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  1. #1
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    Adding TV to network

    Last week I bought a smart TV and the appropriate wireless LAN adaptor, so that the family could watch catch-up TV programmes on the television screen rather than clustered round the PC, but have been unable to connect to the internet.

    The TV recognises my network, but asks for the encryption key. I’ve no idea why anyone would want to encrypt a TV programme.

    After asking Panasonic why the key was not included in the manual, I was told that it would be on the bottom of my router, and would consist of 8, 10 or 12 characters. There is a 'Security Pin ' of 8 numerals and a alphanumeric 'MAC' of 12 characters, but neither enables the TV to make a connection.

    The only idea that occurs to me now is to remove my home network entirely and create a new one, in the hope it might work. However, I'm reluctant to try that unless it is likely to be the solution, in view of the difficulty I encountered setting up the network originally.

    Hopefully someone here knows whether setting up a new network is likely to work, or whether there is some simpler solution.

    Main PC uses XP SP3, that of my wife and the laptop have Vista, although the latter has to be connected by ethernet cable ever since her hard drive needed reformatting.

    TIA

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  3. #2
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    The encryption key is the key used in your wireless network, indeed. You can probably access it's value from the router configuration page, though you may need to change a setting to see it in a visible, clear way. What is the brand and model of your router?

  4. #3
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    Hi ruirib,
    The router is a Netgear N300 Wireless ADSL2+ Modem router, also known as DGN2200.

    I've had another look through the settings this morning, can find nothing useful, other than what I tried previously, namely below the selected WPA2-PSK (AES) encryption -which is recognised by the TV - there is a passphrase, which may be what Panasonic call the key.

    Unfortunately, this phrase or key consists of 19 characters, occupying the entire space allocated, giving the impression that there are more, but attempting to scroll further wipes out the entire entry, although clicking 'Cancel' brings it back. Anyway, the visible characters on their own do not enable a connection between TV and router.

    It has occurred to me today that I could apply a new password, which might do the trick, but at the risk of my wife losing access to the web, as has already happened with the laptop.

    The following appears beside the encryption settings, which might explain the problem, although one must assume that a new TV would have WAP2 enabled.

    Security Encryption (WPA2-PSK)

    WPA2 is a newer version of WPA. Only select this if all the wireless clients in your network support WPA2. If selected, you must use AES encryption, and enter the WPA passphrase (Network key). Enter a word or group of printable characters in the Passphrase box. The Passphrase must be 8 to 63 characters or 64 hex digits in length.
    Last edited by georgelee; 2013-01-11 at 06:14. Reason: removed repeated word

  5. #4
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    Yes, the passphrase is what they call encryption key. You can, indeed, specify a new one. Just make sure it is rather long and mix caps and lowercase and numbers.

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  7. #5
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    In a residential area, an 8 character passphrase with just alphas and numbers should be sufficient. The likelihood of some trying to bust a WPA PS2 key is extremely remote.

    Jerry

  8. #6
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    Thanks for the advice, ruirib, far more useful than anything from Panasonic.

    I used a 16 character password, a mixture of upper and lower case letters and numbers. Hopefully that is long enough.

    Connection to the BBC iPlayer involved just a click on the ensuing screen, I chose one of the featured programmes and it started fairly quickly, then it was necessary to log off, as the wife wanted to watch her favourite quiz show.

    Now it only remains to discover how one selects the particular programme from the last 7 days she wishes to see, or the players for the other major channels. It’s probably necessary to do that via the PC, which is where I’ll start.

    Sorting out the network wasn’t too bad. When I went on line on my PC there was a delay of a minute or two, but then it worked normally – but the router sits on the desk just behind the PC and is connected by cable, so probably doesn'r need a password.

    My wife lost her connection as soon as I changed the password, but it is sorted now, using the ISPs automatic problem solver. After various tests it said the problem appeared to be the network password and led me to a page where I could enter the new one, then everything was as normal.

    This knowledge may even enable me to get the laptop working wirelessy again.

    Many, many thanks for your help, just when I was beginning to think that buying the LAN adaptor had been a waste of money. Once again the Lounge shows how invaluable it is.

    George
    Last edited by georgelee; 2013-01-11 at 13:47.

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    In a residential area, an 8 character passphrase with just alphas and numbers should be sufficient. The likelihood of some trying to bust a WPA PS2 key is extremely remote.

    Jerry
    Thanks Jerry, but I only saw your posting when replying to ruirib.

  10. #8
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    Hi George,

    I am glad your problem is now solved. 16 chars is ok. Jerry's suggestion is not at all unreasonable, even if in terms of security, the longer the password, the better. Using WPA2 even with 8 chars and the suggestions made by Jerry relative to the password's content, things would be ok.

    Do let us know if you have issues with the laptop.

    Regards

    Rui

  11. #9
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Just remember to keep a copy of the password around. Sooner or later you'll want to connect something else and you'll have to start all over if you forget it. Hopefully you have also changed the router login password to something other than the default one. Don't lose that one either although there is a router reset button that will return it back to default (along with all other router settings) if you do lose it.

    Jerry

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  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    Just remember to keep a copy of the password around. Sooner or later you'll want to connect something else and you'll have to start all over if you forget it. Hopefully you have also changed the router login password to something other than the default one. Don't lose that one either although there is a router reset button that will return it back to default (along with all other router settings) if you do lose it.

    Jerry
    Thanks for the reminder, although it seems to be well covered. I've stored it in the secure notes section of LastPast, in Clipboard Magic Lite and my diary. Also it's still on the notepad where I wrote it down to enter on the TV - which proved useful as my wife was unable to access email this morning until I entered it again. Hope that will not become a daily event.

    George

  14. #11
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    UPDATE
    As feared, things have started to go wrong with the network.

    My wife couldn’t get online this morning until I entered the new encryption code for the router. But the major problem is the laptop.

    It was in use for several hours yesterday while I installed the patches and updates, defragged, then scanned with Malwarebytes, Superantispyware and MSE. After that I tried to get it to connect via wireless, without success. There was a security password represented by 8 asterisks – presumably the security pin from the router – but every time I entered the new code they reverted to the previous 8 characters.

    I tried changing various settings – all of which are unintelligible to me – without getting a connection, then gave up. Normally it would not be touched again for two weeks, but this evening I decided to make another attempt to see if Windows 8 would install before the price rises.

    I tried to install the preview version last autumn, but the ISO would not work. I think it was Ted who pointed out that W8 had higher security standards, and would not install without certain features, at which point I gave up. This evening I visited the MS website to check the requirements, and noticed MS can test one’s system to see if it is suitable. Obviously XP would not work, it needed to be done on the laptop. That’s when I discovered it no longer works even by Ethernet cable.

    Originally the machines were named George, wife and wife’s laptop, and the network George123. When my wife’s PC needed to be reformatted I had difficulty reestablishing the network, and somehow it ended up as wife’s laptop network, and the laptop would only connect by cable to the router.

    Today it is ‘Unknown Network’ and trying to connect produces a message ‘ The settings of this PC are not compatible with those of the network’ Unfortunately it is not possible to compare the two, as XP shows almost no information.

    After all this background, my questions:
    1) Presumably I need to set up a new network, but does this necessitate removing
    the existing one first? If yes, and I fail to establish a working network, my life will
    be hell.

    2) Does the network need to be set up on this XP machine, which sits next to the router
    and is connected directly, or could it be established wirelessly on my wife’s PC ,
    which hopefully would be simpler. I’m really put off by the XP instructions that
    start with ‘Install the network cards, modems and cables’ – not very explicit.

    Sorry this has been so long-winded, but the background may well be necessary to form an opinion.

    George
    Last edited by georgelee; 2013-01-13 at 18:18. Reason: clarity

  15. #12
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    The wired network does not depend on the encryption key. I suggest you plug the cable, restart the computer and see how it behaves. That's all that's needed, nothing else.

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