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  1. #1
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    Question Embarrassing question

    I bought a solid-state hard drive (SSD) to increase speed of saving/restoring my huge document. I copied the Word (2010) files I'm working on to it, but I forgot to copy the templates and normal.dot? files. There are no normal.dot? files on my SSD. I need to know what auxiliary files to put there and where to put them. E.g. in the same half-dozen folders as the docx's or somewhere else? (Only the main docx files needs careful formatting.) Thanks for any info!

    Steve

  2. #2
    2 Star Lounger
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    The default templates will be in a folder on your main drive; probably somewthing like C:\Users\*username*\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Temp lates. Open the Developer ribbon and click Document Template to get the Templates and Add-ins dialog, then click Attach to see the path.

    What other files do you need? Or, more to the point perhaps, what are you missing from before you moved to the SSD?

    As an aside, why is your document so large? If you use embedded objects (graphics, images, etc.) the files size can get very large, but it can be quite manageable if you use linked objects instead. I frequently have documents with many hundreds of pages: one was >600 pages long with hundreds of Excel charts, dozens of formulae, many images as well as a ToC, index, and internal cross-references -- yet the Word document was just over 2MB. The archived file with all of the linked objects was >20MB, but by keeping those elements out of it, Word was still very snappy during editing and formatting.

  3. #3
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    Eric, thank you. I will look into your suggestion. If I understand, I don't really need templates on the SSD. Unfortunately I don't recall how Word was working before I moved the book to the SSD.
    My document is a book of 1300 pages with no figures or illustrations, just pure text, some of which is contained in hundreds of Word tables. The original problem was (possibly still is?) that my table formats, especially those with a numbered list of paragraphs, were being changed behind the scenes when I saved and restored the book file. (Indents and inter-paragraph spacings were being modified.) I am trying to fix this by making the styles of these tables one of only three that I created. Many of the tables need modification from the style they belong to, but this does not seem to be a problem.

  4. #4
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    SSD links and leads

    Google ‘SSD installation’ for 13,600,000 hits, or Yahoo! for 1,010,000 hits or Bing for 698,000 hits, or…

    You get the idea. Both hardware and knowledge are getting better all the time, so keep an eye on the date posted.

    I have a 128 GB Kingston and am very happy with it. 128 is ample for Windows and Office and third-party apps and data (with limited photos) all on the same drive, although I will admit that I’d prefer double the size. Don’t partition it – just use folders, and if possible clean install (there are system settings that a clean install will set for you, and hidden files you may not need). Do back up or straight copy data on a frequent or continuous basis – I find that an SD card is a convenient and out-of-the-way onboard second destination.

    Newegg SSD: A 20-min tutorial, with valuable installation information after the halfway mark. They have other relevant tutorials as well.

    CodingHorror.com: A funny but out-of-date blog about SSDs. There are other funny links on this site to such unfunny subjects as backups.

    Wikipedia: extensive coverage.

    ASK: many links from this.

    Electronics360: Economics of the market (Ultrabook portable)

    Storagesearch.com: Enterprise level, but very informative source for users at any level, which, incidentally, applies to all information technology.

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