Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lake Villa,IL
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Win 98 SE Password

    I have an old Dell Windows 98 SE that still works and was being used only for my large model railroad inventory (cars and pubs). No password installed. CMOS battery replaced recently, now it demands a password. I tried booting with an emergency Win 98 floppy, no success. I have tried every old password I can think of, no success. I tried downloading a Win 98 password breaker. Since I have no starting point (hints) for the password cracker, it says it will take 248 years to crack it. (I should have backed it up but....)

    Anyone have any helpful ideas? I tried removing and re-installing the CMOS battery, no change.
    Regards,
    Catmanbob

  2. Subscribe to our Windows Secrets Newsletter - It's Free!

    Get our unique weekly Newsletter with tips and techniques, how to's and critical updates on Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows XP, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Google, etc. Join our 480,000 subscribers!

    Excel 2013: The Missing Manual

    + Get this BONUS — free!

    Get the most of Excel! Learn about new features, basics of creating a new spreadsheet and using the infamous Ribbon in the first chapter of Excel 2013: The Missing Manual - Subscribe and download Chapter 1 for free!

  3. #2
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    A cultural area in SW England
    Posts
    2,822
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 108 Times in 102 Posts
    PCs of that vintage often had a jumper hidden somewhere on the motherboard which could be put across two pins to bypass any power-on password which might have been set. You would have to look at the documentation for the motherboard/PC.

    That's unless you are referring to some completely different password!
    BATcher

    Dear Diary, today the Hundred Years War started ...

  4. #3
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,139
    Thanks
    202
    Thanked 206 Times in 198 Posts
    You might try connecting the hard drive of the old Dell to a newer computer, and see if you can access your data on the newer computer. If that works, then copy your data to a newer medium (e.g. the hard drive of the newer computer), and you're done.

    If you can't access the data from the newer computer, you might consider setting up a VM (virtual machine) in the newer computer, installing Windows 98 SE (or maybe XP) as your OS, and then connecting the hard drive from the old Dell to the newer machine. If you can get it working that way, you will have greatly stabilized your situation with regard to your railroad inventory, because you will have eliminated a seriously weak link -- the very old PC.

    However you solve this, once you get it solved, I'd highly recommend that you do a backup, because the hard drive that the data is on is likely very old and therefore is another seriously weak link in this process.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2013-03-04 at 13:24. Reason: spelling errors

  5. #4
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    east coast
    Posts
    376
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    can you boot into the bios and change the setting there ?
    Last edited by speedball; 2013-04-04 at 11:37.

  6. #5
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    1,218
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 163 Times in 126 Posts
    If the problem was caused by replacing the battery....then something got scrambled in the bios. That's not unusual, when you take out a failed battery and put in a new one immediately.

    Take the battery back out, with all power removed from the computer, and leave it out for about 30 minutes.
    That will allow the programmable memory cells in the bios to totally drain. Then put the NEW battery back in and restore the line power to the PC, boot up and go right into the Bios, set the time and data and SAVE.

    Your PC should now boot up to Windows.

    Report back,

    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  7. #6
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Joshua, Texas
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I seem to recall that Win 98's log-in password could be by-passed just by leaving the password field blank and hitting either the <enter> or the Escape key. If I'm incorrect, chalk it up to old-timer's disease affecting my RAM ;-)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •