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  1. #1
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    Fix for startup & shutdown problems

    An article from the Windows Club, Reset BootExecute registry value to fix Windows Shutdown & Startup problems, to help resolve startup & shutdown issues.

    Joe

  2. #2
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Joe,
    After all that, what kind of startup and shutdown times do you get?

    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  3. #3
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    I have not had startup and shutdown problems so I've not changed anything in the registry. I rouytinely keep an eye on startup items and get rid things that mysteriously appear.

    I've not timed either startup or shutdown but the time to the login screen is definitely faster than with Win7. I seldom shutdown so I've not paid attention at all to the point of not even being able to make a "seems like it is faster" comment.

    Joe

  4. #4
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    You're hurting windows, by not shutting it down when you're done with it. There are some things that winders needs to do on a regular basis, that it can only do during a complete shutdown, not hibernating or sleeping.

    To just K.I.S.S., I speed up the startup by doing this simple little routine:

    Shorten the Boot Time in XP, Vista & Windows 7 & 8

    Go to the start button, choose run, then type msconfig and press Ok.
    On the system configuration window, choose the "Boot.INI" tab.

    Check “No Gui Boot”, then lower the timeout to a more manageable time.
    I choose 3 seconds in stead of 30. (windows won’t accept a lower number than 3)

    Next choose advanced options.
    This is where you can choose how many processors you have.
    Most modern PC's are duo core (2 processors) with some quad core (4 processors)
    then choose OK. The Windows default is only 1 core.

    Now choose apply and OK, reboot and you should see a marked decrease in boot time,
    And Run-Time efficiency.


    And for a full and complete, Quick Shutdown, I use this simple little shortcut on my desktop, or in my Taskbar.

    %windir%\System32\shutdown.exe -s -t 00 -f

    My boot times are faster, by at least 27 sec's, and my shutdown times are typically 5 to 8 seconds.

    Many Safe Defaults are built into windows, so it will run on even the oldest and slowest pc's.
    But removing many of those defaults, can greatly enhance the operation of Windows (any version).

    I started tweaking and tuning Windows for maximum performance back in the Windows '98 days. It still works.

    Cheers Mate!
    the Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  5. #5
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    From Windows vista on, there is no longer any significant benefit to shutting Windows down on a regular basis. I go months at a time without shutting Windows 8 down. The only time it gets shut down is when it does a restart to complete a Windows Update.

    Jerry

  6. #6
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWho View Post
    You're hurting windows, by not shutting it down when you're done with it. There are some things that winders needs to do on a regular basis, that it can only do during a complete shutdown, not hibernating or sleeping.
    I must take issue with such a statement, as it simply does not hold up in the light of reality. I know personally of hundreds of PC's running Windows 24/7 because they are in use 24/7. They are controlling production systems; multiple process control systems, pumping systems, monitoring systems, maintenance systems, the list goes on and on. These PC's don't crash or hang or freeze or throw up BSOD's; they just run 24/7. Hundreds more are in office environments, and are left running 24/7 so that corporate can push updates to some of the proprietary software overnight.

    When the day shift operator gets relieved by the second shift operator, neither one of them reboots the PC. When the second shift operator gets relieved by the midnight shift operator, neither of them reboots the PC. The only time any of these PC's ever get rebooted is as the result of a power failure, which are very infrequent. The local IT shop consists of three techs who oversee literally hundreds of PC's. Corporate wide there are thousands of PC's, and they run 24/7. And until last year, these were all XP machines. The company finished the changeover to Windows 7 in August, 2012.

    When I had a bench machine to use for my tinkering, my primary desktop never shutdown, and the only reboots it ever got were for Windows Updates that required a reboot. It ran weeks and sometimes months without a reboot. No BSOD's, no performance degradation, no hitches, hangs or freezes. Routine maintenance (deleting junk files, defragging, AV/AM scans and such were taken care of by Task Scheduler, as is done on this desktop now.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  7. #7
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    That's what I do as well, months on end until some runtime glitch that is not recoverable or external loss of power. I can't really remember the day to day of XP prior to SP2 but certainly since; if performance is suffering, it's never apparent.

    Also
    On the system configuration window, choose the "Boot.INI" tab.

    Check “No Gui Boot”, then lower the timeout to a more manageable time.
    I choose 3 seconds in stead of 30. (windows won’t accept a lower number than 3)
    If one goes to CP>System>Advanced system settings>Advanced tab>Startup and Recovery>System Startup (Win7; thru device manager for XP I think), it can be set from 0 to 999 instead of 3 to 999.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWho View Post
    I started tweaking and tuning Windows for maximum performance back in the Windows '98 days.
    I started tweaking with DOS (can't remember which version. 4.xx or 5.xx or something), and 5¼" floppies. I wrote lots of batch files. DOS had a very neat utility called "exe2bin" that would convert a batch file to an executable file - sort of a mini-compiler. It made the batch files run quite a bit quicker (which meant a lot on an 8086 CPU), but they were no longer editable; one would have to bring up the original batch file from one of those big floppies, edit it there, delete the executable, and use exe2bin to turn the edited batch file into a new executable.

    My favorite batch file was one I wrote to move a bunch of files from one directory to another, and delete the files in the source directory. I think the hard drive was a whopping 32MiB, which meant that I couldn't leave everything on the hard drive; had to shuttle stuff back and forth from floppies. I could copy stuff from the hard drive to a floppy and erase it from the hard drive with a single executable.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  9. #9
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    I feel I have to say something about setting the number of processors. During the boot process of a PC the initial use is one processor because it makes no sense and gains nothing to use more than one at the very start. At a certain point in the boot process by default all the processors are enabled. Windows will always enable and use all the processors unless limited in some way. The setting in question is used to limit the number of processor that Windows can use for debugging purposes. Sometimes an error will only show up on fewer processors than a machine has and this setting is a way to have Windows behave as if there is only one or two or whatever is set.

    Joe

  10. #10
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Agreed Joe. I haven't said anything because setting the number of processors in MSConfig doesn't really hurt anything, it just doesn't do any good as you explained.

    Jerry

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    Agreed Joe. I haven't said anything because setting the number of processors in MSConfig doesn't really hurt anything, it just doesn't do any good as you explained.

    Jerry
    To me, since it does not do any good it is just another opportunity for a user to screw up a system while making a change.

    Joe

  12. #12
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Sad but true Joe. Dr Who brings this tweak up periodically and I get tired of refuting it. Glad to see you took up the mantle.

    Jerry

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