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  1. #1
    Lounger
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    Unhappy deleted hiberfil.sys in error on win 8 laptop working too fast

    I'm new to windows 8 but was helping on a new setup using a guide I read too fast it recommended turning off hibernate but only on a desktop ( that's what I read too fast ) so my question is if I turn back on hibernate by cmd and powercfg.exe /hibernate on will it rebuild hiberfil.sys?

    since turning it off the system is strange ex. pointer doesn't turn into a hand at the top of the modern UI to pull it down to close it. A this is the only tweak I did it must be connected

    Any help appreciated Bob

  2. #2
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    See http://www.pcworld.com/article/20169...windows-8.html
    for instructions to re enable hibernate. Windows 8 will rewrite hiberfile.sys when you power down.

    Jerry

  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    It is entirely possible the strange behavior with the hand is related, especially if they started at the same time.

    By the way, it does not hurt to turn off hibernate on laptops either. I do not hibernate either of our laptops with no adverse affects at all. There have been some documented problems associated with Fast Start which I do not wish to have. I believe the hybrid hibernate used for fast start is also turned off when hibernate is disabled.

    Jerry's instructions are spot on for re-enabling hibernate.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    The only issue with Fast Start that I am aware of is that selecting power off or pushing the power button performs a hybrid hibernate instead of a complete shutdown which bothers some people. Choosing restart will do a complete shutdown before doing the restart. I have my laptop set to hibernate when on battery power and i close the lid and have fast start enabled and have not noticed any problems.

    Jerry

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I have read of others having various problems that were attributed to Fast Start. I can not think of the instances right now, but perhaps someone else will chime in to answer this.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


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  6. #6
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    The only issue I can recall is the inability to get into BIOS with fast start. This is easily remedied with doing a restart instead of power down. I love fast boot on a laptop with an SSD. Boot is almost instantaneous with all the apps I had previously running still active. Its like using sleep with no battery drain. I've been using it since Windows 8 first came out but everyone has their own preferences.

    Jerry

  7. #7
    4 Star Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    The only issue I can recall is the inability to get into BIOS with fast start.
    Then perhaps you haven't seen the others. While I don't claim to have seen all of them, the following come to mind:

    1. You can't change the connected hardware while (nominally) 'shut down' and expect it to work when you start up again. For example, when I moved my USB wireless mouse/keyboard temporarily to another system and substituted a PS/2 mouse and keyboard, my system was unusable on startup (I had to plug the USB devices back in just to get it to shut down cleanly). If the same applies to disks as well I fervently hope that the system doesn't start up merrily using the configurations of the old disks to operate upon the new ones, resulting in their corruption. I have verified that an optical drive connected while the system is (nominally) shut down is not recognized on starting it up again until you instead perform a restart. Another user found that removing a data drive while Win 8 was 'shut down' resulted in Win 8 refusing to start up (claiming that a 'required drive' was missing).

    2. Changes you make to the system in Control Panel may not be applied on the next startup. For example, changing the boot-up default in a multi-boot system will be ignored unless you restart rather than shut down and then start up.

    3. My impression is that you cannot start up in Safe Mode (or use other recovery options) when just 'starting up' (as you would have been able to in any previous Windows environment). Or choose to boot any other system that you may be multi-booting with. Sure, you can use Restart instead, but until one learns this significantly different behavior these constitute problems (as many posts here by perplexed users have demonstrated).

  8. #8
    Silver Lounger
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    We used to think Microsoft made things difficult/stupid/non-intuitive when we had to use the start button to shut down..ah, the good old days huh? Now hibernate is not available by default but that's what shut down is using, which is no longer a shutdown and can mess things up royally if changes are made while "shut down." A restart actually is the equivalent of a shut down but even an advanced tech couldn't be held responsible for such a mistake.
    Maybe Blue will have Full Shut Down and Hybrid Shut Down or something like that to clear up this mess.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by - bill View Post
    Then perhaps you haven't seen the others. While I don't claim to have seen all of them, the following come to mind:

    1. You can't change the connected hardware while (nominally) 'shut down' and expect it to work when you start up again. For example, when I moved my USB wireless mouse/keyboard temporarily to another system and substituted a PS/2 mouse and keyboard, my system was unusable on startup (I had to plug the USB devices back in just to get it to shut down cleanly). If the same applies to disks as well I fervently hope that the system doesn't start up merrily using the configurations of the old disks to operate upon the new ones, resulting in their corruption. I have verified that an optical drive connected while the system is (nominally) shut down is not recognized on starting it up again until you instead perform a restart. Another user found that removing a data drive while Win 8 was 'shut down' resulted in Win 8 refusing to start up (claiming that a 'required drive' was missing).

    2. Changes you make to the system in Control Panel may not be applied on the next startup. For example, changing the boot-up default in a multi-boot system will be ignored unless you restart rather than shut down and then start up.

    3. My impression is that you cannot start up in Safe Mode (or use other recovery options) when just 'starting up' (as you would have been able to in any previous Windows environment). Or choose to boot any other system that you may be multi-booting with. Sure, you can use Restart instead, but until one learns this significantly different behavior these constitute problems (as many posts here by perplexed users have demonstrated).
    1. If you plan on changing connected hardware, do a restart instead of shutdown.
    2. Again, do a restart instead of shutdown.
    3. This is an issue independent of fast start and is a major annoyance to me

    None of these issues prevent me from using Fast Start. If they annoy you enough, then by all means disable Fast Start.
    Don't count on Blue to change any of this.

    Jerry

  10. #10
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    One and two, yes, now that we know we can make allowances for them. I most certainly would have made the mistake of shutting down and not realizing it was a hibernation, and make a bunch of changes at some point had I not learned of the behavior. Just seems the process is more occluded than ever before and it would be so simple to be plain and up front; add the proper labeling to the buttons, howsoever that may be so as to make it clear to everyone what is actually going on. Fast start becomes a more useful tool that way as well instead of a potential gotcha.

  11. #11
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Fast start is useless if one doesn't shut down, and restart takes inordinately longer (with the Windows 8 boot loader) when one merely wants to restart for dual boot. I have fast start disabled, and I use the Windows 7 boot loader.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  12. #12
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    Fast start is useless if one doesn't shut down, and restart takes inordinately longer (with the Windows 8 boot loader) when one merely wants to restart for dual boot. I have fast start disabled, and I use the Windows 7 boot loader.
    A 5 second boot using Fast Start is hardly useless to me. Restart doesn't take any longer than a boot with Fast Start disabled for me but I don't dual boot so I can't comment on that situation. Most Windows 8 systems are single boot. Fast Start isn't for everyone but I definitely wouldn't reject it out of hand.

    Jerry

  13. #13
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    A 5 second boot using Fast Start is hardly useless to me.

    But it's still slower than not shutting down in the first place, which makes it a moot point. We don't all shut down; most of my routine maintenance is carried out by Task Scheduler, and Task Scheduler doesn't work if the machine is shut down. On my laptops I use hibernate on battery and sleep on AC, so they never shut down, either.

    There is the old wives' tale that Windows needs a reboot periodically, but it's just that - an old wives' tale. Properly configured, Windows runs just fine for weeks on end, rebooting only for the occasional Windows Update that requires it.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    Fast start is useless if one doesn't shut down,
    ... or hibernate, which I do almost every day.

    You don't see any advantage in hybrid sleep in case of power loss?

    Bruce
    Last edited by BruceR; 2013-04-04 at 12:30. Reason: desktop may be superfluous in the context

  15. #15
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    But it's still slower than not shutting down in the first place, which makes it a moot point. We don't all shut down; most of my routine maintenance is carried out by Task Scheduler, and Task Scheduler doesn't work if the machine is shut down. On my laptops I use hibernate on battery and sleep on AC, so they never shut down, either.

    There is the old wives' tale that Windows needs a reboot periodically, but it's just that - an old wives' tale. Properly configured, Windows runs just fine for weeks on end, rebooting only for the occasional Windows Update that requires it.[/SIZE]
    Fast Start is much quicker than hibernate on my Windows 8 laptop and doesn't drain battery power like sleep does.

    I agree with you about not having to reboot Windows so on a desktop, I can see where not shutting down is an acceptable alternative. I shut my desktop down every night anyway for the admittedly small power savings. To each his own.

    Jerry

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