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  1. #1
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    User account housekeeping

    I made the mistake of setting up a new computer using only one account -- the Original (administrator) account. I have now set up several users and given one of them administrator privileges. I will call this the 'New-Admin' account.

    Is it safe/wise now to log on to the New-Admin, and downgrade the privileges of the Original (administrator) account to that of a user? In this way I can keep all the customisation, and have the safety of using a non-admin account, while still having access to admin via another account.

    I am not very familiar with user accounts, which is why I am checking before I do this step. I also see that under Win7 microsoft will not allow me to simply copy a user, so I have not tried.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Hi ILowe,
    It is recommended that each pc have only one Admin account. It is also recommended that the Admin account owner creates a second account for her / his self and use it for normal pc usage. Personally, I find this makes sitting down uncomfortable (PITA).
    Don't attempt changing the 'New-Admin' account as it could cause problems, just delete all of it & set it up again as a 'Standard' account.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  3. #3
    2 Star Lounger
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    ILowe,

    You only need 1 administrator account. You can keep your new administrator account and assign the 1st account standard user permissions. I have done this several times over the years. This way you can keep all of your customizations.

    Another option is to activate the default hidden administrator account through a command prompt.

    Rich

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    ILowe (2013-02-01)

  5. #4
    4 Star Lounger
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    I have only 1 administrator account. Do I need any other account as well as at this time I am the only user of the PC?

    Dave

  6. #5
    2 Star Lounger
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    One administrator account is all you need. Many people prefer to set up a separate standard user account for day to day activities as they feel there is less chance of unsavory characters gaining access to the machine. It's up to you and your comfort level with the safeguards you employ.

    Rich

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to rlfvt For This Useful Post:

    DaveBRenn (2013-01-31),ILowe (2013-02-01)

  8. #6
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    Thanks Rich. That is what I thought but since this is new territory for me, I appreciate your confirmation. Thanks to all of your for your replies

    Ilowe

  9. #7
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    There are occasions when you will need for an account to have administrator rights, and then log in as that user, in order for a program to install correctly for that user. Most of the time, however, this is not necessary, because you can run the install program as administrator.

    Therefore, keep an administrator account handy in case you need it. If a program won't install correctly in your normal acct, log in as the administrator and then give administrative rights to the normal user account. Then log in as that user and install the program. You can then change that account back to limited rights while logged in as that user.

    Interestingly, if I have administrative rights, I can log in as myself and remove those rights. But once I do, I don't have the ability to get them back if I'm logged in as that user.

  10. #8
    2 Star Lounger
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    When I am in a standard account and right click to choose run as administrator a box pops up and asks for the administrator password. So far I have never had an occasion where I've had to switch accounts.

    Rich

  11. #9
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    There have been a few times in my life, in the 2000/XP era, when you had to be logged in as the user in question in order to get a program to install correctly, and you had to have administrative rights. I have done helpdesk, not desktop support, since the advent of Vista/7/8, and so I haven't had the opportunity to see if that would ever happen again. Likely Microsoft fixed that problem by letting you run a program as administrator, and by getting all of the bugs ironed out of that process.

  12. #10
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Some of the tinkering I do requires being logged in as a member of the Administrators group, but I run routinely as a standard user.

    FWIW, one can setup a new PC or new installation on an old PC as a member of the Administrators group, and get all the settings and apps lined up to suit. Then create another account and give it Administrators group privileges. Logon that account, then demote the original account that has all the settings personalized to a standard user account.

    That leaves the PC with one active account in the Administrators group, and a personalized user account. In fact, I've been doing just that with a Windows 8 Pro Upgrade. I've just finished by setting up a sparse account in the Administrators group, and demoting the account I used for setup to a standard user account.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  13. #11
    2 Star Lounger
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    That's what I tried to say in post #3 in response to the OP's original question. Thought it was understood.

    Rich

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