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  1. #1
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    Liquid cooling versus heat pipes

    From what I can see the biggest advantage of liquid cooling is that the heat is not dissipate in the case but expelled so all the components will run cooler not just the CPU. That being the case a liquid cooler that is not as effective cooling the CPU alone will bring bigger over all benefits. Is my thinking correct?

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    No, not exactly.

    Liquids have a much higher propensity for heat absorption than any metals do.
    It will also depend on one's setup and what, specifically, it's used for.

    Liquid cooling on my system, run at stock speed, works beautifully. I couldn't be more impressed with the model I've got.

    Check out reviews for both heatsinks and liquid CPU coolers on this site.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2013-03-01 at 11:41.
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    Liquid cooling is used because you can pump the coolant through the system, therefore speeding up the heat transfer. That's why the internal combustion engine is almost always liquid cooled.

    cheers, Paul

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    I'll bet you get less dust in your system with liquid cooling than you do with air cooling. That factor alone would be a huge benefit over time, especially if liquid cooling were available with laptops, which are much more difficult to get the dust out of than are desktops.

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    OK all things being equal with a traditional CPU cooler the heat is moved from the CPU to the air in the case which has to increase the overall temperature inside the case. With a water cooled your discharging the air outside of the case so the internal case temperature will be cooler. Both of those assumption are correct. Correct? That being said you need to add case fans to remove this heat outside of the case. So the water cooled system should, with or without case fans, have an overall lower internal temperature along with a cooler running CPU.

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Closed unit CPU cooling systems are becoming more popular these days as they are extremely easy to install and maintain.
    The price tag is still a bit high but it's been coming down as more and more models hit the market.
    Having said that, it's still wise to keep one's stock heatsink and fan in storage as a backup in the event of a failure.

    I've had mine (closed unit liquid CPU cooler) for a little over a year now and I haven't noticed any degradation in it's ability to keep
    my X990 well cooled under load. If your thinking about closed unit liquid coolers for the CPU, I recommend the "push/pull" method on the radiator fans.
    Two fans in this config are far more efficient than one single fan alone.


    P1010429.JPG
    As you can see, it fits nicely in the back of the case

    For equivalent cooling, you'll need quite a hefty hunk of copper to keep up. Not just some stock CPU cooler either, I'm talking
    3rd party heavy duty models made for overclockers.
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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Check Marc View Post
    OK all things being equal with a traditional CPU cooler the heat is moved from the CPU to the air in the case which has to increase the overall temperature inside the case. With a water cooled your discharging the air outside of the case so the internal case temperature will be cooler. Both of those assumption are correct. Correct? That being said you need to add case fans to remove this heat outside of the case. So the water cooled system should, with or without case fans, have an overall lower internal temperature along with a cooler running CPU.
    Yeah, you'll get that benefit from the CPU, but not necessarily from the area immediately surrounding the CPU
    where the voltages are being phased, (depending upon some boards), that can in itself generate decent amounts of heat.
    Heat coming off the board will vary too between chipsets and various makes and models of motherboards.

    It's best to have more of a well thought out plan for overall area cooling when undertaking a build, as the CPU isn't the only area on the board that generates heat.
    It's also important that your GPU is well ventilated otherwise you'll end up having much of that heat in the area cancelling out any potential benefits.

    You can think about liquid cooling as very specialized "spot" cooling systems for specific components.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2013-02-25 at 13:37.
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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    As I understand it, Clint, a liquid cooled system has the liquid cooler in addition to the fans. So you are still going to get dust in the system. It's just that your CPU would run cooler due to the liquid cooler being mounted on it in place of the traditional heat sync.

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Yep, your still gonna get dust wherever you have any system that moves air.
    You'll still have to, every now and then, disassemble the rad fans and clean everything up, just like you would a copper or aluminum heatsink.
    Except with most heatsinks, you can put them in the dishwasher. You can't do that with a closed system radiator.
    DRIVE IMAGING
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  10. #10
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    The dishwasher! I would never have thought of that.

    For what it's worth, the heatsink will get lots of heat in the dishwasher. (You can store that with other meaningless info!)

  11. #11
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    I bought some bulk foam filter material at Home Depot. I cut it to size and covered ll the large openings on my computer. The dust has gone down significantly. All my fans draw air into the case so all the other smaller openings are pressurized in essence.

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    How's the temperature doing for the various components since you installed the filter material?

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    It's fine. The power supply inlet, the back case fan and the the side covers opening are all covered. With all the fans drawing in through the filters the case stays cool.

  14. #14
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    When you say that the openings are covered, I understand you to mean that they are covered with filtering material which allows air to pass through.

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    5 Star Lounger Lugh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    I understand you to mean that they are covered with filtering material which allows air to pass through.
    Yes, that's almost definitely what he means. I did this once years ago using patches cut from ladies' tights or stockings, and it reduced the dust.

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