Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Post Bios not booting, very grateful if anyone helps

    My laptop has Vista Ultimate, and when I try to boot it, it gives error message [B]"PXE-E61 Media test failure, check cable. PXE-MOF: Exiting "

    And

    "insert the correct boot media and press any key"

    Inserting the Vista Disk into the CD Rom drive and inserting the Ultimate boot disk into the CD Rom drive are of no avail.

    What could be wrong? Before the crash I had suspected malicious code due to folders full of files forming on my computer's partitions and other strange behaviour and wiped clean one of my partitions and then deleted that partition using paragon (free version) partition manager. Upon restarting to complete the partition deletion the crash had occurred

  2. #2
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    20,609
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 623 Times in 557 Posts
    Welcome to the Lounge!!

    Is your BIOS set to boot from the CD first?

    Joe

  3. #3
    Platinum Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    3,736
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 240 Times in 228 Posts
    This message indicates a problem with your hard disk, probably as a result of deleting partitions.
    Can you boot from the Ultimate boot CD?

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    4,872
    Thanks
    68
    Thanked 557 Times in 505 Posts
    Do you have an SSD? I got that same message when I temporarily bricked mine trying to do a firmware update. Eventually got it running again but that's another story....

    Jerry

  5. #5
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Check BIOS

    You will need to see where your BIOS is attempting to boot from. It may be that your system is partially booting from a corrupt file or set of files, possibly caused by the partition deletion. There are different keys to press for different systems to get to the BIOS. Usually it involves holding down a particular key or key combination during start-up (F8, or Alt-F1, for example). Do a search on your model and "accessing BIOS". See what the BIOS lists as the boot order, and move the CD drive to the first position (meaning the computer will check there first for a bootable image, like your ultimate boot disk).

  6. #6
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Western Kentucky
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    If not mistaken, PXE-MOF is for the network boot interface. This can be disabled in the bios. However, it doesn't look like you have a boot-able device available or it a boot-able device has been deleted/removed from the boot list in the bios. Knowing what model of laptop, you have would be beneficial; because, then could advise what keys to press to enter the boot menu on startup. This should display all boot-able options, any you could select the device you wished to boot the laptop from. If the Vista disk will boot , in this case, follow the prompts til get to the choice "Repair your computer" and select. Once at the menu, would try the first option 1st, and see if it will auto-fix. If the doesn't work you may have to try something like this....
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392

  7. #7
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New Hampshire USA
    Posts
    424
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 36 Times in 33 Posts
    Just to make it clear, the one device that you probably DON'T want the BIOS to try to boot from is the network (LAN), and probably not from 'other' either if it's an option you can disable (since it might include the LAN boot facility). Since you presumably weren't trying to boot the machine from some remote source before the apparent malware attack which you described, the fact that it is now trying to do so is at best very suspicious: it may be that the malware took steps to protect itself against the corrective steps you took (I hope they included full scans of the entire system by at least one and preferably two respected anti-malware applications) by redirecting the BIOS boot mechanism to a nefarious remote source on the Internet (that's one of the things that booting from the LAN is able to do) that will happily reinstall the malware on your system the next time you boot up while connected to the Internet (and the target server can be reached, which doesn't appear to have been the case when the error was being returned to you).

    As an example, the infamous Chernobyl virus contained facilities for modifying some BIOSes in this manner (if it could first get by some protective code in NT-based Windows systems, but if you don't have a good real-time anti-malware application protecting you this is not at all inconceivable), and one of its variants activated on the 26th of any month (I notice your original post arrived on the 27th - hmmm...).

    All that said, this is not a subject I'm very familiar with - I mostly wanted to emphasize that if you haven't yet taken more steps to rid yourself of the apparent infection you described you should probably do that.

  8. #8
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    London
    Posts
    67
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    It's a big pain reading a forum thread with no subsequent input from the original poster.
    Last edited by Just Plain Fred; 2013-04-26 at 18:41. Reason: Language edit

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •