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  1. #1
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    Reinstalling XP on another machine

    I shall soon be retiring my old Dell desktop, which runs Windows XP 32 Bit. My new machine will probably have Windows 8. I have a legacy application, that I wish to retain, that will not run under Windows 8, so I shall install XP in a separate partition or on a separate drive.

    The problem is that my copy of XP is a Dell OEM "Reinstallation DVD". I have seen it said that this can be used in the way that I intend, and elsewhere, that it cannot. Certainly, it is possible to buy the DVDs for ruined machines on ebay with (somehow) unused product keys that are guaranteed good for this purpose. However, since I already have the DVD, I would rather use this. Is what I propose possible, and if so, how do I get a new product key?
    Last edited by JohnLo; 2013-03-06 at 07:50. Reason: Removed ref to incorrect title (that having been corrected)

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    If you could get it installed by meeting all the hardware prerequisites that will otherwise give you a bluescreen when installing, it is also quite unlikely you will find any compatible XP chipset drivers for the new machine. I mean the chances are really slim unless you build your own and the motherboard comes with XP drivers.


    What might work (or might not) is to try Paragon's GoVirtual program and make two different virtual machine images (so you can try them both), one for VMWare player and one for VirtualBox. Skip the Virtual PC one since it's not supported on Win8. If that didn't work you could then try installing to a virtual machine and getting that activated and installing what programs you need there. In that case the install should work since the hardware layer is virtualized, and don't forget about the little white lie in all cases for activation of an OEM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    What might work (or might not) is to try Paragon's GoVirtual program and make two different virtual machine images (so you can try them both), one for VMWare player and one for VirtualBox. Skip the Virtual PC one since it's not supported on Win8. If that didn't work you could then try installing to a virtual machine and getting that activated and installing what programs you need there. In that case the install should work since the hardware layer is virtualized, and don't forget about the little white lie in all cases for activation of an OEM.
    Couldn't he open a Hyper-V session in Windows 8 and install XP there?

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    Sure, that's another way, more advanced but it should work. Is it included in all versions?

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    The above comments were both useful, and prompted me to undertake a little 'research' on the matters referred to.

    On the subject of chipset drivers, Intel produced updated versions in December 2012, and Windows XP is supported. The list covers some of the latest chipsets, and perhaps all of them. The link to my source is below:

    http://pcsupport.about.com/b/2012/12...7-vista-xp.htm

    Hyper-V looks very interesting (see http://www.infoworld.com/d/virtualiz...08436?page=0,2).

    There would seem to be no reason why XP could not run under this. Interestingly, it seems that it would be valid to make an image of an XP system drive, and use this. I have now reduced the size of the system partition on my second hard drive to 14GB, and intend to make an image copy onto a 16GB flash drive. I shall also retain the two drives themselves when the machine is dumped.

    Given that Hyper-V or something similar will always be available, it seems to me that there is effectively no time limit for running XP using this method. If that is the case, people with XP-based legacy applications can relax. My only reservation is that virtual machines must surely run much more slowly than physical machines.
    Last edited by JohnLo; 2013-03-06 at 07:55. Reason: Changed "system drive" to "system partition"

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    It is not valid to use an OEM XP version on anything other than the original PC. To install on a new PC or in a VM you need a retail license.

    Joe

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    Pity. Seems that Infoworld must have got it wrong. I wonder if there is any way to decide who is right (I have no view
    either way).

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    Seems that I misread the infoworld article. Nonetheless, at least there is a legitimate way to handle the problem. Perhaps also an illegitimate one as well, given that that the OS in the image will already have been activated, although I am not suggesting that anybody should do that.
    Last edited by JohnLo; 2013-03-06 at 03:14. Reason: Clarification

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    I have used OEM to install on another machine and I just had to re-validate the install and it's been working fine.
    Of course, I am only running it on one machine and not two.
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

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    I've just had a closer look at the Dell "Reinstallation DVD", and here is what it says:

    "The software is already installed on your computer. Only use this DVD to reinstall the operating system on a Dell PC".

    Note that it does not say "...on the same PC". The inference is that it can legitimately be installed on a different PC (provided, of course that it is a Dell PC), and has been removed from the other. This may be why some people have had no problems in making the switch, although I am not sure how Microsoft would know whether the new machine was a Dell or not.

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    Well, that's probably because it's a branded version from Dell..
    I misunderstood what you said in your original message.

    I only use OEM operating systems when I buy them because my windows 7 system and my XP I built myself.

    I believe Dell motherboards are made for Dell so that's probably the reason you need to install the Dell OS..

    That's just my opinion and maybe others here can offer a solution.
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

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    John: Keep in mind that if you run Hyper-V or some other virtual machine, you will need to keep up with your Windows (and other) updates in the virtual machine AS WELL AS in the host machine. Also, you'll need anti-virus software in both the virtual and host machines, as well as keeping up with the updates, scanning, etc, in both machines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLo View Post
    Given that Hyper-V or something similar will always be available, it seems to me that there is effectively no time limit for running XP using this method. If that is the case, people with XP-based legacy applications can relax. My only reservation is that virtual machines must surely run much more slowly than physical machines.
    This is very true in the hardware sense. In fact, people with very old machines, running an old but critical program, would do very well to either try to install it on a newer machine, or install it in a virtual machine, because the old computer will sooner or later fail and be unrepairable, leaving them with nothing.

    But from a software perspective, as the OS gets older (in this case, XP), there will come a point when people quit supporting it. For example, no more Windows updates, and no decent anti-virus software available.

    This isn't a huge issue, because you're using the old OS (i.e. XP) only for one piece of software; all your other software, your printers, your phone, etc., will all be running / connected in the host OS environment (e.g. Windows 8), which means that just about all that you are running WILL be supported.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2013-03-06 at 11:11.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLo View Post
    I've just had a closer look at the Dell "Reinstallation DVD", and here is what it says:

    "The software is already installed on your computer. Only use this DVD to reinstall the operating system on a Dell PC".

    Note that it does not say "...on the same PC". The inference is that it can legitimately be installed on a different PC (provided, of course that it is a Dell PC), and has been removed from the other. This may be why some people have had no problems in making the switch, although I am not sure how Microsoft would know whether the new machine was a Dell or not.
    The install DVD is tied to the BIOS of the original machine. The only way I know of to get around this is to modify the DVD content and build a new DVD. That does NOT mean it is legal to do this. Windows operating systems supplied by computer vendors are licensed to be used only on the machine on which it was originally installed. It is a violation of the original EULA regardless of how you choose to interpret what is printed on the DVD.

    Joe

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    Jim:

    With the particular application that presents the problem, there is no reason to connect to the Internet. I have found that when booting from a second hard drive, I do not have Internet access (and have been unable to find out how to get it). Perhaps this would also apply to an OS running under Hyper-V. Presumably, if there is no Internet access, the issue of viruses, updates, etc does not arise. However, this is only a presumption; I do not pretend to know.

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