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  1. #1
    Uranium Lounger CWBillow's Avatar
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    Office 2010 v. Office 2013

    I have to admit, I like new toys, and as toys go, computers and all the attached software and the upgrades rank right up there with the best of them for ongoing entertainment. But I think I am about to max out.

    I have been reading about office 2013, and if MS thinks I will pay $100+ per year for software that may or may not change adequately enough to justify the charge...well...they must know me better than me.

    Yes, I like new toys, and love the thrill of new software. But I do not think that I do enough to keep on paying for the same item repeatedly.

    Regards,
    Chuck Billow
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    "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience - well, that comes from poor judgment."

    ~ A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956)- "House at Pooh Corner"

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    The annual subscription version of Office 365 is definitely geared toward a certain market. Plus this license is for up to 5 PCs, which means the cost is $20 each PC per year compared to Office 2013 Pro which is $399.99 per license. If a small office needs Office, but does not wish to purchase 5 full licenses, this does make sense to amortize the cost of Office over time for their PCs. Using Office 365 for that 5 PC office would cost $100 per year whereas buying 5 licenses to the equivalent stand alone version would cost $2000 up front. It would take roughly 20 years for that office to recoup it's initial cost. For that office, the subscription is very cost effective.
    Last edited by Medico; 2013-02-18 at 05:29.
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  3. #3
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    One thing to remember is that Microsoft has changed the licensing terms for the non-subscription Office 2013 SKUs. Each Office 2013 SKU is for ONE PC only and is tied to the ONE PC for the life of the PC. No more using Office on two PCs legally. If you get a new PC or another PC you must purchase another Office license the one you have is not transferable. This is changing the retail Office license to be more like the OEM license.

    Joe

  4. #4
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    If a small office needs Office, but does not wish to purchase 5 full licenses, this does make sense to amortize the cost of Office over time for their PCs. Using Office 365 for that 5 PC office would cost $100 per year whereas buying 5 licenses to the equivalent stand alone version would cost $2000 up front. It would take roughly 20 years for that office to recoup it's initial cost. For that office, the subscription is very cost effective.
    Office 365 home is not licensed for business use. Office 365 Business is $20/mo ($240/yr)

    Jerry

  5. #5
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Fair enough, I was looking at the home pricing. In a situation where a home user has several PCs they wish to have Office on, the annual subscription of $100 for 5 PCs is much less than the cost of individual licenses for each PC. It would take 4 years of this 5 license subscription to equal the cost of a single traditional installation.
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  6. #6
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    But I think the only reason that multiple copies of Office reside in a home environment is only if it came free as in the past. Its too expensive in most cases when you have to purchase a separate license for each PC. So I feel the best comparison is against the cost of a single PC license vs Office 365 rental.

    Jerry

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    In my opinion there should be more flexibility, license wise, for Office 365. For a single user that needs a single license, the rental cost is clearly excessive. There should probably be an entry offer, maybe with Office use on 2 computers and costing probably $49 or so.

    I also do not understand this extreme with the regular retail license being used on a single PC. Yes, they want to sell rentals, but they will alienate not a few users and may give open source alternatives some traction.

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    The subscription cost is only clearly excessive if you have bought a license in the past and never upgrade Office. OTOH, if you upgrade Office the subscription price is not excessive. You are getting a license for Office Pro Plus not just Home & Student. I fully realize that as with Windows most people only upgrade Office with a new PC.

    BTW, the "new" license terms are the same as the Office 2010 license terms if you purchase an Office 2010 key card.

    Joe

  10. #9
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I guess the whole point is that the OP was discussing his use of Office 2013 versus Office 365 for his personal home use, and for this specific use it appears the OP would take 3 to 4 years to recoup his initial investment compared to the Office 365 edition, which would work on up to 5 PCs. I know of many households with 3 or 4 PCs. In my house we have 2 laptops with Office Pro installed (my wife works for a local university and was able to get these at great discounts).

    In looking at the Office 365 Home Editions, the $100 offer appears to be what used to be the Pro Edition, or very similar.

    Also I would think a home based small business with up to 5 PCs could use this version without problems. In this case, it would seem to be considerably less expensive.
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  11. #10
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    I know of many households with 3 or 4 PCs. In my house we have 2 laptops with Office Pro installed (my wife works for a local university and was able to get these at great discounts).
    But would you have paid for both copies if you had to buy each copy at full price? Some people would but I suspect most families wouldn't. that's why I claim the benchmark should be the cost of one copy vs subscription. Home and student (no Outlook) goes for $139. Break even is less than a year and a half. Home and Business is $220. Break even is about 2 years.

    lso I would think a home based small business with up to 5 PCs could use this version without problems
    Will it work - yes. Is it legal - no, it's a business use. That said, I have lawyer clients that that use Home versions of Office illegally in their Office.

    Jerry

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    New Lounger
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    For what it's worth, I think the new licensing will (after it's caught a lot of people out) drive up use of open alternatives. My wife uses Open Office for her needs and it works perfectly well. OK, it probably doesn't do some things MS Office can do (VBA being on of them I suppose) but she doesn't need the bells and whistles and probably isn't even aware they exist.

    And I'm not sure how forgiving home users will turn out to be if they discover the cost of their new PC needs more dollars added in for Office (although I accept that the subscription pricing model might overcome that).

  13. #12
    New Lounger
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    Easy to tell I am reading mostly mail from younger folks. Picture having a PC and a laptop for years with Office Pro from your employer. You retire and Outlook is your email client ongoing. You keep up to date and just bought the latest Office Pro 2010. Now if I want to carry on I pay $99 per year or $249 times 2 for $498. On a set retirement income and nearly 75 years old what choice would you make. The only one that makes sense is migrate to something similar and give up Outlook. After I have no idea how many years (20 at least) Maybe give up Office in any format. I am going through the process now with Thunderbird.
    Looked at Win 7 Live A Mail and the new online Outlook but Live mail has no provision for putting contacts in separate folders (Family ones - old business ones, etc.) and Outlook online is just that and no thanks.
    I like MS generally but one starts to see that this kind of rip off sends folks away.

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  15. #13
    New Lounger
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    Had to add to the above - it is really even worse as I head a small charity here and use Publisher for so much of the posters and signs. If I went with the Pro version to get Publisher I would be looking at over $1000. Fortunately my "old" copy of Publisher works fine in Win 7 and 8.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinecure99 View Post
    Easy to tell I am reading mostly mail from younger folks. Picture having a PC and a laptop for years with Office Pro from your employer. You retire and Outlook is your email client ongoing. You keep up to date and just bought the latest Office Pro 2010. Now if I want to carry on I pay $99 per year or $249 times 2 for $498. On a set retirement income and nearly 75 years old what choice would you make. The only one that makes sense is migrate to something similar and give up Outlook. After I have no idea how many years (20 at least) Maybe give up Office in any format. I am going through the process now with Thunderbird.
    Looked at Win 7 Live A Mail and the new online Outlook but Live mail has no provision for putting contacts in separate folders (Family ones - old business ones, etc.) and Outlook online is just that and no thanks.
    I like MS generally but one starts to see that this kind of rip off sends folks away.
    You can keep using Outlook 2010 for quite a few years. There are members happily running Office 2003, still, and even previous versions.

    From my own experience using Office 2013, unless you use the cloud intensively, there are no game changing features in Office 2013. You will be fine with 2010.

  17. #15
    Uranium Lounger CWBillow's Avatar
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    That pretty much answers it for me as well. I'd been toying with the idea of changing over...not any more though.

    Thanks,
    Chuck
    -------------------------------------------------
    "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience - well, that comes from poor judgment."

    ~ A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956)- "House at Pooh Corner"

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