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  1. #1
    Star Lounger burger2227's Avatar
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    Is there a way to copy XP drive to a new hard drive

    Also will XP recognize a 250 GB drive? I have heard rumors that it does not.

    I would just like to copy everything to the new drive before the old one gives up.

    Thanks,

    Ted

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Ted,

    Yes XP will but there may be limitations based on your system BIOS and the File System (Fat 32 vs NTFS) you choose and wether or not you want it as a single or multiple partitions. Here's a good link for understanding what I said above. HTH
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    Don't know if its included in the link or not but as long as you're using XP SP2 or later, no problem recognizing drives up to 2 terabytes.

    If you have a good working copy of XP running right now, and want to copy that to a larger or newer drive you want to look into hard disk cloning, which basically makes an exact copy that is indistinguishable from the original. Just have to make sure you clone the XP drive to the blank drive and not the the blank drive to the XP drive. I use EaseUS ToDo free but their Disk Copy product would probably work equally well in this instance. Others most mentioned here are Macrium Reflect and Acronis True Image derivatives available from Western Digital and Seagate if using either make drive as the source or target.

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Disk cloning or imaging would be your best bet. Choose an imaging application that also includes disk cloning.
    Most of the well known drive imaging applications have them.
    Ensure the app you get or have, fully supports Windows XP. And ensure that your Windows XP is fully service pack enabled (SP3).
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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  7. #5
    Star Lounger burger2227's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. I downloaded Acronis from Western digital, but I don't see the new hard drive. Acronis sees it and cloned it and I still don't see it listed in My Computer.

    I took less than 30 seconds and asked to reboot. Then I got MBR errors and Windows restarted. Still don't see HD listed.

    Error loading BAR in MBR comes up now before Windows boot

    The stupid software wants to get rid of any partitions too so I cannot partition it before I clone and don't have the software anyhow.
    Last edited by burger2227; 2013-04-04 at 18:05.

  8. #6
    Star Lounger burger2227's Avatar
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    I found out that I had to format the HD first. The software never mentioned that or gave any kind of indication that something was wrong. It just quit and went straight to Windows. I called Western Digital and the first thing they wanted was the S/N on the hard drive before they could answer my questions. I just blew them off by saying it was in the PC and I could not get it out.

    The tech told me to go into System Administrative, Computer Management, find the drive and click on Format in NTFS. Then I should try to run Acronis True Image again. This time it rebooted and went to a copy screen that took over an hour to finish. This time it said it was completed and started Windows again. Now I can see the drive in Windows Explorer. No wonder people can't do things on computers. They hide all of the good stuff...

    The MBR error is still coming up, but it most likely is the PCI Network card that failed immediately after I installed the new hard drive. And no, I was nowhere near it. I checked the card seating and it is OK, but it forced me to get a NetGear USB device to get on the Internet to find help.

    So here is how this computer is doing so far this year:

    1) Replace power supply on a whim that it might be worth saving. It works, but then the hard drives start acting up.

    2) I purchase a hard drive because another Acronis backup program keeps warning me that both hard drives are bad.

    3) Once the drive is installed, the Network fails at startup. I click on the menu icon to repair it and the icon completely disappears. It isn't listed in the Network anymore either.

    4) I fix the Network with a new device, with Windows constantly begging to use the Internet to find the driver. Hey fella, I don't have the Internet yet, that's why I am trying to install this software. (I actually had to let Windows install the NetGear driver on another machine because the CD software kept losing the connection. So far I have only had to tell it the WEP security code twice on this one.)

    So now I have a clone drive, so what are the odds that it will work like the old one?

    Thanks everyone!

    PS: The Acronis backup software now says that both of the hard drives are just fine! Now it wants me to back up the old one on the new one. Hey fella, I just did!

    PPS: You cannot install the Acronis software without a WD hard drive installed. What does that tell me about Western Digital?
    Last edited by burger2227; 2013-04-04 at 22:40.

  9. #7
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    FWIW, I would recommend AGAINST having a backup clone drive installed as a secondary drive (with file access to Windows). The potential exists for both drives to be corrupted (a number of ways), leaving you with NO working backup. IMO, the drive should be unmounted, except when doing another clone. Otherwise, remove it altogether.

    That's one of the reasons that image file backups are done, rather than clones. Acronis will create and restore image files. It also will do incremental backups of files that have changed, so that a complete subsequent backup isn't necessary.

    Of course, it's your choice.

  10. #8
    Star Lounger burger2227's Avatar
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    Where did you get that idea? I never intended to and I don't believe I insinuated that either. The Acronis software rebooted to the old hard drive on its own. Another reason to question it rather than me. I have enough problems! LOL

    I will keep the drive as is as a backup to the new one if something is missing. I am using the new one already with no other drive. Thanks for your concern.

    I am going to see if the second drive shows up as good tomorrow. This may border on fraud having software tell you that hard drives are bad to get you to buy a new one. It was purely chance that WD was my choice as the replacement. A 50% chance...
    Last edited by burger2227; 2013-04-05 at 00:41.

  11. #9
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hemeloser View Post
    FWIW, I would recommend AGAINST having a backup clone drive installed as a secondary drive (with file access to Windows). The potential exists for both drives to be corrupted (a number of ways), leaving you with NO working backup. IMO, the drive should be unmounted, except when doing another clone. Otherwise, remove it altogether.
    That's one of the reasons that image file backups are done, rather than clones. Acronis will create and restore image files. It also will do incremental backups of files that have changed, so that a complete subsequent backup isn't necessary.
    Of course, it's your choice.
    You can have any number of drives physically installed in your system, but for safety and to keep one OS from futzing with another one, (which it's well documented, they can and will do) just unplug the power connector from the drives you're not using.

    Whenever you're installing a new OS, or similar activity, it's a good idea to only have ONE drive powered up at that time.
    If you give an OS install program a multiple choice of what drive to install on, it will almost always pick the wrong one.
    Murphy's Law!

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  12. #10
    Star Lounger
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    Well the poster was not installing, he was cloning. That's a perfectly acceptable use of the two connected drives. The problem arises from having duplicate OSes, whether on the same drive and separate partitions or separate drives. When these are mounted, they are subject to file manipulation and malware. Hence the admonition is about duplicate OSes, not multiple active drives. BTW, mounting and unmounting drives is much easier than opening the case. ;-)

  13. #11
    New Lounger
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    great answer, easus todo is one of the best tools for cloning and backup

  14. #12
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    I've done this a number of times with Win2K Pro all the way through Windows 8 Pro Upgrade using drive imaging; Image for DOS and/or Image for Windows from TeraByte Unlimited. These aren't free, but are inexpensive (Image for Windows includes Image for DOS and some other goodies for one price). The process is much the same, I believe, regardless of which imaging software one chooses.

    Just select the entire hard drive (includes all partitions, even hidden) and create the image to an external drive, then restore that image to the new drive.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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  15. #13
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Any number of 3rd party Imaging apps can accomplish this. I use Acronis True Image 2013, others talk about Macrium Reflect, EaseUS ToDo, Ghost, Image for Windows, etc. These are all good apps that many here use successfully.

    Any of the mentioned apps should be able to either Image (for back up and disk replacement purposes) and clone (generally for disk replacements purposes although some use this for back up as well).
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  16. #14
    New Lounger
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    The best way to do that, I have found, is to use OSFClone. It is FREE .... just Google it. Unlike other cloning programs, this creates an identical drive. You must use the same size hard drive to create the clone. It is important to familiarize yourself with dos and don'ts of this program though, as it is powerful, and is permanent. It is run from your CD as the boot starter, so I have found it is important to disconnect from the internet, and clone to my second hard drive when I won't be using the drive for an hour or so. I have identical 80Gb drives that used to clone like this every week, though now we have taken to doing this every other evening. When we had a failure of the C: drive some time back, we simply removed it and replaced it with the cloned E: drive. The PC boots right as though nothing happened, HOWEVER, ALL input into the PC since the date and time of the last clone is absent .... which is why we have chosen to do this every other day now.

    I realize it is sort of over the top, but it has proved itself, and the inconvenience of the PC being unusable for that short period of time is not an obstacle we can't deal with. We are the licit owners of all of our software, but taking the time to re-install and update those programs would be a task we would not like to deal with!

    As I said, there are others, including xxClone, but we have found that, even though the xxClone will indeed boot, it is not truly a complete clone, though we may revisit that program to see if it is perhaps been improved.

  17. #15
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    Don't know if its included in the link or not but as long as you're using XP SP2 or later, no problem recognizing drives up to 2 terabytes.

    If you have a good working copy of XP running right now, and want to copy that to a larger or newer drive you want to look into hard disk cloning, which basically makes an exact copy that is indistinguishable from the original. Just have to make sure you clone the XP drive to the blank drive and not the the blank drive to the XP drive. I use EaseUS ToDo free but their Disk Copy product would probably work equally well in this instance. Others most mentioned here are Macrium Reflect and Acronis True Image derivatives available from Western Digital and Seagate if using either make drive as the source or target.
    I also used EaseUS ToDo to clone an XP HD. I had an old XP with 2 HD's (40 GB and 20GB) The 40 GB was the boot drive with the OS and it used ~18 GB. I was able to clone that drive to the 20GB and it left me with 2 GB free. It took about 45 min. When I unplugged the 40GB, the system booted up fine and it has been working for 3 weeks now with no problems. I just use this machine to surf on the net and read email. As long as you do not choose the option to clone "sector by sector" you can clone a larger drive provided you do not have more data than the smaller drive can hold. My understanding is that with some other cloning software the drive you are going to clone to must be equal or larger than the original. Now I took the 40GB drive and I put it in one of those USB cases that converted it to external HD where I can back up my pictures and some music. By the way, you do not have to format the drive. EaseUS software will do it for you as part of the process. It boots your pc into linux and then it does it's thing. I have to say, for a free program, it does what it says and it does it easy and well.
    Last edited by johngaz; 2013-08-26 at 12:44.

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