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  1. #1
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    Setting a static IP address for my desktop

    I want to connect to my desktop remotely to see the Bird Box camera I have installed.
    I can at present do so with little problem.
    But occasionally the computer will have to reconnect with the router (Belkin N600).
    When this happens it nearly always gives it a new local IP address.
    I have the router set for port forwarding but this relies on the Desktop been at the IP address which is set in the port forwarding .
    I have checked on line to see how to set a Local Static IP address but so far have not done so because
    I keep getting the impression it means I will loose my internet connection to my ISP who uses Dynamic DNS
    as one of the settings required is the DNS server and this is not static.

    I know about using a DDNS service but don't want to do that if I can avoid it.

  2. #2
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    Why don't you reserve the IP address for the desktop? It's easy to do, your Belkin should support (mine does) and there is nothing to change, except at the router.

  3. #3
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    I think there is some mixed up terms in the questions you ask.

    First a question: if the bird box camera connected to the router and available on your internal network, or is it remote and connected to another network. I suspect it's internal and available on your network, so the following is based on that assumption.

    It's straightforward to set a static internal IP address on the PC. Open the properties of the network adapter (the route to that varies depending on which OS you use). Select TCP/IPv4, and click Properties. Now, before entering any data, go to the web interface on the router, and check the range of the DHCP server. Armed with this information, set the fixed IP address in the Properties of the TCP/IPv4 window to be something outside the range of the DHCP server. Set netmask to be 255.255.255.0 and the gateway to be the IP address of the router. Set the DNS server in the TPC/IPv4 window to be the IP address of the router.

    That will set an static IP address on the PC, you can now adjust the router to forward the ports required to the new static IP address. The PC will remain behind the firewall and NAT, so it's quite safe enough.

    Then to access the desktop PC depends on your location. If you are inside your network, you can use a VNC server and client to route traffic internally (so nothing escapes over the internet). However, using VNC is not recommended for public routed traffic due to security reasons. In point of fact, if you use VNC you don't need to use a static IP address as it will pick up the host name of the Desktop PC.

    If you are located remotely from your Desktop PC, you could use a service such as Teamviewer or Logmein to access the PC remotely. Neither o those required a static Public or Private IP address. Both services route traffic securely over the internet so are more suitable if you are accessing your Desktop PC from outside your network.

    Now, turning to a couple of other items, I doubt very much if you ISP will use Dynamic DNS. DNS (Domain Name System) is a global Internet service that translates Host names to IP addresses so that access to those hosts can be routed over the internet. The DNS server at your ISP will almost certainly use a fixed IP address (you can probably find this by inspecting the router status). If the ISP used a dynamic DNS server, how would your router know which DNS server IP address to forward its queries to?

    Is suspect you have mixed terminology or been given poor advice that fails to differentiate between Dynamic and Static Public IP addresses and DNS. Your ISP will almost certainly issue Dynamic IP addresses to its client (you). This is so it can manage a limited pool of IP addresses. Restarting the router will likely result in the ISP issuing a new public IP address to the router, but that will have zero effect on how you access the bird box camera as long as you are accessing it from inside the network.

    If however, you are accessing the bird box camera from outside the network, then you may have either a static IP address on the camera (or its router), or use a Dynamic DNS service to make the camera host name discoverable with DNS.

    But I have some concerns about how you are currently accessing the desktop PC remotely: if you have portforwared from outside the network (i.e from the internet) directly to the desktop PC (this is known as setting it in the DMZ or Demilitarised Zone), the Desktop PC is very insecure and should not be used for anything else other than the bird box camera.

    In summary, if you are in a different room at home, use VNC to connect to the Desktop PC and view everything over VNC. If you are at work or a coffee shop etc and just want to check the bird box at home from time to time, install TeamViewer or Logmein on the Desktop PC and access the machine using those services. None of those options require a change from DHCP to static IP and none expose the Desktop PC to increased internet based threats.
    In God we trust; all others must bring data.

    - William Edwards Deming. 1900 - 1993

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Tinto Tech For This Useful Post:

    Scott5 (2013-03-18)

  5. #4
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    setting a local Static IP for one computer.

    Ruirib I have checked in the help files and online and can find no simple way to reserve an ip address for one particular computer on my Belkin N600.
    That would be a wonderful option.

    Tinto Tech thanks for the info it is a bit clearer now.

    My problem was following the instructions online on setting up a fixed or static IP address for the desktop on which I have the Birdbox software.
    I wrongly thought the DNS from my ISP changed I now know that is not the case it is the IP that's dynamic.
    I have the software emailing me every time the ISP changes the IP address so I can access the Desktop via port forwarding.
    No problem with that it works well.

    What was happening, was if for any reason the desktop had to reconnect to the router it would then be assigned a different IP address
    192.168.2.3 then next time 192.168.2.7 now with port forwarding you have to set the IP of the computer on which the software is located.
    Clearly the router changing the IP address is not any good so I needed to make it static,

    Will now re-examine the settings I found online to make the IP static for the desktop.
    Hopefully that won't effect the Laptop or Smart Phone access.

    Cheers again

  6. #5
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    I could almost best that you can do it. Type router on your browser and you will get to the router setup page (you can also type the IP for the router). You will get to a page with a similar menu on the left:

    Routermenu.JPG

    From there you can click DHCP Client List and you should get to a screen similar to this:

    ReserveIPs.JPG

    Find the device you want in the first list and just click Reserve.

    I would be surprised if Belkin had stopped offering this option.

  7. #6
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    ruirib I have no problem getting to the LAN > DHCP Client List on my router.

    But it does not have the option of reserving any one of the IP addresses
    All it has showing is IP Address, Host Name, and Mac Address no option to reserve.

    I did find a section on the Lan settings page

    The length of time the DHCP server will reserve the IP address for each computer. and this is set to "forever"
    but it obviously doesn't keep the same IP address for each machine because it does change it if I have to reconnect
    for any reason.

    Tinto Tech
    I have followed the instructions to fix a static IP address I found on line but had all sorts of problems.
    It kept telling me that the router was under the control of a different IP address and then I actually lost connection.
    I only got it re-connect using Windows fault finder to restore the DHCP to the automatic IP option.
    Now restored the automatic option and will see if the IP address changes again.

    All very confusing.

  8. #7
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    Oh well, amazing how they remove some interesting features from newer routers.

    I would have to agree with Tinto and suggest that you use TeamViewer. It is free for non profit use and it will avoid messing with the IP settings.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    Oh well, amazing how they remove some interesting features from newer routers.

    I would have to agree with Tinto and suggest that you use TeamViewer. It is free for non profit use and it will avoid messing with the IP settings.
    I too doubt that you are mistaken about his router, but the fix is on the computer's side. Connection and packet routing are independent of the DHCP server. If auto DHCP is disabled, then all devices must be configured manually however, even if auto DHCP is enabled in the router, the router will still connect with devices configured manually (not requesting an IP, but having it assigned).

    I haven't done this in Windows newer than XP. It's done in the advanced settings of the network connections there. Others will have to help with more recent versions.

  10. #9
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    I forgot to add that the LAN screen that he referred to, reflects the range of the LAN in the router's IP subnet. The static IP assigned to the computer must be in that subnet.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by hemeloser View Post
    I too doubt that you are mistaken about his router, but the fix is on the computer's side. Connection and packet routing are independent of the DHCP server. If auto DHCP is disabled, then all devices must be configured manually however, even if auto DHCP is enabled in the router, the router will still connect with devices configured manually (not requesting an IP, but having it assigned).

    I haven't done this in Windows newer than XP. It's done in the advanced settings of the network connections there. Others will have to help with more recent versions.
    I'm not disputing that, it's just that would be incredibly more easier to do it on the router side. Also, care will need to be taken to remove the manually assigned IP from the pool of IPs that the router can assign.

  12. #11
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    Depends. If there are no other requesting devices, or if the leasing client is not turned off, the likelihood of reassignment of the IP is small. A strategy to employ where that is a concern is to choose an IP near the end of the pool.

    But you're right about the software approach for those who don't want to mess with manual configuration.

  13. #12
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    Angry Blxxxy Belkin Router

    I have tried every thing I have found on the net and here and the help files for the Router.

    Useless.

    Even if I set the lease time to the DHCP server IP address allocated to each machine on the router to forever
    it still changes them if I loose the connection and have to reconnect.
    This means that once the virtual server is set to access the birdbox camera via IP ending in xxx.xxx.xx.3 when the router as changed the IP
    to another address eg: xxx.xxx.xx.7 the virtual server is then unable to point to the birdbox camera.

    Even if I use any of the programs you suggest or DDNS service they will not work once the router as changed the local IP address.

    If I disable the automatic DHCN on the router I then cannot get access to the router settings for some reason.
    When I try to log into it, it shows a text message saying "Duplicate Administration this is been administered by XXX.XXX.XX. x
    x been a number that none of the computers had before the router updated.

    So frustrating.

  14. #13
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    TeamViewer does not depend on a specific IP, so it's not useless at all. It's precisely because it will connect to your computer regardless of the IP that it was recommended.

  15. #14
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    Question Not sure you have understood my problem?

    Let me get this right.
    It will connect even though the IP address from my ISP will keep changing that I understand.

    But how does it alter the forwarding setting using the local IP the router has assigned to the Desktop Computer.

    When I set up port forwarding I have to put in the local IP address the router has assigned to the desktop.
    If for any reason the desktop as to reconnect to the router it will get a different IP address assigned
    which means the port forwarding information I inserted is now incorrect and you cannot see the Birdbox remotely.

    I suspect the software can cope with the different IP address assigned by the ISP
    but I don't see how it can alter the portforwarding settings in the router.

    Maybe I am missing something here.

  16. #15
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    You don't need port forwarding

    You don't even need to have port forwarding at the router.

    You will run two instances of TeamViewer - on the desktop and on the computer from which you want to access the desktop. You setup the desktop computer for unattended access. You also create a Teamviewer account and the computers where you have Teamviewer installed will automatically show up under My Computers in TeamViewer. To access the desktop you will just have to right click it in the My Computers list on the other computer and choose Remote Control. That's it.
    TeamViewer works over routers, firewalls, etc. The Teamviewer app in the desktop will register with Teamviewer servers, on boot, so the IP for the desktop is always known.

    This is actually safer than having port forwarding and it is easier too.

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