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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Exclamation Win 7 Ultimate-without SP1 and no backup disk

    Hello

    Help me with the following problem before losing 410GB+ of vital information on HDD.

    Scenario

    Since the clean install in the late fall of 2009 my friend did a clean install of OS Windows 7 Ultimate (built 7600) on the fresh new hard disk drive thatís on myPC today.
    After some time that ISO copy had to be validated with remove WAT to initiate the process of activating the OS and hopefully passing it through M$ and making it genuine...Oops; kb 971033 really gave me immense problems as the black screen of doom and the annoying This Windows is not genuine message in the right hand corner of the screen is ominously present there today.

    In the System image (Computer>Properties> Control Panel>System and Securities>System) the icon of a boring (yawn) grayish Apple is present for the 64 bit version of Win 7 Ultimate including Product ID locked Ė by mistake to Apple.This key isnít possible to either change or reactivate as it isnít recognized by apple.com nor by M$ and (not that I must have the original Windows Defender or Windows Firewall working, but the updates that M$ launches do in fact keep my PC quite at top notch working very fast) although the installed software prior to the now actively running 64 bit version was the 32 bit alternative, it seems only logical to have it running at those speeds again; not overclocked for gaming.

    I donít want to lose any of the files from Outlook 2007 Enterprise (registered in my name), business contacts, VIP files, Skype (sorry for advertising), Printers, Webcam, CAD Blueprints, family albums with pictures and videos, Ö .

    Therefore, prior to starting the endeavor of totally wiping off the whole 500GB of information on the HDD, Iím being very cautious to not do an irreversibly stupid act of no return once started with unpacking the new copy of the ISO Windows 7 Ultimate including SP1 from my desktop Ė that copy isnít the one Iíve got running on now. According to the thread ďWin 7ís no-reformat, non destructive reinstallĒ by Fred Langa, there will not be any problems as the ISO including SP1 acts as some kind of backup during the repair installation. Once this task has been performed, I guess that new registry key is given to activate the OS through M$ Windows ie 10, so the software becomes legitimate with the Genuine star by M$ and as a result from the patch Tuesdays the updates can yet again be installed.

    Additional information

    Two months back, as an administrator I did a scannow that showed NO problems with the OS and no repairs had to be done.

    Thank you for posting the right step by step instructions on how to perform a full repair install for Win 7 Ultimate without losing any important data that my slightly limping OS needs to undergo.

    Addicted

  2. #2
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    First, you should backup your system. Get an imaging app, if you don't have one, use the boot disk and backup your whole disk. Like this you will have a safe backup that you can resort to, in case things go wrong.

    Now, addressing the issue, are you sure you cannot replace the existing key with a legitimate one? I never experienced a situation similar to yours, but my understanding is that you can replace a non legitimate key. Check the answer by the moderator in this thread: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/w...a-ea04b643daf0

    That answer seems to go in accordance to what I had read before, that you can replace your existing key. I would give that a try.

  3. #3
    5 Star Lounger
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    Cool

    He may have a problem if the activation key is for windows with SP1 and his installed copy does not have SP1. But I believe you can download SP1 from microsoft downloads (not sure of this so will have to look). If he then installs SP1 if possible then maybe the new activation key can be used in control panel > system at the bottom should be link to change key.
    Clive

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by curiousclive View Post
    He may have a problem if the activation key is for windows with SP1 and his installed copy does not have SP1. But I believe you can download SP1 from microsoft downloads (not sure of this so will have to look). If he then installs SP1 if possible then maybe the new activation key can be used in control panel > system at the bottom should be link to change key.
    That would be a problem. I believe you cannot install updates or Service Packs to a non genuine Windows copy. A repair install with SP1 non a non SP1 version won't work, either.
    If this is the situation, I would go for a full data backup and then clean install 7 SP1, from the Windows 7 SP1 disk.

  5. #5
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    After you finish whatever method you use, I would consider partitioning your HD into 2 separate drives. The first approx. 75 Gb to 100 Gb (whatever size will easily fit the OS and installed apps. The second with the remainder of the drive. You can then put ALL DATA into the second drive (D Drive, Data Drive, whatever you wish to call it. Use the approved method to move the Windows system data folders, including the mail Store Folder. Also place all app data in this separate partition. By doing this you will effectively save your data from problems with the OS. I use Partition Wizard for this partitioning chore.

    I have used this method for several years, through several different OS changes, and dual boot scenarios, and never lost any data. Some people say with today's OSs and H/W there is not nearly the need there once was for segregating your data. I say what happens if the OPs problem happens to me. I can reinstall the OS, or better yet restore my latest Image of my OS without ever touching the Data Drive! I never loose any of my important data with this method.

    Of course in addition to Imaging the OS drive, I also back my data up separately as well. Both the Image and data backup are stored on ext. HDs. In this way if my HD itself fails I can install a new HD and restore my Image and data backups. I might need to fix some driver issue for the new HD, but I can get back into business fairly quickly.

    If you have to wipe everything out and start fresh, you can format the HD as part of the reinstallation process. After choosing to Custom Install your OS, the next screen will give a link to Drive Options (Advanced). Choose this, highlight the drive containing your OS (I suspect you only have one partition at this time) and choose Format from the options. Answer yes you realize all data will be lost. The installation will continue after the format. Install all apps, including the Imaging app. At this point I would see how much space is used, and partition according to the size you have used. Remember to leave enough free space (I left about 40 Gb on my system). Go through the moving procedure I outlined above, then using the Imaging app, open the Image file you created and move all your data onto the Data Drive you created. You would replace the Favorites folder on the Data Drive with the Favorites folder in the Image file, etc.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    Reading the article from Microsoft has enlighten me that maybe the OS can be slipstreamed and thus many (if not all) of the problems will forever be gone and seems to be a very tempting alternative to try out.But judging from the experienced comments it seems that the slipstreaming process have some very serious flaws like when duplicating files (that could lose your mail accounts with the Internet provider) with the approved RT Seven Lite v2.0 [preferably use recent version1] resulting with not including the crucial SP1 file in the extraction to the ISO.

    As Win 7 uses Folders or Libraries and can also demand a lot more time in executing its work , Iíve been very skeptical to partition my HDD of 500Gb in RAW pre NTFS mode (now 465Gb of usable space).But if any future intrusions might occur then itís advisable to have - if not three - then at least two partitions leaving around 80Gb- 100Gb for the OS and installed apps and be aware that the hard drive will not perform as quickly as up to now @7200 RPMs.Anyway, I do export (back up)my large files to an external HD.

    The last advice with partitioning is for obvious reasons logical, however, the slipstreaming procedure might be the wiser alternative to choose and afterwards activating the OS with the new key provided from M$ through ie10 and install all the updates.Once that is done I can make a DVD copy of that actual Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 and save it for any future reference before 2020 when M$ will prompt you to use the Win 8 instead as Win 7 no longer is supported.At that point, a new internal SSD drive from Intel might be a vise investment.

    Awaiting your thoughts before backing up 300Gb+ of information and performing the time consuming act of ďreinstallingĒ the semi new OS.

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