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  1. #1
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    How to know whether an SSD is faulty?

    I have installed a 480Gb SSD in my laptop. I keep on getting freezes and blue screen of death.

    I think it is due to the SSD, because I never used to have this before with a normal 500GB Seagate.

    How do I test whether the SSD is faulty?

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  3. #2
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    If you carefully follow the instructions here we can check the crash dumps and other related data, that should help pin down the problem.

    Attach the files back here.

  4. #3
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    Looks like a whole lot of work....
    OK - will try to get to it by the end of the week, or next week.

    Just had a week out of office and need to catch up!

  5. #4
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    It really doesn't take much effort to do it

    An alternative would be to go through the following SSD troubleshooting steps:
    Quote Originally Posted by writhziden
    SSD Troubleshooting:
    The crashes you are receiving are common with SSDs when there are incompatible drivers, hardware, BIOS, or firmware issues. Proceed with SSD troubleshooting:
    • Make sure the following are up to date:
      • SSD firmware
      • BIOS Version
      • Chipset Drivers
      • Hard disk controller drivers/SATA drivers
      • If you have a Marvell IDE ATA/ATAPI device, make sure the drivers are up to date from the Intel site or Marvell site and not from your motherboard/vendor support site.


    • Try doing a power cycle of the SSD. The following steps should be carried out and take ~1 hour to complete.

      1. Power off the system.
      2. Remove all power supplies (ac adapter then battery for laptop, ac adapter for desktop)
      3. Hold down the power button for 30 seconds to close the circuit and drain all components of power.
      4. Reconnect all power supplies (battery then ac adapter for laptop, ac adapter for desktop)
      5. Turn on the system and enter the BIOS (see your manual for the steps to enter the BIOS)
      6. Let the computer remain in the BIOS for 20 minutes.
      7. Follow steps 1-3 and physically remove the SSD from the system by disconnecting the cables for a desktop or disconnecting the drive from the junction for a laptop.
      8. Leave the drive disconnected for 30 seconds to let all power drain from it.
      9. Replace only the drive power connection if it is a desktop, (fully reconnect the drive to the system if it is a laptop) and then do steps 4-8 again.
      10. Follow steps 1-3 again.
      11. Reconnect the drive fully to the system.
      12. Reconnect all power supplies (battery then ac adapter for laptop, ac adapter for desktop)
      13. Start your computer normally and run Windows.



      The above steps were a result of: Why did my SSD "disappear" from my system? - Crucial Community

      While that may not be your drive, a power cycle should be the same on all SSD drives. See how the system responds after the SSD power cycle.

  6. #5
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    Hi Photorer. Several brands and models of SSD have been plagued by exactly the problems you are having. Usually, the fix involves updating the "firmware" for the SSD. Firmware is the version of the controller software built into your SSD. Some brands (such as Intel and Sandisk) have a free "toolkit" available for download on their website which will help you update your firmware to the latest stable version. Other brands simply offer the firmware for download with instructions on how to proceed. If a firmware update fails to resolve the problem then it's time to request that they replace the drive. If it's less than 30 days old the store you bought it from may replace it; otherwise, contact the manufacturer through their Support page and request an "RMA number" for authorisation to send it in for replacement. Certain brands (for example: OCZ) and certain controller software (for example: Sandforce) have repeatedly shown both very high performance and a weakness for freezing and crashing when used with certain widely-used computer components. SSDs using other control software (Marvell, Toshiba, Samsung) have far fewer reports of freezing and crashing. Manufacturers are getting wise to the problems, with more thorough testing before releasing new models onto the market. But there must be millions of units out there which are prone to serious glitches when used on computer motherboards outfitted with certain chipsets and SATA contoller drivers, etc. In other words, even the very best, most reliable brands may experience glitches on certain computers. If we stick with the most reliable brands we have a good chance of avoiding freezes and crashes. We have SSDs from Intel, Kingston and Sandisk plus a Solid State Hybrid Drive from Seagate. Our little 64GB Kingston V100 worked fine except for slowing down its "write" speed after a year or so. Kingston quickly replaced it with an updated SSD and it's been great. All our others have had no problems whatsoever, even though both of our Sandisk models have that glitch-prone Sandforce controller in them.
    So, just out of curiosity, which brand and model is your troublesome SSD?

  7. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    If your purchase is recent (warranted) and you have already updated the firmware on the drive, I would recommend drive imaging, and hard
    copying some of the more valuable data OFF the drive.

    If you have not updated the drive's firmware you will need to visit the manufacturer's site and download their firmware updating utility.
    The manufacturer of the drive may also have a diagnostic tool, if they do, run it. They will usually ask for this prior to effecting an RMA.
    You might also be able to download a bootable deletion tool in the event you need to return the drive.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  8. #7
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    I have been using a Solidata X8-480 480Gb SSD for a while now. I bought two identical ones to provide me with a fast backup system, and redundancy. I use Acronis True Image to clone the drive as a backup on about a monthly basis.

    One drive works perfectly in my HP8540p laptop - but when I use the other, I get irregular BSOD, freezes and loooong delays to open programmes. This one appears to be faulty.

    This is where I purchased the drives from (both at the same time, and their serial numbers are less than 1000 apart!) - I have also sent them a query to see what they can assist with.
    http://www.cssi.co.za/solidata.php

    There is no diagnostic info available either from the supplier or from the HongKong site here: http://www.solidata.hk/cs.htm

    I think the one SSD is faulty, but the other is fine!

    Any suggestions on how to securely erase the drive before returning it for warranty?

  9. #8
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    From the looks of this it sounds like they are made by or affiliated with Crucial.
    You may want to call someone and verify this, or simply post on the Crucial website forums.

    If they are made by Crucial then you should be able to use THEIR utilities, but I would want to confirm this though.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  10. #9
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    You can use the Secure Erase found here: http://cmrr.ucsd.edu/people/Hughes/SecureErase.shtml . Also download or print the Readme file, etc. for instructions. Here's a slightly technical bit. Insert the bootable CD or USB drive then shut down the computer. Unplug the AC power cord. Remove all drives except the SSD you want to erase (if it's a laptop it may well only have one drive). Next, power back on and enter the system BIOS (by pressing the Delete or other key as soon as you power on). In your computer's BIOS setup screen locate the SATA configuration area. This setting is probably on AHCI (or maybe Advanced). I think you need to reset that to plain old IDE (or Normal or Legacy). In other words, the opposite of AHCI/Advanced. Next, go to the Boot section in the BIOS and choose CD/DVD as first boot device (or USB Flash drive, as appropriate) as First Boot Device Save the changes and exit. The computer should boot up from the CD or flash drive you created. It's a little DOS program. Follow the instructions from the Readme file to Secure Erase your SSD. Good luck.

  11. #10
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    The best and most secure way to erase the data on a hard disk drive or solid state drive (SSD) -

    http://www.pcbuyerbeware.co.uk/The-b...ve-and-ssd.htm

  12. #11
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    Update on the "Faulty SSD" story!

    I cleaned the drive using the Secure erase option of Acronis TI Home (I have a copy). It did a good job, but took a whole weekend (480Gb SSD) and cleaned it completely writing random 0's and 1's....

    I then took it back to the place I bought it from and asked them to test the drive. They did a quick test within about 2 hours, which could not find any faults. They then put it on a long - detailed test, which took around 3 days. This also found no problems with the drive, so I have it back again - same as it was (just blank!). They used their proprietary testing regime, and it reverted with no problems.

    I am still rather wary of using the drive as main OS drive, because of the possible data loss. Not too much of a problem, because the other 480Gb SSD that I bought at the same time works flawlessly. So I will keep using it as a clone backup, in case there is a problem with the good one.....

    Thanks everyone for your tips and trouble to help me out. Much appreciated!

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