's performance is totally unaffected.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    My question is, however, if something goes wrong in the registry, would I necessarily know it right away, or could it be something that could crop up on some rarely used application of months from now after I have overwritten my system backups?
    Yes albeit rare, you may experience anything from not being able to boot, to seemingly unrelated issues cropping up later on.

    I would not assume that the software is difficult to uninstall based solely on researching others' problems with it.
    Use the uninstaller applet in your control panel as a first means of removal. If you are worried about it, I would create a current image of the disk as a safety measure.

    Going through the registry to remove entries is a very last resort when it comes to the removal of any software.
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  7. #7
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    I would do a complete backup of the system, and I would then use an uninstaller program to do the uninstall, rather than trying to manually delete registry keys. You can use CCleaner to uninstall programs. That's what I use, but in all honesty, I haven't tried any other programs, so I can't compare it to anything else.

  8. #8
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    The "Revo Uninstaller" previously mentioned is the most thorough and safest uninstaller on the market. I rely on it so much that I BOUGHT the program. It's invaluable!*

    * Many programs will UN-Install via the Windows Installer, but there can be hundreds of entries left behind in the registry. Only an Un-Installer like Revo, will go into the registry and find only the entries left behind by that one program and delete them, while leaving the rest of the registry alone. I've never known it to harm the registry or cripple Windows.

    I personally use it and find that many other tech's use it too.

    However, when you're doing something that involves your hard drive and registry, it's always a good idea to just back up your C drive before you start.

    Since 1997 I've been using "Ghost" to back up my own hard drive. Just yesterday I had to restore a Ghost Image to recover from some really weird Glitch in my Windows XP, that was causing BSOD's.
    It's always better to be SAFE, than SORRY.

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    Last edited by DrWho; 2013-01-16 at 13:56.
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

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