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  1. #1
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    Missing 1 GB of Memory

    I have 4 GB of memory installed, yet when I go into diagnostics, it only registers 3. Is this a known Win 7 issue?

    Not sure how to check if memory stick is good or not. Any help with this please?

    Deb
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    What does your BIOS show? Have you had a look?
    Rui
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    That is a normal condition for a 32-bit Windows operating system. There's only room to address 4 gigs so other vital components of your PC get address space and what is left over, typically 2.75 to 3.5 gigs, is still available to address RAM. You're smack dab in the middle of that range. Some systems will now report how much is installed and then how much is available in parenthesis but I don't know if this is universal so it could be that one stick is not being reported also if you have 4 sticks installed (1 gig each).
    Last edited by F.U.N. downtown; 2013-04-20 at 09:21.

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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    That is a normal condition for a 32-bit Windows operating system. There's only room to address 4 gigs so other vital components of your PC get address space and what is left over, typically 2.75 to 3.5 gigs, is still available to address RAM. You're smack dab in the middle of that range.
    I think, although I am not certain, that if this resulted from Windows being unable to use some of the memory, it would state it, as described here:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/978610

    I am not sure,though, and I no longer run 7 x86 Windows versions, so I cannot confirm it.
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    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    I was under the impression that 32 bit W7 stated something like '4GB installed, 3GB usable'. Check with Resource Monitor, Memory tab and attach a screenshot the graphical section.

    I suspect a faulty or dislodged memory stick/slot.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Satrow is correct. See my listing below. If it also shows 3 gigs in BIOS, reseat the memory as satrow suggested. If it still doesn't recognize 4 gigs, you either have a bad memory stick or your motherboard doesn't support 4 gigs. Check your motherboard manual.
    memory.jpg
    Jerry

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    If that is always the case and since it is not reported as such in this case then at least we know all 3 gigs is presently employed or reserved for use; which is better than some of my systems that only use 2.75 gigs. So one might expect a gain of between 0 and 17% should all 4 gigs be present.

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    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    How much of the installed memory that is usable depends almost entirely on the hardware, with a 2GB graphics card on 32 bit Windows, just under 2GB usable of 4GB installed would be the norm; I would assume that to be the same if 3GB was installed.

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    Hello. I have been chasing this 4 G for at least three years now. I am in the same boat, 4 G installed, 3 useable. I have removed one stick at the time, it shows 2 G left, same with the other stick, so both are good. I run a 64 bit MoBo and W-8 now, 64 bitness. I also now have a Vid card that has its own memory mounted on it. Is it still robbing 1 G from the MoBo installed 4 G ?? I stated this here about 3 years ago when first running 64-bit W-7, no joy. I also went on some other forum, no solution. Stuck on 3 G ! JP.

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    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    How much of the installed memory that is usable depends almost entirely on the hardware, with a 2GB graphics card on 32 bit Windows, just under 2GB usable of 4GB installed would be the norm; I would assume that to be the same if 3GB was installed.
    Are you sure? I thought the 2gig would on the add on video card, not system memory. I agree with you its hardware dependent though. Some motherboard on board video does use up system memory.

    Jerry

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    Are you sure? I thought the 2gig would on the add on video card, not system memory. I agree with you its hardware dependent though. Some motherboard on board video does use up system memory.

    Jerry
    I think this results from the fact that peripherals, including graphics adapters, are memory mapped and the address space of memory mapped peripherals is shared with RAM, so the more memory mapped space peripherals take, the less usable RAM you get. That's why going 64 bits can be so relevant.

    In a rather old laptop, while running Windows 8 Pro x86, I had just above 2 GB usable RAM, from the installed 4 GB. Going x64 solved the issue (and almost all the 4 GB RAM became usable).
    Rui
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    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    OK. Thanks Rui.

    Jerry

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    A typical discrete GPU needs about a quarter gig of hardware address mapping from everything I've read, regardless of the actual amount of memory a GPU card has.

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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    A typical discrete GPU needs about a quarter gig of hardware address mapping from everything I've read, regardless of the actual amount of memory a GPU card has.
    I think it's not a one to one ratio, but you cannot assume it's always just 256K. Mark Russinovitch explains it clearly, as usual:

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussi...1/3092070.aspx
    Rui
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  15. #15
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    The consumption of memory addresses below 4GB can be drastic on high-end gaming systems with large video cards. For example, I purchased one from a boutique gaming rig company that came with 4GB of RAM and two 1GB video cards. I hadn't specified the OS version and assumed that they'd put 64-bit Vista on it, but it came with the 32-bit version and as a result only 2.2GB of the memory was accessible by Windows.
    http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussi...1/3092070.aspx

    Though all of this feels like it's not helping the OP in any way. The easiest method of telling which RAM stick or slot is faulty is trial and error, pull all but the first stick in the slot nearest the CPU, boot Windows, check how much is showing. Shutdown and add a second stick, boot Windows, check - rinse and repeat. Take electrostatic precautions - http://www.romulus2.com/antistatic.htm

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