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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    Confused about image restore in Win8 64bit

    I use Acronis True Image 2013 as my imaging software and have just imaged with the built in Windows image facility. I don't like having a reserved partition but the complications of incorporating it back into the C: partition are daunting, so I shall have to learn to live with it. My C: drive is an 250gb SSD and my D: drive is a Seagate Barracuda 2TB. I also image to an external USB 3.0 2TB drive.

    It's frustrating that all the drives get renamed during a restore. My question is: When I restore an image should I restore the reserved partition as well? My last restore with True Image I only restored the C: drive and it worked fine but I would really like someone with more knowledge than I (not difficult) to explain when/if to restore the reserved partition.

    It appears to me that restoring to a different drive/disk than the one the image was made from is fraught with problems, unless it is just my ignorance. If there was a complete HDD collapse and a new HDD installed surely the reserved partition would contain erroneous information, I suppose if the current HDD became corrupted but was physically OK then a restore of the reserved partition would be necessary. This is a very important question as data loss and two days of work are involved.

    Thank you

    Peter

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    If your have and are using Acronis TI, why do you need to bother with Windows backup and restore?

    How many partitions do you have?
    If you have [hidden?] EUFI BIOS then Windows 8 will likely have two extra partitions along with the "C" drive the OS is installed on.
    It's also possible that some of your bootfiles are located on the other partition.
    Depending upon your make and model of computer you might have a EUFI, factory restore, and the usual 100-200MB partition that
    Windows 8 usually reserves for bitlocker. So look through your documentation to verify what you have.

    It's frustrating that all the drives get renamed during a restore. My question is: When I restore an image should I restore the reserved partition as well?
    Yes definitely image the extra partition(s). This should help prevent your drives from being renamed upon image restoration.

    You've got a 2TB drive, which means that much of your personal data can be located to it, instead of residing with the operating system
    and increasing the amount of "stuff" you'll end up having to image.
    Think of drive imaging as a way to get your OS up and running quickly in the event of a failure. Your data should also be backed up independently.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2013-02-26 at 22:29.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I would never use the Windows built in Imaging app when I have Acronis True Image 2013 (I do). Acronis works very well. Be sure to create the Rescue Boot Media for Acronis. This is used to accomplish the Restoration.

    With Acronis, even if you include ALL partitions or drives (with the exception of the Ext HD) in your Image file, when you restore, you can choose to restore any one partition or all partitions. You have the choice.

    For example in my setup I have 2 partitions. The C Drive holds my OS and apps. My D Drive holds all my data. When I include both partitions in an Image file, the Image file is obviously larger. When I choose to restore, I can choose either partition or both partitions to restore to. The S/W places the info in the correct partition. Generally when I restore I just have to restore the OS/app partition as my data partition does not get screwed up.
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  4. #4
    4 Star Lounger
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    Disk/Partition Names

    Giving disks/partitions unique names helps in the restore process. See attached example.
    Disk Names.PNG

    Rich

  5. #5
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    Windows 8 actually doesn't have a built-in image backup utility. The image backup utility in Windows 7 was deprecated in Windows 8, although you can still restore an image made in Windows 7. I don't know for a fact why Microsoft did this; possibly because almost any third-party image software is more flexible and has more features.

    Windows 8 does have "Refresh my PC" which includes the recimg tool that can be used to create an image of your system. But this is clearly not intended to be a full-out image application. Also, buried deep in the advanced recovery options there is a "System Image Recovery" utility but, again, this is not intended to be an image application. It's really for the use of business that want to roll out a custom image to their workstations.

    You are best off using a third-party image application. Stick with Acronis if you like. I myself gave up on it long ago and I now use Macrium Reflect.

    Windows 8 includes many worthwhile advanced recovery tools that are stored in a special partition usually called Recovery. Don't mess with this partition. In the first place, it occupies little space. And if you mess with it, you risk corrupting Windows 8's built in recovery tools.

    However, the best reason not to mess with this partition is that your computer boots to this partition first. Then, if your computer started properly, the UEFI hands off to the C partition. If you mess with this partition your computer may not boot.

    You should make an image of this partition once - as a backup in case it becomes corrupted - but there's no need to do it again.

    As others have said, it's a wise idea to give labels to partitions that do not have them. Drive letters are only placeholders and they will often change when you boot your computer from a disc or UFD. But labels don't change.

  6. #6
    3 Star Lounger
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    If you go into your account at Acronis you can simply download an ISO of the boot disk also.
    Joe

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lounge Ranger View Post
    Windows 8 actually doesn't have a built-in image backup utility. The image backup utility in Windows 7 was deprecated in Windows 8, although you can still restore an image made in Windows 7. I don't know for a fact why Microsoft did this; possibly because almost any third-party image software is more flexible and has more features.
    Windows 8 has a perfectly functional "Create a system image" item within Control Panel: How do you create a system image in Windows 8


    Quote Originally Posted by Lounge Ranger View Post
    Also, buried deep in the advanced recovery options there is a "System Image Recovery" utility but, again, this is not intended to be an image application. It's really for the use of business that want to roll out a custom image to their workstations.
    I don't think it would be called Recovery if it was intended for initial rollouts.


    Bruce
    Last edited by BruceR; 2013-02-28 at 19:16.

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